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Author Topic: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva  (Read 27623 times)

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Offline mendeleyev

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Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« on: April 17, 2008, 12:31:25 AM »
Moscow (Москва)


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Welcome to the biggest city in Europe!  It is located on the Moskva River in the Central Federal District, in the European part of Russia. Historically, it was the capital of the former Soviet Union and the Grand Duchy of Moscow and Tsardom of Russia, the pre-Imperial Russian states. It is the site of the Moscow Kremlin, which serves as the ceremonial residence of the President of Russia and the Russian parliament.


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There are lots of things to see and do in Moscow so in this thread we'll explore and give you some ideas for travel.

The Novodevichy ('New Maiden') Convent, also known as Bogoroditse-Smolensky Monastery (Новоде́вичий монасты́рь, Богоро́дице-Смоле́нский монасты́рь) is probably the best-known cloister of Moscow. Its name, sometimes translated as the New Maidens' Monastery, was devised to differ from an ancient maidens' convent in the Moscow Kremlin. Unlike other Moscow cloisters, it has remained virtually intact since the 17th century. In 2004, it was proclaimed a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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The Novodevichy Pond is very lovely. In the winter this is a favorite place for skating and sledging. Brass ducks by the pond were given by Barbara Bush "to the children of Russia" but later stolen by thieves. They have since been replaced.


The Novodevichy Convent was founded in 1524 by Tsar Vasily III (1479-1533) to commemoratethe capture of Smolensk from Lithuania. That it was intended to serve not only as a religious institution but also as a fortress is evident from its strategic location and strong wall with 12 battle towers. Until the 20 th century, the convent marked Moscow's southern edge.

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Having been founded by the tsar, it enjoyed an elevated position among the many monasteries and convents of Moscow and became a convent primarily for ladies of noble birth. It was also used as a prison for rebellious royals, including Peter the Great's half-sister and his first wife.

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Little remains of the original structure. Most of the current building dates from the 1680s, when the convent was significantly rebuilt and enhanced after the Time of Troubles by the Regent Sofia. Sofia was later confined here by Peter the Great along with his unwanted first wife.

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After the Revolution, Novodevichy's churches were closed and in 1922 it was turned into a museum. This spared it from a worse fate until the cathedral was returned to the Russian Orthodox Church as a reward for backing the war effort in 1945.

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Restoration of the convent began in the 1960s and in 1988 an episcopal see was once again established here. It is still officially a museum, but is used as a convent by nuns who keep a low profile.

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Some of the famous Russians buried there are:
Nadezhda Alliluyeva-Stalin, (1902–1932), "First Lady" of the Soviet Union
Pavel Belyayev, (1925–1970), cosmonaut
Georgi Beregovoi, (1921–1995), cosmonaut
Sergei Bondarchuk, (1920–1994), actor/director
Boris Bruinov, (1922–1997), actor
Valery Bryusov, (1873–1924), writer
Mikhail Bulgakov, (1881–1940), playwright and author
Nikolai Bulganin, (1895–1975), statesman
Anton Chekhov, (1860–1904), writer
Georgi Chicherin (1872–1936), statesman
Fyodor Chaliapin, (1873–1938), opera singer
Ilya Ehrenburg, (1891–1967), writer
Alexander Fadeyev, (1901–1956), writer
Nikolai Gogol, (1809–1852), writer
Raisa Gorbachev, (1932–1999), "First Lady" of the Soviet Union
Nikita Khrushchev, (1894–1971), statesman
Peter Kropotkin, (1842–1921), Russia's foremost anarchist
Alexander Lebed, (1950–2002), soldier and politician
Lev Davidovich Landau, (1908–1968), Nobel laureate in Physics
Isaac Levitan, (1860–1900), painter
Vladimir Mayakovsky, (1893–1930), poet
Vyacheslav Molotov, (1890–1986), politician
Nikolai Ogaryov, (1813–1877), writer/poet
David Oistrakh, (1908–1974), violin virtuoso
Aleksandr Oparin, (1894–1980), scientist
Boris Polevoy, (1908–1981), writer
Sergei Prokofiev, (1891–1953), composer
Valentin Serov, (1865–1911), writer and artist
Dmitri Shostakovich, (1906–1975), composer
Vasily Shukshin, (1929–1974), writer, actor


