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Author Topic: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK  (Read 485 times)

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Offline Manny

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How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« on: April 30, 2020, 10:26:01 AM »
An article sent to me by a member here. Translated from Russian.

======================

“One of the daughter’s first words is 'mask'”: how a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK

North Korea has long gained the fame of one of the most closed states. But in the era of the pandemic, life in Pyongyang seems even more free than in other countries of the world. As the situation is developing in the DPRK, where officially there is not a single case of coronavirus, says Elena Sorokina, who has been living there for two and a half years with her husband and daughter.



Insulation of varying severity

In late January, the DPRK government resolutely closed the border with China (at that time only a few hundred cases of the disease were confirmed in China). In Pyongyang, hotels were immediately empty, and groups of Chinese tourists disappeared from the streets. At normal times, they flew by regular flights from Beijing, Shanghai, Shenyang and charter flights from other cities.

After that, we began to mentally prepare for the closure of flights with Vladivostok and watched with fear the growing number of people infected in Russia. Expectations came true: already in early February, North Korea turned into an island, which can not be reached.

The main fear was that someone from the diplomatic corps would be let down by health - before, foreigners went to solve serious problems to Beijing, and Russian citizens to Vladivostok. For my husband and me, these measures also meant that vacation broke. Since then, the only thing that connects us to the outside world is the Internet.

At the same time, our daily life has changed. Previously, foreigners could freely walk around Pyongyang, go with the locals to the same shops, restaurants, hairdressers, etc.

But at the beginning of February we were informed that it is now allowed to use only what is in the dipgorodok: a couple of shops and restaurants, an atelier, a massage parlor and a hairdresser.

So the foreigners were in joint quarantine . We stopped interacting with the Koreans, with the exception of the employees of the above institutions - they were also isolated. It was then that the whole country wore masks.

There was also psychological discomfort: our world narrowed to a few hectares. My husband and I were upset again - we wanted to go to the mountains for the weekend, but we were no longer allowed to leave the city.

After March 4, a transition period began, when hotels and one park in the center of Pyongyang were opened for us. And now we can go to shops and restaurants that have a license to serve foreigners.

Life during an epidemic

The streets of Pyongyang are not empty, life goes on. It does not seem that someone lost their jobs due to the epidemic : all enterprises quit quarantine in full force. Although the DPRK is a socialist state, the problem of unemployment is never officially here.

However, some restrictions also affected the inhabitants of the DPRK themselves: schools and kindergartens were closed for about two months - now high school studies have resumed.

Children are still not allowed to enter parks and some catering establishments and shops. Skating rinks and pools are closed for everyone.

Mass events were canceled, among which - the annual international marathon, flower shows Kimcheniriya and Kimirseniya. The April Spring Arts Festival, which takes place every two years and has always been a resounding success, has not taken place.

Even the main holiday for North Korea - April 15 Sun Day (the 108th anniversary of the birth of the founder of the republic, Kim Il Sung) - was very quiet. There was no central ceremonial meeting with reports and concerts. At the same time, the Koreans, as in other years, lined up in long lines for several hundred meters in front of the monuments of leaders to bow and lay flowers. True, this year they came in families, not groups.

Nowhere else will you meet a company of more than five people. For Koreans, this is a serious blow - they like to arrange "bulgogi" (barbecue) in nature.

In the parks, older people no longer dance in a circle to funny pop songs. Now they are dancing for two or three people right on the go, holding portable speakers in their hands.
The daily news release ends with a summary of the world coronavirus situation.

In the country's main newspaper, Nodon Sinmun, a separate page has been allocated for information about the epidemic. Recently, one respected scientist published an article there that you can use kimchi as a means of prevention (the main dish of Korean cuisine is spicy pickled vegetables, most often Chinese cabbage. - Ed.).

Retro-style posters hung around the city with the words: "Reliably prevent the penetration of the virus." On the premises you can see home-made posters telling about the rules of hygiene. Before entering any institution, everyone must treat their hands with bleach or alcohol and measure the temperature.

One of the first words of the child is “mask”

My daughter is one year and seven months old. When we were offered to fly away before quarantine, I hesitated, but not for long. It was immediately obvious that the conditions for children are better here. Even during the most severe isolation in February, we had a territory for walking, and now Moranbon Park in the city center has also been added. There are all foods for a healthy baby.

