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Author Topic: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan  (Read 2186 times)

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Online andrewfi

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2018, 07:07:09 AM »
I am sure that the moderators will manage this thread in their usual deft manner and so your input on my posting is not really necessary, but thanks for your consideration.

Have you considered the effects of paying this woman to be with you? Are those effects desired by you? And she?

And, yes, you are right, I only know that which you told us:
"She and her son are now totally dependent upon me as at my request she resigned from her job in order to spend time with me."

As a fellow native English speaker, I'd be eager to understand how your words were not congruent with the point I was making. If you have considered the effect of persuading this woman to give up her career and to rely upon you for everything she needs for herself and son, in material matters at the least then that's great and there's no reason for you to get bent out of shape about my comment because you have already considered the issue and managed it.

However, if you have not given this issue any thought then (1) you really should and (2) I have done no more than might be expected of a fellow poster on a public forum and alerted you to an issue that you had overlooked. and (3) as a public forum there are more readers than just you and I and those reading might be reminded to think of the implications of doing as you are doing and accounting for the issues in their own planning.

By the way, I think you were confused about whose posts you had been reading. I have never suggested that you will end up back with your wife. Are you yet divorced? I was pointing out that entering into a relationship with another woman before you were even divorced was likely to not be a long-term affair because that's what tends to happen. Now that you have reminded me of my earlier post I can only say WTF are you thinking! Binding a woman and her son to you when you are not even in a position to carry through with your goals and so soon after the end of a very significant relationship with all the emotional weight that entails.

So, I will happily keep irrelevant comments to myself and continue to post in a relevant manner, according to my own judgment and conscience.
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Online AvHdB

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2018, 07:11:38 AM »
Collloc, Please take a deep breath and calm down. Andrew's post is typical of his posting style, get used to it. To help give a reasonable reply, a couple questions.

How old is the son?

Can you find employment elsewhere in the EU? Besides teaching English can you work in Ukraine?

Is your bride employable outside Ukraine?
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Offline Colloc

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2018, 07:19:47 AM »
I'd be taking it easy on the marriage plans if you ain't divorced yet. This one's likely to end up being a rebound thing. Bad news to get married and then discover that's the case.

I'd not be getting anyone's head messed up with ideas of getting married at this moment.

Yeah, I know that you asked about visas but this point rather stood out as begging to be mentioned.

I rest my case and will not get involved in any further correspondence not pertaining to my question
I have been separated for over a year, I didn't realise there was a specific time frame I had to adhere to.
She can return at any time and is able to support herself in her own apartment and drive her own car


Offline Colloc

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2018, 07:29:26 AM »
Collloc, Please take a deep breath and calm down. Andrew's post is typical of his posting style, get used to it. To help give a reasonable reply, a couple questions.

How old is the son?

Can you find employment elsewhere in the EU? Besides teaching English can you work in Ukraine?

Is your bride employable outside Ukraine?


Hello,
The son has just turned 5, and yes I could work abroad.
I work in the Oil and Gas industry and there are opportunities within the EU also Baku.
Ideally we would like to stay in the UK and I can get the son into schooling. We have a fee paying international school nearby that would be ideal.

I have taken a deep breath but something that makes my blood boil is when you ask one question and the response is completely off topic.
If I ask someone what is the time, I don't need to know what the weather is!

Online andrewfi

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2018, 07:40:40 AM »
OK, so English is not your native language. Thanks for clearing that up.
A couple of points; a rebound relationship is one that occurs, typically, immediately after the end of a previous significant relationship. Usually, such a relationship is not long term due to the emotional issues related to the breakup of the previous relationship. The term has no meaning associated with getting back together with the previous person (wife, girlfriend, whatever)

Secondly, when we use, in English, the term totally dependent as in "totally dependent upon me" it means that the person or animal being referred to is 100% reliant upon the writer (or speaker) for all aspects of their life. I had assumed that in the context you were mainly referring to financial affairs. Often in relationships, this is not considered to be an unalloyed benefit to the overall health of the relationship.

Stepping aside from the English lesson for a moment; it seems odd that she is not totally dependent upon you and yet, at the same time is not. A few years ago a bloke in a not dissimilar position to yourself insisted that he would be supporting the woman after they split up. Of course, they split up. I hope that your predecessor followed through upon his commitment.

