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Author Topic: Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin  (Read 53726 times)

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Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #75 on: November 21, 2009, 12:33:34 AM »
We've covered a lot of ground this early Moscow day and for lunch will go to the nearby home of relatives, cousin Natasha and husband Gherman. It was "Ghera" who was my representative when asking my wife's family for their blessing to propose.

Looks like Natasha has the table set. Ghera should arrive any minute as he works as a police captain at the Duma district, making sure those rowdy politicians don't beat up unsuspecting citizens too badly. Since that is just across the Manezhnaya Plaza from Red Square, he will arrive soon.

This is a communal apartment as Gherman and Natasha own two rooms and another couple owns the third room. The hallway, kitchen and bathroom are shared. Ghera and Natasha have three small children and Natasha's mom, Aunt Lyuba lives with them.

I'm seeing smoked salmon, marinated herring with onions, tomato slices with cheese, crab salad, tinned herring, olives, tomato and cucumber salad with olive oil and bread. Of course there is a box of добрый сок. сок is "juice" and добрый can be translated as kind or as good. Given that it's juice I think we're safe making the assumption that добрый сок is "good juice."


ila_rendered


Ah, looks like you've met my friend Тихон (Ti-hon). Don't worry, he is well house trained as Natasha has put the fear of God in him so that he'll sit there all day and gaze longingly at that fish but he won't dare put his life on the line by setting a paw on the table.

He will however snuggle comfortably on my lap during the meal, in full confidence that "Uncle Mendeleyev" will accidently drop small bits of fish and other goodies in his direction over the course of the meal. Away from Natasha's view of course.  :laugh:

Yes, there is a piano against the right wall and Natasha is a fine musician so at the end of the meal you'll experience some genuine Russian singing at the table before we extend our thanks and return to Red Square and RUA's Moscow tour.

Offline ECR844

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #76 on: November 21, 2009, 06:12:28 AM »
"Mendy,"

That looks suspiciously like a bottle of Монашеский орден "Monastic Order" wine, is it?

Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #77 on: November 21, 2009, 07:43:03 AM »
I believe so, but even with my reading glasses on I can't say for certain. However I know that you've been looking for a way to order it and you are in luck my friend!

Here is the order form: http://goods.marketgid.com/goods/7148104/


Or you can order if from the Moscow firm, Gerris Group: http://vino-massmarket.ru/products.php?category=2&subcategory=80 (Scroll to bottom of page. Photo on right, phone numbers at bottom.)





Offline ECR844

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #78 on: November 21, 2009, 08:15:55 AM »
I'll give them a call, Thanks!

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #79 on: November 21, 2009, 11:27:00 AM »
After enjoying a tasty lunch in a real Russian home we make the quick jaunt back over to Red Square. As we'll be entering Red Square again from Manezhnaya Plaza, let's stop and check for any important email messages.

Got your laptop? On the top level of the Manezh Plaza shops (overlooking the waterfalls) there is an Internet Cafe. Hey, free internet access! (With a purchase of some sort like a soda or beer, etc).





The sign advertises a куриный сзндвич (chicken sandwich) with a coca cola drink for 180p. 180 Rubles is $6.32 at today's exchange rate.

Did you notice the name of the bar on the window sign above the chicken sandwich special? The name of the bar is: бар флегматичная собака, which translates as "the phlegmatic dog bar."   :chuckle:


Stepping outside as we leave the plaza once again we're treated to the beauty that makes up Manezhnaya Plaza and the Alexandr Gardens.
















Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #80 on: November 21, 2009, 12:54:13 PM »
Leaving Manezhnaya Plaza one member of our tour noticed that we had walked past the Lenin Library which is nearby. Although the official name of the institution is Российская государственная библиотека (Russian State Library) most Russian's call it Lenin's Library as that was it's name during the Soviet period.

The plaque on the face of the building is of Pushkin and the statue in front is of Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский (Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky), the famous Russian writer. His best known titles in the West are probably Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.











Re-entering Red Square one is reminded that this is one of Moscow's most popular concert venues. It was several years ago that Рол Маккартни (Paul McCartney) came to Red Square:


24 May (2003)



The stage is most often set with St Basil's Cathedral as the background and GUM is decorated in an outline of lights, usually white to create a Christmas storybook look no matter what time of the year.


ila_rendered

Offline ECR844

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« Reply #81 on: November 23, 2009, 07:57:31 PM »
"Mendy,"

Dimtri was so impressed with this thread he wanted to phone in on his new toy and give a shout out while he had Vlad give him a pedicure



No, "Stubben," it's not the newest Russian prototype of a Wii replacement :ROFL:












Or is it?