[ Guests cannot view attachments ]   Grave of Nikita Khrushchev who was under house arrest from the time he was desposed until his death.  He was denied burial in the Kremlin wall and instead was buried in a private ceremony at New Maiden Convent cemetery.  KGB agents attended his funeral, noting and photographing friends of the Khrushchev family who attended the burial.


Quick Facts
Address: 1 Novodevichy proyezd, Moscow, Russia
Type of site:  Christian monastery 
Faith: Russian Orthodox 
Date: Founded 1524 
Status: Officially a museum, but actively used by resident nuns 
Location: Krasnaya Presnya, Moscow
Phone: 095/246-8526 or 095/246-2201
Metro: Sportivnaya
Hours: Museum: Thurs.-Tues. 10-5; Convent: daily 10-6; closed last Mon. of month.
Cost: $5
Tip: Sometimes it is possible to catch a Russian Orthodox service in the cathedral. Women should cover their heads before entering.   Under no circumstances should men or women enter an Orthodox Church in walking shorts or tank tops or open-toe sandals.

(Source:  Wikipedia)


Offline mendeleyev

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The Kremlin
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2008, 01:23:35 AM »
Московский Кремль (Mos-KOV-skiy KREM-el) The Kremlin

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The primary spots within the Kremlin:
-Armoury Chamber
-Assumption Cathedral
-Archangel’s Cathedral
-Annunciation Cathedral
-Church of Laying Our Lady’s Holy Robe
-Patriarch’s Palace
-Twelve Apostles’ Church
-Ivan the Great Bell-Tower complex
-the collection of artillery arms and bells.


Video Presentation:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LJuXp5IucQ

Offline mendeleyev

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Moscow
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2008, 10:22:41 PM »
The Armoury: This is a collection of world-renowned treatures displaying ancient Russian regalia, ceremonial tsar's dress, church hierarchs' vestments, gold and silverware by Russian, European and Eastern masters, arms and armouries, royal carriages and horse ceremonial harness sets.  Historians around the world laud this museum's exhibits because of precious materials, high artistic level and their particular value for the history and culture of the Russian State.

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The Assumption Cathedral:  The Cathedral of the Assumption or also known as Cathedral of the Dormition (Uspensky Sobor (Успенский Собор) is one of several churches in Moscow's Kremlin. It was built between 1475 and 1479 AD by the Italian architect Aristotele Fioravanti. 

In the 14th century, Metropolitan Peter persuaded Ivan I (Ivan Kalita) that he should build a cathedral to the Holy Virgin in Moscow like the Cathedral of the Assumption in the capital city Vladimir. Construction of the cathedral began on August 4, 1326. In the following year, Moscow became the capital of the Vladimir-Suzdal' principality, and later of all Rus.

This is the royal place where Tsars have been inaugurated and coronations of Emperors have taken place here.  In this Catheral Bishops, Metropolitans and Patriarchs were crowned thru the centuries of the Russian Orthodox Church.

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The Archangel's Cathedral: This is one of the most important of the Kremlin Churches for early Russian history.  Many of the early Moscow Great Princes and Tsars were crowned and buried here.  Great Princes Ivan Kalita, Dmitriy Donskoi, Ivan III, Ivan the Terrible, tsarevich Dmitriy, Tsars Mikhail and Alexey Romanov were in this ancient Cathedral. There are 47 tombstones and 2 reliquaries.  The cathedral's pillars and walls are covered with portraits of Moscow leaders and their glorious ancestors. In the local row of the iconostasis one can see the ancient image of the "Archangel Michael with glorious works", created in the time of the Battle on the Kulikovo Field, dating back to the year 1333.