No need to reply, I hope that I have been able to help you with the furtherance of your English as second language skills.
...everything ends always well; if it’s still bad, then it’s not the end!

Online AvHdB

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2018, 07:53:01 AM »
Colloc, Lets us assume your are an OIM and not a 'roughneck' most likely you can find employment abroad and bring your spouse/bride and child with you. I would go for it, though your partner may not be happy living in Baku, a Muslim country.

But you are dodging the initial issue as far as I can see that you have not been granted a decree of divorce.

The comments that Andrew makes, especially regarding a 'rebound relationship' have merit and are worth considering.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online rosco

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2018, 09:46:15 AM »
Andrew,
Kindly keep your irrelevant comments to yourself.
You have made a judgement based on so little information and contributed nothing pertaining to my question.
You have no understanding of our relationship or the background and support she has.
You have previously posted on this thread that I was on the rebound and that I would end up back with my wife.
In my opinion, your input is irrelevant and unless you have something to contribute, go elsewhere.

To be fair Colloc, I found Andrews comments to be completely relevant. You may not have enjoyed reading them but it is correct of him to point out the obvious, given what you posted.

We get to understand your relationship and situation from what you tell us but I'm guessing you only wanted answers to the visa questions and not the elephant in the corner?

Offline Colloc

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #37 on: October 01, 2018, 09:48:37 AM »
Rosco,
It's OK I have Andrew on ignore.
When I need relationship advice, I know where to avoid.

Yes my question was regarding the visa issue which to date no one has responded

Offline Gipsy

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #38 on: October 01, 2018, 09:52:21 AM »
Sorry but I am struggling to get my head around a few things.
You start a relationship with someone from another country outside the EU.
You very quickly realise that you are ideal for each other and would like to be together
As with any relationship you need time to get to know each other and only time will tell if your really are compatible.
The UK authorities don’t really recognise a relationship of less than 2 years and I can understand the logic in that, so with the current visa guidelines a visitor shouldn’t spend anymore than 50% of their 6 month visa in this country.
I am trying to work out what to do next, girlfriend will soon be coming up to the end of her latest visit.
This is her 2nd visit having previously been here for 3 weeks and now 4 weeks this time. So far she has spent 7 weeks with me, so how long should I plan for her next flights? I guess she only can stay another 6 weeks in the UK on her current visa?
She and her son are now totally dependent upon me as at my request she resigned from her job in order to spend time with me.


When was that enforced??


She must return home to apply for the next visa.


What are her chances of getting another visa?


I believe that she must prove "Reason to return", which, without a job may cause her some difficulty..
Bridge is a lot like sex, either you need a good partner, or a decent hand... Woody Allen

Online rosco

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #39 on: October 01, 2018, 09:56:17 AM »
So when you say the Uk authority doesn't recognise a relationship of less than 2 years, where did you read this and what visa application was it for? My wife and I knew each other for less than a year before we got married yet we successfully got a visitors visa and then a spouse visa without problem.

I also wasn't aware of the 50% rule but I would hazard a guess that my wife spent much longer than that in country on multiple visits. We never had a problem.

This is going back 5/6 years ago.

Online AvHdB

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #40 on: October 01, 2018, 10:06:33 AM »
Rosco,
It's OK I have Andrew on ignore.
When I need relationship advice, I know where to avoid.

Yes my question was regarding the visa issue which to date no one has responded

1) Andrew knows suff, I would not put him on ignore. You do not need to agree just consider his point of view.

2) I think there is confusion to your question. Why not rephrase in light on your current situation?
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online Steveboy

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #41 on: October 01, 2018, 10:08:47 AM »
I have suggested this before!

Have you ever thought of having your wife , like  knocked on the head kind of saying? I can send you some links? Prices go from $500-1000

But try to stay away from any Russian hit man, they usually do sloppy jobs.. :ROFL:
I support no government anywhere, ever, never. No institution, No religion!!

Offline Colloc

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #42 on: October 01, 2018, 10:16:16 AM »
Frequent or successive visits: how to assess if an
applicant is making the UK their main home or place of
work
 
See: paragraph V 4.2(b) of appendix V: visitor rules.
 
You should check the applicant’s travel history, including how long they are spending
in the UK and how frequently they are returning. You must assess if they are, in
effect, making the UK their main home.
 