Offline skiingandrunning

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #82 on: November 23, 2009, 08:39:16 PM »
For those who have spent a lot of time in Moscow, you would have probably seem the packs of stray dogs running around.  But, this article gives a different perspective on them as it relates to their using the subway to commute (unfortunately, the dogs I have seen have not been in nearly as good of condition as this article leads you to believe). 

http://englishrussia.com/?p=2462

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #83 on: November 23, 2009, 09:57:28 PM »
We're walking past GUM and headed for the opposite end of Red Square.


ila_rendered



At the far end of Red Square lies the crown jewel of Russia. Travelers around the world reportedly identify this one landmark with Russia than any other. While not correct, it is commonly called Saint Basil's Cathedral.




Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #84 on: November 23, 2009, 10:06:18 PM »
We'll have an opportunity to explore St Basil's in great detail, but first there are a couple of nearby things to explore. Two important landmarks lie between the south end of GUM shopping mall and the Cathedral. The first of these is the famous and perhaps not properly described лобное место (Lobnoye Mesto).





лобное место is translated as "place of skulls." “Place of Skulls” is a translation of the Hebrew word “Golgotha”. Contrary to popular opinion, executions were not held in the Place of Skulls. Unruly boyars, the rebellious Streltsy and Stepan Razin were executed at some distance from the Place of Skulls, which was considered holy. The reference in the name to skulls came from the practice of displaying religious remains (relics) of saints at this spot.


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Tradition links лобное место with the deliverance of Moscow from the invasion by the Tatars in 1521. Chronicles first mention it in 1549, when the 20-year-old Tsar Ivan the Terrible gave a speech to the people from the Place of Skulls, calling for reconciliation among warring boyars.

The Place of Skulls that is made of stone with cast-iron gates was built under Boris Godunov. Before the capital was moved to St. Petersburg, the Place of Skulls was the main public and political tribune in Moscow. The Tsar’s decrees and important state documents were proclaimed here, and the relics of saints were placed here for everyone to see. In the 18th century, the Place of Skulls was moved slightly to the east and rebuilt according to the project of Matvey Kazakov.





The circular stone platform which stands before St. Basil's was constructed in 1598, on the site where a wooden dais had previously stood. The platform and its predecessor were used for proclamations to the crowds gathered on Red Square and not, as is often claimed, for public executions. The most famous of these - the quartering of Cossack rebel Stepan Razin, Ivan the Terrible's gruesomely inventive torture of hostile boyars, and Peter the Great's mass execution of the Stresltsy Kremlin guard, all took place nearby.

From here the orders of the Grand Princes were announced by criers. It was also here that Ivan the Terrible, with quite a flare for drama, performed public penitence and several times declared his abdication. It was also traditional for heirs to the throne to be presented to the people here on their fourteenth birthdays. On religious holidays, a lectern was placed on the Lobnoe Mesto, turning St. Basil's into the altar of a vast open-air cathedral comprising the whole of Red Square.


ila_rendered Inside view


Earlier you may recall that RUA member Froid attempted to dismantle the monument and hide it in his suitcase to smuggle out of Russia and into Canada. Russian authorities because suspicious when Froid complained of back pains at SVO airport and his luggage was so heavy that Aeroflot couldn't make a takeoff due to the excess weight. The лобное место is now back in it's rightful place and meanwhile Froid is back in Canada but under 24 hour house arrest with a very attractive female FSB agent assigned to his case.  :nod:

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #85 on: November 23, 2009, 10:34:24 PM »
Throughout history the лобное место (Lobnoye Mesto) has also been the scene of political announcements and demonstrations. In modern times the most memorable was the Демонстрация 25 августа 1968 года ("1968 Red Square demonstration").

The 1968 Red Square demonstration took place on 25 August 25 1968 at Red Square to protest the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia that occurred during the night of 20–21 August 1968, crushing the so-called Prague spring, a set of de-centralization reforms promoted by Alexander Dubček.