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Video Presentation:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcX7hmYSWUo


Offline mendeleyev

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Moscow Annunciation:
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2008, 10:54:15 PM »
The Cathedral of the Annunciation: (Благовещенский собор) is a cathedral dedicated to the Annunciation of the Theotokos.  "Theotokos" is the greek term for the Virgin Mary.

For many years the cathedral was the home church of the Tsars. Its abbot has been a personal confessor of the royal family until the early 20th century. The Cathedral of the Annunciation was built on the Sobornaya Square (Cathedral Square) by architects from Pskov in 1484-1489. It was erected on the spot of an older 14th century cathedral of the same name, which had been rebuilt in 1416.

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The Church of Laying Our Lady’s Holy Robe:  Also known as the Church of the Deposition of the Robe (Церковь Ризоположения) is a church which stands on Cathedral Square in the Moscow Kremlin.  It was begun in 1484 by masters from Pskov, most likely by the same group of architects who built the adjacent Cathedral of the Annunciation. 
The church was built on the site of a previous church, built by Jonah Metropolitan of Moscow in 1451

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The Ivan the Great Bell-Tower complex: The Bell-Tower was erected in 1505-1508 by Italian architect Bon Friazin. A century later another one arcade for bells was added to the Bell-Tower so that its total height achieved 81 m. The memorial inscription under the dome includes this information, the year of 1600 and the names of Tsar Boris Godunov and his son Fyodor.

In 1532-1552, a new church was built near the Bell-Tower on the project of Italian architect Petrok Maliy. In late XVII century it was dismantled and transformed into a belfry named Uspenskaya (Assumption). In 1624, Bazhen Ogurtsov (Cucumber) added to the Uspenskaya another one belfry with a marquee-top - the Filaret’s Annex.

In 1812, while retreating from Moscow, the Napoleon’s Army blew up the Ivan the Great Bell-Tower ensemble. However, the pillar of the bell-tower survived. The Belfry and the Filaret’s Annex were completely destroyed and restored in original dimensions in 1814-1815.

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Offline mendeleyev

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Moscow Twelve
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2008, 11:00:23 PM »
The Church of the Twelve Apostles:  (церковь Двенадцати Апостолов) is a minor cathedral of the Moscow Kremlin, commissioned by Patriarch Nikon as part of his stately residence in 1653 and dedicated to Philip the Apostle three years later.

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The Patriarch' Palace:  is part of the beautiful Church of the Twelve Apostles complex.  The Patriarch’s Palace was built in 1653-1655 by Russian craftsmen for Patriarch Nikon. On the palace’s ground floor there were household services, the second floor housed living quarters of the Patriarch. The ceremonial chambers were located on the first floor. The main ceremonial room was the Cross (or Chrism) Chamber where the meetings of the Holy Council and tsar’s and ambassadorial feasts were held. In XVIII-XIX centuries, Moscow Synod Service was situated in the Patriarch’s Chambers.

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Historical and Artistic collections:  There are many regular exhibitions at the Kremlin, representing artworks which were executed during the reign of Ivan the Terrible, the first ruler of Russia who assumed the title of Tsar or to other of the Russian Royal families. The exposition consists of the exhibits from the Kremlin cathedrals, Armoury Chamber and museum funds, i.e. icons, embroideries, works of silversmiths. The display reveals the interaction between art and cultural wealth, when forms and artistic features of items are closely connected to the spiritual feeling and religious subject matter.

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]   The crown of the ruler of Kazan, now Russian.



Video Presentation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=In8DaeDs9KA

Offline mendeleyev

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Moscow
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2008, 11:29:07 PM »
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The Moscow Kremlin: (Московский Кремль) usually referred to as simply The Kremlin, is a historic fortified complex at the heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moscow River to the south, Saint Basil's Cathedral and Red Square to the east and to the west is the Alexander Garden. It is the best known of kremlins (Russian citadels) and includes four palaces, four cathedrals, and the enclosing Kremlin Wall with Kremlin towers.