 You should look at:
 
• the purpose of the visit and intended length of stay stated
• the number of visits made over the past 12 months, including the length of stay
on each occasion, the time elapsed since the last visit, and if this amounts to
the individual spending more time in the UK than in their home country
• the purpose of return trips to the visitor’s home country and if this is used only
to seek re-entry to the UK
• the links they have with their home country - consider especially any long term
commitments and where the applicant is registered for tax purposes
• evidence the UK is their main place of residence, for example:
o if they have registered with a general practitioner (GP)
o if they send their children to UK schools
• the history of previous applications, for example if the visitor has previously
been refused under the family rules and subsequently wants to enter as a
visitor you must assess if they are using the visitor route to avoid the rules in
place for family migrants joining British or settled persons in the UK
 
There is no specified maximum period which an individual can spend in the UK in
any period such as ‘6 months in 12 months’. However, if it is clear from an
individual’s travel history that they are making the UK their home you should refuse
their application.   

source
Page 17 of 65  Published for Home Office staff on 11 January 2018
 
 

Online Wiz

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #43 on: October 01, 2018, 11:27:11 AM »
Frequent or successive visits: how to assess if an
applicant is making the UK their main home or place of
work
 
See: paragraph V 4.2(b) of appendix V: visitor rules.
 
You should check the applicant’s travel history, including how long they are spending
in the UK and how frequently they are returning. You must assess if they are, in
effect, making the UK their main home.
 
 You should look at:
 
• the purpose of the visit and intended length of stay stated
• the number of visits made over the past 12 months, including the length of stay
on each occasion, the time elapsed since the last visit, and if this amounts to
the individual spending more time in the UK than in their home country
• the purpose of return trips to the visitor’s home country and if this is used only
to seek re-entry to the UK
• the links they have with their home country - consider especially any long term
commitments and where the applicant is registered for tax purposes
• evidence the UK is their main place of residence, for example:
o if they have registered with a general practitioner (GP)
o if they send their children to UK schools
• the history of previous applications, for example if the visitor has previously
been refused under the family rules and subsequently wants to enter as a
visitor you must assess if they are using the visitor route to avoid the rules in
place for family migrants joining British or settled persons in the UK
 
There is no specified maximum period which an individual can spend in the UK in
any period such as ‘6 months in 12 months’. However, if it is clear from an
individual’s travel history that they are making the UK their home you should refuse
their application.
   

source
Page 17 of 65  Published for Home Office staff on 11 January 2018

It is pretty obvious from your post above, that Mrs May while she was at the Home Office, she changed and tighten the rules in an effort, ...

"To catch all illegal immigrants ..... (she said in an interview at LBC radio) so she will not apologise for the damage made to the WindRush People".

The last paragraph says it all. They give the right to the Visa Officer to decide......in his opinion........to grand a visa or not!

I would suggest... that you let her stay in her country more than 6 months before applying for a new visa. If you are desperate to see her... you can always visit her ...... Remember if you she get a refusal...... then you will have too many problems.... to overcome.

What is your Nationality Please?

 tiphat

Online dcguyusa

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Re: Best chance of a successful long term visa plan
« Reply #44 on: October 01, 2018, 06:16:05 PM »
Quote
The UK authorities don’t really recognise a relationship of less than 2 years and I can understand the logic in that, so with the current visa guidelines a visitor shouldn’t spend anymore than 50% of their 6 month visa in this country.
I am trying to work out what to do next, girlfriend will soon be coming up to the end of her latest visit.
This is her 2nd visit having previously been here for 3 weeks and now 4 weeks this time. So far she has spent 7 weeks with me, so how long should I plan for her next flights? I guess she only can stay another 6 weeks in the UK on her current visa?

I am not familiar with UK immigration rules, but from what you posted, the visitor should not spend over half of the visa validity period in the visiting country.  That sounds about right that she would need to stay about another 6 weeks on her current visa.  For foreign visitors to the USA, they frown on visitors staying in this country for extended periods of time.  There is an implication that the visitor intends to remain possibly permanently (without approval) in this country.  I know several cases where this has happened in my area.  One guy came to this country as a student and finished his studies and did not leave.  When he had to return to his home country, immigration caught him violating the visa and blocked his return.  He had to wait many years before he could get approved again.
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