Many people over the world had protested against the suppression of the Prague spring with troops of USSR and other countries of the Warsaw pact. One such act of protest took place in Moscow, at the Red Square. The protest was held at the Lobnoye Mesto, to avoid any violation of public order that could have occurred during the demonstration. The protestors were sitting to avoid any inconvenience to ordinary citizens which might be caused by them standing, although this appears to have had little effect.

The protest began at noon as eight protesters (Larisa Bogoraz, Konstantin Babitsky, Vadim Delaunay, Vladimir Dremliuga, Pavel Litvinov, Natalya Gorbanevskaya, Viktor Fainberg, and Tatiana Baeva) sat at the Lobnoye Mesto and held a small Czechoslovak flag and banners with various slogans, including:





"For your freedom and ours" («За вашу и нашу свободу!»),

"We are losing our best friends" («мы теряем лучших друзей»),

"Ať žije svobodné a nezávislé Československo!" (Long live free and independent Czechoslovakia),

"Shame to the occupants" («Позор оккупантам!»),

"Hands off the ČSSR" («Руки прочь от ЧССР!»),

"Freedom for Dubchek" («Свободу Дубчеку!»).

Within few minutes seven protesters were assaulted and loaded into cars by KGB operatives. The Czech flag was broken, and the banners were confiscated. Since Natalya Gorbanevskaya had recently given birth, she was not made to stand trial. The other protesters convinced 21-year old Tatiana Baeva to declare that she had been at the scene by accident, and she was released soon after.

The KGB failed to find out which protester was holding which banner; therefore, all the banners were attributed to each protester, except for Tatiana Baeva, who was released. The banners were branded by the KGB as "anti-Soviet".

During the trials which followed Soviet eyewitnesses declared that they saw protesters leaving the GUM, a large store in the vicinity, even though this store is closed on Sundays. Additionally, all eyewitnesses happened to be from the same military division, even though they all claimed that they ended up on Red Square accidentally.

All of the protestors tried were sentenced to prison sentences, 3 were exiled to Siberia.



40 years later, on 24 August 2008, a similar demonstration with the slogan For your freedom and ours was held at the same spot.





Through the centuries, and often first embraced by the younger generations, this small landmark has seen a lot of history, a lot of changes.

Until the young people of Russia finally have a full taste of freedom, they will never forget the ideals which bring about the Ветер перемен (winds of change).


The Winds of Change (Original: The Scorpions)
I follow the Moskva
Down to Gorky Park
Listening to the winds of change
An August summer night
Soldiers passing by
Listening to the winds of change

The world is closing in
Did you ever think
That we could be so close, like brothers
The future's in the air
I can feel it everywhere
Blowing with the winds of change

Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow dream away
in the winds of change

Walking down the street
Distant memories
Are buried in the past forever
I follow the Moskva
Down to Gorky Park
Listening to the winds of change

Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow share their dreams
With you and me
Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow dream away
in the winds of change

The winds of change
Blows straight into the face of time
Like a stormwind that will ring the freedom bell
For peace of mind
Let your balalaika sing
What my guitar wants to say

Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow share their dreams
With you and me
Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow dream away
in the winds of change


Offline Jared2151

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« Reply #86 on: November 24, 2009, 07:38:28 AM »
Wow Mendy,

   You have a lot of unraveling to do.  Just about everything I have read about Lobnoye Mesto indicated that it was used for beheading.  So, if this wasn't the site, where is it ?

   From what I know, I'd bite down on the cyanide capsule before the KGB took me away.
I think the KGB would be an interesting topic by itself.

   Keep up the excellent work.

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #87 on: November 25, 2009, 12:06:21 AM »
Quote
You have a lot of unraveling to do.

Oh, this is small potatoes. Ole Mendy knows how to stir up trouble.  :chuckle:

Earlier this week I made a change to a Wikipedia article about Eastern Orthodoxy in regards to the Nativity fast. Holy moley, it at least seemed as if every Wiki bureaucrat on the face of the planet wanted to email or post messages of "How dare you mess" in an area where you haven't been granted SYSOP status (evaluation committee or administrator). One editor of a religion/philosophy subcommittee, wanted to know what gave me the right. "I'm Orthodox, and your committee information was wrong" was my reply.  8)



Quote
Just about everything I have read about Lobnoye Mesto indicated that it was used for beheading.