Leisure for foreigners in the DPRK and before quarantine was quite limited, so we are not used to it. The only thing is the pity that this year we will not be able to observe our family tradition and go for a walk in the botanical garden on our wedding anniversary. At this time, magnolias are blooming there. I hope that soon we will be allowed to travel outside the city. In May, you can already sunbathe on the coast of the Yellow Sea.

We take our daughter everywhere: to the park, restaurants and shops, let the waitresses play with her - they are always very happy about this. For all the time, only once we were not allowed to take her to the department store.

With this daughter is allowed to walk without a mask. Everyone understands that it is impossible to force her to wear a child at the age of one and a half years. But she already knows this word and rejoices when I put a mask on her face. She feels like an adult.

The author is Elena Sorokina (Koltsova), you can follow her on Instagram >>here<<.

Article source in Russian >>here<<.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2020, 10:30:29 AM »
My daughter is one year and seven months old. When we were offered to fly away before quarantine, I hesitated, but not for long. It was immediately obvious that the conditions for children are better here. Even during the most severe isolation in February, we had a territory for walking, and now Moranbon Park in the city center has also been added. There are all foods for a healthy baby.

This stood out for me.

It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.  :chuckle:
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

Offline Olga_Mouse

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How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2020, 01:19:09 PM »
But at the beginning of February we were informed that it is now allowed to use only what is in the dip.gorodok: a couple of shops and restaurants, an atelier, a massage parlor and a hairdresser.

Helping google translate a bit  :knit:  Dipgorodok is an abbreviation from "diplomatichesky gorodok" = "diplomatic city". A notion that might be foreign to Westerners, but fairly common in the countries of Soviet block. It is an apartment complex (or a few complexes) with the protected grounds, with their own shop(s), restaurant(s), sometimes even a kindergarten and an international school. All this is designed for diplomates and their families solely.
Leaving Russia is not an emigration, rather an evacuation.


Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2020, 01:44:09 PM »
But at the beginning of February we were informed that it is now allowed to use only what is in the dip.gorodok: a couple of shops and restaurants, an atelier, a massage parlor and a hairdresser.

Helping google translate a bit  :knit:  Dipgorodok is an abbreviation from "diplomatichesky gorodok" = "diplomatic city". A notion that might be foreign to Westerners, but fairly common in the countries of Soviet block. It is an apartment complex (or a few complexes) with the protected grounds, with their own shop(s), restaurant(s), sometimes even a kindergarten and an international school. All this is designed for diplomats and their families solely.

Thanks for the translation, Olga. I wasn't familiar with the word.

Yes, there is a small diplomatic area. I went in the supermarket there one night for some wine. It was surprisingly well stocked. At the time they told me it was a store "just for foreigners". Reading since I gather there's a club there, and all sorts of amenities diplomats and business folk may want. IIRC Felix Abt referenced it in his book "A Capitalist in North Korea".
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

Online andrewfi

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2020, 06:04:51 PM »
CF. Green Zone in Iraq.
...everything ends always well; if it’s still bad, then it’s not the end!

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2020, 07:05:48 PM »
My daughter is one year and seven months old. When we were offered to fly away before quarantine, I hesitated, but not for long. It was immediately obvious that the conditions for children are better here. Even during the most severe isolation in February, we had a territory for walking, and now Moranbon Park in the city center has also been added. There are all foods for a healthy baby.

This stood out for me.

It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.  :chuckle:

See there are no real sanction in the DPRK. China sells them what ever they need.

Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2020, 12:46:29 AM »
My daughter is one year and seven months old. When we were offered to fly away before quarantine, I hesitated, but not for long. It was immediately obvious that the conditions for children are better here. Even during the most severe isolation in February, we had a territory for walking, and now Moranbon Park in the city center has also been added. There are all foods for a healthy baby.

This stood out for me.

It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.  :chuckle:

See there are no real sanction in the DPRK. China sells them what ever they need.