Video Presentations:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSF3VHwocx4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGHYVCMR25Y

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hDU8WKNTS0



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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2009, 12:53:00 PM »
More to see and do in Moscow:



RUA member MrMann has posted a collection of very nice Moscow photos from one of his trips here: http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php?topic=5773.msg78989#new

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2009, 12:53:20 PM »
Moscow Airports
- Domodedovo  DME
- Sheremetievo  SVO
- Vnukovo  VKO

For airfare and schedule search purposes, you can use the code MOW in any airline program to check flight options to Moscow.



Domodedovo International
Международный Аэропорт Москва-Домодедово is Russian for "Domodedovo International Airport Moscow." Domodedovo is a modern (and again expanding) airport which is now Moscow's largest and busiest.  The airport website is excellent and one of the most user friendly one could hope to encounter.  The home page gives the current time in Moscow and gives departure and arrival status for each flight leaving and arriving that hour. http://www.domodedovo.ru/en/


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Domodedovo allows two ways to check-in for flights.  You may use one of the aisles at the airport or you may also check-in at the terminal of the Paveletskiy railway station in the center of Moscow.


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International flight check-in islands are located to the left from the central entrance to the airport terminal. Domestic flight check-in islands are to the right from the entrance.


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Domodedovo International Airport is Russia's largest airport that holds the leading positions among Moscow area airports in terms of passenger traffic. Overall passenger throughput at Domodedovo in 2006 reached 15.4 million passengers annually.


Layout and virtual tour of Domodedovo: http://www.domodedovo.ru/ru/main/virtual/tour/tour2006/index_eng.html

This is a 4 minute video of the airport in action.  Very nice! http://www.domodedovo.ru/img/uploaded/video/eastlinefilm.wmv



Getting to and from Domodedovo by train, bus or taxi
Aeroexpress trains links Domodedovo non stop to the Paveletsky Rail Terminal in downtown Moscow. The trains run every 60 minutes from 6am to 11pm to the airport, and from 7am to 12am (midnight) to the city, the ride lasts 40 minutes and costs 200 rubles (about 6 Euro). Airline passengers can check in themselves as well as their luggage at the Paveletsky Terminal. This train stops at Nagatinskaya and Warshavskaya metro stations along the way.

Occasional express trains to/from Belorussky Rail Terminal in the city centre via Kursky Rail Terminal and Kalanchevskaya station (60 minutes duration) directly connecting the airport to five of the city's nine railway terminals. There are three trains per day, however the frequency of the service is going to be increased.

Slower regular commuter trains (elektrichka) from/to Paveletsky Terminal are available as well; there are over 10 trains per day, the journey lasts about 80 minutes and the 2008 price was 72 roubles (or about 2 euro).

Public bus # 405: One way fare 4 Rubles and this is the bus which connects the airport and the nearest metro, station Domodedovskaya.  It stops 30 meters away from the metro station entrance and arrives every 10 – 15 minutes. May get overcrowded occasionally and the travel time is 35 – 40 minutes.

Marshrutka (Minibus) Service (маршру́тка) runs on regular schedules between 7am and 9pm and connects the Airport to the Domodedovskaya metro station.  The cost is 30 Rubles plus 8-10 Rubles (depends on size) for each piece of luggage. Leave approximately every 10 minutes. Travel time is about 25 minutes.


Express Bus to the Domodedovskaya metro station and the one way fare 25 Rubles. The express bus comes every 45 – 60 minutes between 6 a.m. thru 11 p.m and the travel time is 25 – 30 minutes.

Express Bus to the Aeroport metro station (connects to the city central bus station) and the one way fare 25 Rubles, each piece of luggage is 3 Rubles. This bus runs every 30 minutes between 5:45 am thru 11:45 pm.