Jared, there is a lot of that on the Web and it's not an undebatable conclusion. This time it appears that Wikipedia got it right, pointing out that "Sometimes scaffolds were placed by it, but usually public executions were carried out at Vasilevsky Spusk behind St. Basil's Cathedral." This is the official position of the Russian State Historical Museum also.

Lobnoye Mesto was of great significance both in political and religious terms. For the relics of saints to be displayed a place should be considered as "holy" and a place where criminals and political opponents were executed would not be considered to be holy.

That's my story and I'm sticking with it.  :)



Quote
So, if this wasn't the site, where is it?

Many historians point to the area directly behind Saint Basil's and some readers may recognize площадь Васильевский Спуск (Vasilevsky spusk) as the location for the Last.fm concert of the Red Hot Chili Peppers at Live at Red Square back on 14 Aug 1999. It was also the starting point for the Moscow hosting of the Formula One race.


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Above: Down the hill from the Kremlin-Red Square area leads to the Moscow River.

We'll come back to this area when we make a tour of the Kremlin wall towers, one by one to learn more of each tower's individual story and contribution to the Kremlin and Red Square.

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #88 on: November 26, 2009, 12:26:47 AM »




Our next landmark really defines Red Square. Around the world it is renowned. When you think of one symbol that identifies our ideas of Russia, of Moscow, and most certainly of Red Square, this is the icon of which we assign to Russia in our minds.

The amazing thing, worldwide, is that nobody seems to know it's real name!



ila_rendered



So, why is the Church of Intercession of Theotokos on the Moat (Собор Покрова пресвятой Богородицы, что на Рву) called the Cathedral of St.Basil the Blessed? The common Western translations Cathedral of Basil the Blessed and Saint Basil's Cathedral incorrectly bestow the status of cathedral on the church of Basil, but are nevertheless widely used even in academic literature.

The structure which so many of us, myself included, call the Cathedral of St.Basil (the Blessed) was built as a monument to a major turning point in Russian history, the defeat of the Kazan Khanate (1552-1554). After each major victory, a small wooden church was erected near the Trinity Church which already stood here. Thus, by the end of the war, there were eight churches on this site. After the final victory, Ivan the Terrible, on the advice of Metropolitan Makary, ordered stone churches to be built in place of the wooden ones.

Designed by the architects and master builders Postnik and Barma. They were commissioned by the Tsar Ivan to do the job and when all was completed they had created a monument whose composition had no parallel in the entire history of world architecture. They built eight pillarlike churches on a single foundation, placed symmetrically round the center chapel (the ninth), central pillar crowned with a tentlike roof. Two additional annexes were added later for a total of eleven. It is called Pokrovsky Sobor in Russian, which literally means the Cathedral of the Intercession of the Virgin.


ila_rendered


Above: From the Brian McMorrow collection is the set of plans for the Cathedral design. Interestingly, it was only in the 1970s when doing restorations that craftsmen found a hidden spiral staircase leading to what at that time was an unknown small chapel!

The vividly coloured, onion-shaped domes of St Basil’s Cathedral are undoubtedly one of Russia’s most famous images. Situated in Moscow’s Red Square, each dome has a distinctive patterning and colour scheme, creating a stunning, fantastical effect, reminiscent of whipped meringue.

The cathedral retained its original shape until 1588, when a tenth church was added over of the grave of the holy fool Basil (Vasily) the Blessed, after whom the cathedral is now known. Basil, who died in 1552, was a well-known prophet who wandered the streets of Moscow and predicted, correctly, that there would be a fire in the city in 1547.
 
Ever since, the Cathedral has been known as the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed. It has been a branch of the State Historical Museum since 1929.


ila_rendered


Originally an apprentice shoemaker in Moscow, Basil adopted an eccentric lifestyle of shoplifting and giving to the poor to shame the miserly and help those in need. He went naked and weighed himself down with chains. He rebuked Ivan the Terrible for not paying attention in church, and for his violent behaviour towards the innocent.

When Basil died on August 2, 1552 or 1557, St. Macarius, Metropolitan of Moscow, served his funeral with many clergy. Ivan the Terrible himself acted as pallbearer and helped carry his coffin to the burial. He is buried in a side chapel of the Moscow Cathedral which has over time gradually taken on his name. Basil was formally canonized as an Orthodox saint around 1580. His feast day is celebrated on August 2.