Most of the stuff in that supermarket was western European. As in Russia, life continues and your sanctions become just another obstacle to work around.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2020, 04:56:23 PM »
Yes their just drive a truck thru China and go where they want. Just fake they are being so hurt by sanction. This war heats up from to time top time which you do not seem to understand. They have a such a military advantage the USA troops need to stay there. North Korea does not have any interest in signing anything that recognizes the south.  If we left they would over run the south then claim it was always there then kill millions of people in South Korea claiming they were traders that aided USA occupation as they would call it. You read about it in RT news and think that is just find and those people deserved to die for what they did.   

Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2020, 05:03:34 PM »
Yes their just drive a truck thru China and go where they want. Just fake they are being so hurt by sanction. This war heats up from to time top time which you do not seem to understand. They have a such a military advantage the USA troops need to stay there. North Korea does not have any interest in signing anything that recognizes the south.  If we left they would over run the south then claim it was always there then kill millions of people in South Korea claiming they were traders that aided USA occupation as they would call it. You read about it in RT news and think that is just find and those people deserved to die for what they did.

You have a warped view of reality, Tex. It was moulded by CNN, MSN, Fox et al.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2020, 06:32:01 PM »
Actually you do more to shape my view then any of those stations. Listen to you talk about DPRK and then check them out. Research it and read and listening to your behaved in the past.  Remember the guy that was nearly killed in North Korea for stealing a poster and your response that they were justified. Then you say the USA is occupying South Korea when we are not. That is just propaganda from North Korea will to justified killing people when they finally take over like what happened in Viet Nam. The North Vietnamese used much of that kind of wording also and much of the same story Korea is now using.  North Korea developing Nuclear weapons was against international law. This is why China and Russia voted for the sanctions. Then you think we should not have sanctions they deserve for breaking the law. They are mild because China breaks international law and supplies North Korea what ever they want. Then you think we should leave South Korea having a huge military disadvantage making it rip to be invaded. The million of dead people is what comes next. Been there, seen it. Had Vietnamese wife.   

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2020, 06:55:58 PM »
As far as I can understand the family depicted is not typical to the average citizen of North Korea. Yes it might be nice to purchase some Grey Poupon but that product I doubt is high on the majority of North Korean's shopping list.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2020, 09:17:24 PM »
It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.  :chuckle:


Yes, it is very inconvenient for me. Why wear masks if there is nobody is infected?  I get tired of first hand reports from the 1% of the North Korea that foreigners are allowed to see. Wish they let people see more. But what I do want to see is pleasure squads for the rich and powerful. I think Dennis Rodman had a lot of fun in N Korea. He's said he never seen anybody party as hard as Kim Jong Un.

https://www.the-sun.com/news/767712/kim-jong-un-pleasure-squad-virgin-schoolgirls-sex-north-korea/?utm_campaign=sunustwitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1588348471
"Billy, go read. You don't need to be an 'expert' to read. Billy, again read stuff. Even if this disease ends up being serious, in a few months it will be gone. That's how these things work." quote by forum epidemic and virology expert Andrewfi Jan 28, 2020 on the coronavirus

Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2020, 11:11:47 PM »
It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.  :chuckle:


I get tired of first hand reports from the 1% of the North Korea that foreigners are allowed to see. Wish they let people see more.

That family live in the capital. During non Corona times they are free to travel freely around. They don't need guides like tourists. When lockdown came, they chose to stay. The woman who lives there reports life is better for children there than in Russia.

But her first hand report you find tiring because it doesn't fit your narrative.


But what I do want to see is pleasure squads for the rich and powerful. I think Dennis Rodman had a lot of fun in N Korea. He's said he never seen anybody party as hard as Kim Jong Un.

You're not tired of his reportage of the Joy Division though.  :)

Remember the guy that was nearly killed in North Korea for stealing a poster and your response that they were justified. .

Not true. Quote me if you think so.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2020, 01:16:58 AM »
Actually you do more to shape my view then any of those stations. Listen to you talk about DPRK and then check them out. Research it and read and listening to your behaved in the past.  Remember the guy that was nearly killed in North Korea for stealing a poster and your response that they were justified. Then you say the USA is occupying South Korea when we are not. That is just propaganda from North Korea will to justified killing people when they finally take over like what happened in Viet Nam. The North Vietnamese used much of that kind of wording also and much of the same story Korea is now using.  North Korea developing Nuclear weapons was against international law. This is why China and Russia voted for the sanctions. Then you think we should not have sanctions they deserve for breaking the law. They are mild because China breaks international law and supplies North Korea what ever they want. Then you think we should leave South Korea having a huge military disadvantage making it rip to be invaded. The million of dead people is what comes next. Been there, seen it. Had Vietnamese wife.