Photo credits:
- Russian State Historical Museum
- Michau
- Brian McMorrow

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #89 on: November 26, 2009, 12:50:49 AM »
ila_rendered




ila_rendered





С Новым Годом! (Happy New Year!) St Basil's is one of the focal points of the annual New Year's Eve celebrations on Red Square.



ila_rendered

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #90 on: November 26, 2009, 08:50:47 AM »
Today there are really 11 churches in one: 10 chapels built around the core of the original Trinity church. Trinity was the original name of the church before it was rebuilt of stone. The 10th chapel is an annex. The tenth sanctuary, dedicated to Basil Fool for Christ (1460s–1552), was added in 1588 next to the north-eastern sanctuary of the Three Patriarchs. Another local fool, Ivan the Blessed, was buried on the church grounds in 1589; a sanctuary in his memory was established in 1672 inside the south-eastern arcade.

In 1908 the cathedral received its first warm air heating system, which did not work well due to heat losses in long air ducts, and only heated the eastern and northern sanctuaries. In 1913 it was complemented with a pumped water heating system serving the rest of the cathedral.





Almost destroyed by the Soviets!

In 1918 the communist authorities shot the church's senior priest, Ioann Vostorgov, confiscated its property, melted down its bells and closed the cathedral with the idea to blow it up sometime in the future. It remained closed but was spared for the time being.

By the early 1930's the cathedral became an obstacle for Joseph Stalin's plans for grand parades on Red Square. Moscow Communist party boss Lazar Kaganovich was known at the time as "the moving spirit behind the reconstruction of the capital" and one day Stalin's master planner/architect Vladimir Semyonov reputedly dared to grab Stalin's elbow when the leader picked up a model of the cathedral to see how Red Square would look without it. Stalin, shocked at the prospect of the missing Cathedral reputedly shouted, ""Lazar, put it back, put it back!"

Lazar Kaganovich was soon fired and replaced. Ironically however, another man, Pyotr Baranovsky had previously been arrested and was sitting in a cold Siberian Gulag for objecting to the proposed demolition. In the spring of 1939 the cathedral was locked up because demolition was again an open topic on the agenda of planners, but by this time public opinion had been aroused and planners relented.


Almost destroyed by the French!

Legend has it that Napoleon was so impressed with St. Basil's that he wanted it dismantled to take it back to Paris with him, but lacking to the technology to do so, ordered instead that it be destroyed with the French retreat from the city. French engineers set up kegs of gunpowder and lit their fuses, but a sudden rain shower extinguished the fuses and prevented the explosion.




ila_rendered


Mendeleyev has spent considerable time inside St Basil's, the last time in a private media tour displaying the last round of renovations which was completed in September 2008 with the opening of the restored sanctuary of St. Alexander Svirsky.

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #91 on: November 26, 2009, 10:04:16 AM »
Below: Mrs. Mendeleyeva's painting of 'Saint Basil's on the Square.'








Below: side views of Saint Basil's.








Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #92 on: November 26, 2009, 12:41:05 PM »
The extravagant and brightly colored domes of the cathedral's exterior mask a much more modestly decorated. Small dimly lit chapels and maze-like corridors fill the inside of the church and the walls are covered with delicate floral designs in subdued pastel colors dating from the 17th century.









Visitors can climb up a narrow, wooden spiral staircase, set in one of the walls and discovered only in the 1970s during restoration work, and marvel at the Chapel of the Intercession's priceless iconostasis, dating back to the 16th century.










There was so little room inside the church to accommodate worshippers, that on special feast days services were held outside on Red Square where the clergy communicated their sermons to the milling masses from Lobnoye Mesto, using St. Basil's as an outdoor altar.






ila_rendered


So, where in all this maze of small chapels connected into one large structure, is Saint Basil buried? Right there. You're looking at his grave in the bottom photo. That small room is St Basil's Chapel and the large stone/metal tomb which dominates the right side of this small room is where Saint Basil lies today. Those metal hanging stands hold incense which is lit on special Orthodox feast days.

We are only able to see this photograph because it was taken on an official photo tour with lighting set up by the Russian Historical Museum staff. Normally the lighting in this chapel, and the other chapels, is so dim that photos usually don't develop. Except on official museum media days, flash photography inside the Cathedral is strictly prohibited.

Several of these come from the excellent Brian McMorrow collection at http://www.pbase.com/bmcmorrow/moscowstbasils&page=all.

Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #93 on: November 26, 2009, 03:22:56 PM »
One of the best photographers of Moscow is a non-Russian, Brian McMorrow. We'll showcase a few of his photos here, giving proper credit but I'd encourage you to visit his website which is packed with some of the best St Basil's photos anywhere I've seen.


Visit Brian McMorrow at http://www.pbase.com/bmcmorrow/moscowstbasils&page=all


Sampling from that collection



















Offline mendeleyev

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« Reply #94 on: November 26, 2009, 03:32:39 PM »
Can you see and feel the Eastern influence?























Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #95 on: November 29, 2009, 11:38:04 PM »
When we first approached St Basil's Cathedral from the main entrance of Red Square you probably noticed a statue of two men just outside the Cathedral. The monument to Minin and Pozharsky (памятник Минину и Пожарскому) is a bronze statue on Red Square of Moscow right in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral.

The statue commemorates prince Dmitry Pozharsky and Kuzma Minin, who gathered the all-Russian volunteer army and expelled the Poles from the Moscow Kremlin, thus putting an end to the Time of Troubles in 1612.


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In the small garden outside St. Basil's stands an impressive bronze Statue to Minin and Pozharsky, who rallied Russia's volunteer army during the Time of Troubles and drove out the invading Polish forces. They were an interesting duo - Dmitry Pozharsky was a prince, while Kuzma Minin was a butcher from Nizhny Novgorod.





Guarding Moscow in all sorts of weather.

The statue was designed by the artist I. Martos and erected in 1818 as the city's first monumental sculpture. It originally stood in the center of Red Square in front of what is now the GUM Department Store, with Minin symbolically indicating to Pozharsky that the Poles were occupying the Kremlin and calling for its liberation.

The Soviet authorities felt that the statue had become an obstacle during parades and after the construction of the Lenin Mausoleum Red Square, its position was considered rather ambiguous and was eventually moved to the garden in front of St. Basil's in 1936.

Now they have an incredible view of the GUM shopping plaza!





On the first celebration of the Day of People's Unity (04 November 2005) a near exact copy of this monument by Zurab Tsereteli was erected in Nizhny Novgorod. The copy is only 5 cm shorter than the Moscow original.

Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #96 on: November 29, 2009, 11:46:35 PM »
Don't misbehave on Red Square--they're watching!  :)






Trivia question--in the sign on the monument Minin and Pozharsky there is a Cyrillic letter that while remaining in the Ukrainian and Belarussian languages, has been eliminated from the Russian cyrillic. Which letter is it?






Next on the RUA tour of Moscow: The Kremlin Necropolis (tombs) along the wall towers.

Offline Jared2151

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #97 on: November 30, 2009, 10:23:50 AM »

   Mendy,

   WOW !!!   Thank you for such an excellent article on St. basil's, errrrr.... Church of Intercession of Theotokos on the Moat .

   I don't know why but, for some reason, I assumed that it was all one building.  I did
not know that it was a collection of separate churches.  The article, as well as the photographs, are top notch.  You do an excellent job of bringing us newbies up to speed.

Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #98 on: November 30, 2009, 01:36:58 PM »
Thank you Jared. It is one building, sort of, just not all of the chapels at one time.  :chuckle:

It's a beautiful landmark with such a storied history! Glad you are enjoying the tour.

Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #99 on: December 02, 2009, 12:23:59 PM »
Our earlier trivia question was: --On the sign on the monument Minin and Pozharsky there is a Cyrillic letter that while remaining in the Ukrainian and Belarussian languages, has been eliminated from the Russian cyrillic. Which letter is it?


Россия is how Russia is spelled today.

The sign uses an earlier Cyrillic letter which has since been dropped in a streamlining of the Russian alphabet.

The sign below reads Россiя.






Both И и and І і are present in the Ukrainian version of the Cyrillic. Belarussian omits the И и in favour of the І і. Both letters are used in the Rusyn language spoken in Carpathian Ruthenia (what is now part of Ukraine and Romania), and small enclaves in Slovakia, and Poland, and Serbia.


The inscription on the monument reads: “To Citizen Minin and Prince Pozharsky from a grateful Russia."