You’re ranting again Tex. You sound like a broken record with your extreme views on North Korea. He’s not a good guy and the country really could do with a quality of lifestyle increase but you and Billy can’t accept reality.

And stop saying the north wants to destroy the south and kill millions, unless you can quote them. Repeating stuff doesn’t make it true but in your case, it makes one a believer. I’ve never had a Vietnamese wife.

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2020, 09:43:07 AM »
It doesn't surprise me, but it will be inconvenient for BillyB who eschews first hand reportage and instead is very fond of telling us untruths gleaned from places like Quora and made up stuff about poverty in the DPRK.

There's so many first hand accounts of people's visits to North Korea on the internet I can link here that it'll make people tired because it's not what they want to hear. I can find a handful of foreigners who actually like living in North Korea and I can find millions of foreigners who prefer to live somewhere else. That's reality.
"Billy, go read. You don't need to be an 'expert' to read. Billy, again read stuff. Even if this disease ends up being serious, in a few months it will be gone. That's how these things work." quote by forum epidemic and virology expert Andrewfi Jan 28, 2020 on the coronavirus

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2020, 10:08:46 AM »
I can find millions of foreigners who prefer to live somewhere else. That's reality.

Those millions who prefer to live somewhere else mostly haven't been there. They are invalid to your point unless they went there then decided to remain elsewhere.

You're getting confused again.

The point is, for many people there, life isnt as bad as your media tells you it is. For many people, life is quite pleasant there. For you, this does not compute and this is why you are getting confused. For that to be true, you must admit your own prejudices were wrong and/or your media lies to you. And you dont want to.

You and Tex want me to tell you its a shithole, that everyone is hungry and eating cardboard, they despise the leader, are downtrodden, oppressed and controlled like 1984 and there's no infrastructure. Because I have demonstrated that's largely not true, you seek to discredit the messenger with whataboutisms and made up stuff.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2020, 10:21:31 AM »
Those millions who prefer to live somewhere else mostly haven't been there. They are invalid to your point unless they went there then decided to remain elsewhere.


People all over the world aren't stupid. They choose Western nations to live over North Korea for good reasons. Tell Kim Jong Un to remove restrictions on people to move out of the country and see if they stay or go somewhere else. People would vote with their feet if Kim Jong Un would allow them to.


You and Tex want me to tell you its a shithole, that everyone is hungry and eating cardboard, they despise the leader, are downtrodden, oppressed and controlled like 1984 and there's no infrastructure. Because I have demonstrated that's largely not true, you seek to discredit the messenger with whataboutisms and made up stuff.


I never said everybody is hungry. There's at least one fat person in N Korea. The capital is made to look modern even if some buildings don't get used for decades.


Because I have demonstrated that's largely not true, you seek to discredit the messenger with whataboutisms and made up stuff.


You've been allowed to see less than 1% of the country yet you imply what you saw represents 100% of the nation. Question why you weren't able to see the other 99% of the country. We have. Don't claim we're ignorant. Blame N Korea for failing to educate you about their nation.
"Billy, go read. You don't need to be an 'expert' to read. Billy, again read stuff. Even if this disease ends up being serious, in a few months it will be gone. That's how these things work." quote by forum epidemic and virology expert Andrewfi Jan 28, 2020 on the coronavirus

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2020, 10:31:34 AM »
You've been allowed to see less than 1% of the country yet you imply what you saw represents 100% of the nation.

Well, I've been all over Pyongyang over about five days, I spent one night in Nampo, I spent one night in Kaesong and went all over there too. They dont have you travelling around in a blindfold you know. You can see the world around you.

But nowhere did I say that what I saw represents 100% of the nation, you made that up. You're making a habit of that, Billy Moby2.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2020, 10:37:14 AM »
Well, I've been all over Pyongyang over about five days, I spent one night in Nampo, I spent one night in Kaesong and went all over there too. They dont have you travelling around in a blindfold you know. You can see the world around you.


That's less than 1% of the nation. You travelled the nice roads they wanted you to travel on. You seen the cities they wanted you to see. They were in control of your vacation.

But nowhere did I say that what I saw represents 100% of the nation, you made that up. You're making a habit of that, Billy Moby2.


When someone questions what the rest of the 99% of the country looks like, you tell them they are wrong as if you know but you're making stuff up. The only people that seen other parts of North Korea are hundreds of thousands of North Korean defectors who told their story yet you dismiss them.
"Billy, go read. You don't need to be an 'expert' to read. Billy, again read stuff. Even if this disease ends up being serious, in a few months it will be gone. That's how these things work." quote by forum epidemic and virology expert Andrewfi Jan 28, 2020 on the coronavirus

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2020, 10:46:06 AM »
Well, I've been all over Pyongyang over about five days, I spent one night in Nampo, I spent one night in Kaesong and went all over there too. They dont have you travelling around in a blindfold you know. You can see the world around you.


That's less than 1% of the nation. You travelled the nice roads they wanted you to travel on. You seen the cities they wanted you to see. They were in control of your vacation.

Much of the rest of the nation is sparsely occupied you know. There's only 25m people and over 10% of them live in Pyongyang. Take out the main cities and there's only farmers left really.

If I visit FL or NY, am I unqualified to comment on the US and my observations less valid because I haven't visited rural Ohio or post hurricane blacks in New Orleans? Would you direct all your tourists away from Disneyland and Manhattan and tell them it isnt real unless they've visited the poor too? This thinking cropped up when I first went to China as well. I reported on a nice area I stayed in and people started foaming at the mouth like you are doing here. 

Slumba's last link documents poor travellers who stay in hostels and eat street food. Most people don't want to exist on $7 a day when travelling. I know I don't.

Quote
When I was in Shanghai a few years ago I was able to see the living quarters for workers at Baoshan steelworks

Quote
It's not difficult to find the poorer side of Shanghai or Dongguan you just need someone who speaks the language and knows the landscape.

Quote
What %age of the Chinese population, would you say has access to a lifestyle like the one you enjoyed while there?

People seem to be obsessing about the plight of those at the bottom of society. One wouldnt go to the US and obsess about post-hurricane blacks living standards, or the plight of the homeless under London's bridges. Yes, the bloke who made my iphone might make a dollar a day, but I have no burning desire to go and meet him.

I don't really get those who think you should go to a place, seek out the bottom of society and attempt to feel their struggle. Is this some kind of western guilt?  ???


Is this an American thing?
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson

Online BillyB

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2020, 11:52:09 AM »
If I visit FL or NY, am I unqualified to comment on the US and my observations less valid because I haven't visited rural Ohio or post hurricane blacks in New Orleans? Would you direct all your tourists away from Disneyland and Manhattan and tell them it isnt real unless they've visited the poor too? This thinking cropped up when I first went to China as well. I reported on a nice area I stayed in and people started foaming at the mouth like you are doing here. 


People are free to come to America to talk about the good and the bad they seen on the internet. I think everybody in the world knows we have ghettos and homeless people in major cities. I'm sure even North Koreans know that about America. I met a Belgium man who comes to America every year renting a motorcycle cruising the road and seeing the sights. He loves it here. I'm sure some tourists had a bad experienced, especially if they were robbed. I once drove all over Mexico. Went to Mexico city and towns so small all the roads were dirt. I was free to go wherever I wanted to in Mexico. They didn't hide the bad and the ugly.
"Billy, go read. You don't need to be an 'expert' to read. Billy, again read stuff. Even if this disease ends up being serious, in a few months it will be gone. That's how these things work." quote by forum epidemic and virology expert Andrewfi Jan 28, 2020 on the coronavirus

Offline Manny

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Re: How a Russian family lives in quarantine in the DPRK
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2020, 12:26:55 PM »
I'm sure even North Koreans know that about America.

I'll answer this on the other topic.
Read a trip report from North Korea >>here<<

"He wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out. He reckons that's a great idea. The Chinese built a wall centuries ago - there ain't many Mexicans over there." ~ Kevin Bloody Wilson


 

 

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