Airport Security:
Watch this video: http://www.domodedovo.ru/en/main/infopass/6/3/flash/





Sheremetievo International Airport
Sheremetievo (Международный аэропорт Шереметьево) is Moscow's best known airport althought it has fallen into second place in terms of annual passengers served.  Terminal 2 was added as an international terminal for the 1980 Olympics. Airport website: http://www.sheremetyevo-airport.ru/?act=part&pid=549


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Sheremetyevo-2 is the largest terminal at the Sheremetyevo International Airport and you will find that it is often filled with the hustle and bustle of international passengers as they make their way to and from the country. There is no physical connection between Sheremetyevo-1 and 2 and most people find it somewhat odd that these two terminals are located in separate buildings. The two are, in fact, essentially separate airports which make use of the same runways.


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Current reconstruction efforts include the opening of a new terminal building – Sheremetyevo 3 – which will hopefully go a long way to improving the service and standards of the Sheremetyevo Airport.


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[ Guests cannot view attachments ] New terminal C at finish. (Thnx Chivo)

 

Getting to and from Sheremetievo Airport:

Express train--air travelers can skip the jams and go to/from Savyolovsky Station, just off the Third Ring Road in north-central Moscow, direct to/from Sheremetyevo in 35 minutes, for a price of 250 rubles ($10.50)

Trains leave from Savyolovsky 24 times per day, at times running a twice-hourly service. Passengers have the option of checking in their luggage at the station and paying 350 rubles for a first-class seat on the train.

You may register for your flight and check in your luggage at the train station just an hour and a half prior to your flight departure, take the thirty-minute train ride, and step on a plane. Enjoy the express-trains and welcome to Moscow!


Public buses #851 and # 817 offer service, sometimes very crowded, for just 4 Rubles one way. 

Bus #851 connects the airport to the nearest metro station Rechnoi Vokzal. Note: This bus makes a circle between Metro Rechnoi Vokzal and Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.  Make sure to get off at the correct terminal!

Bus #817 connects to Metro station Planernaya. These buses rotate every 10 - 15 minutes and the travel time is between 45 - 50 minutes.

Express buses: Sheremetievo Express-Bus (# 851c) goes to the Rechnoi Vokzal metro station travels every 20 minutes between 7 am thru 9:30 pm and the travel time is 20-25 minutes. The fare to SVOII is 60 rubles with another 60 if you want to take your luggage like a passenger from Rechnoi Vokzal.


Marshrutka (Minibus) Service (Avto-Line Bus Service) connects the airport and the nearest metro station Rechnoi Vokzal.  It's not meant for lots of luggage as two or three cumbersome suitcases may cause problems.  The one way fare is 15 - 20 Rubles, and each piece of luggage is 8 or 10 Rubles. Leaves every 10-20 minutes, depending how fast the passengers fill the vehicle and is available between 7 am and 10pm.

Marshrutka minibuses for Aeroport and Planernaya metro stations are also available. The journey time 40-50 minutes.






Vnukovo Airport
Международный аэропорт Внуково (Vnukovo International Airport) is the oldest of the operating airports in Moscow. The construction was approved by the Soviet government in 1937, since the older Khodynka Airport (located much closer to the city centre and closed by 1980s) was overloaded. Vnukovo was opened on July 1, 1941. The airport website is http://www.vnukovo.ru/eng/about/


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During the Great Patriotic War Vnukovo airport served as a military airbase, and then the passenger service started. Today it handles mostly domestic flights. The airport has recently been modernized and construction will soon begin on the new International terminal A at Vnukovo.


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Getting to and from Vnukovo Airport

Express train service offers direct a speed line connecting Vnukovo Airport with Kiyevsky Rail Terminal downtown Moscow with a total travel time of 35 minutes. The express is a comfortable commuter train with cushioned three-by-two abreast airline-style seating and ample carry-on baggage space to zoom you to the Airport in half an hour’s time and deposit you on an underground station’s platform with escalator- and elevator-equipped exits.


Public bus # 611. The one way fare is 4 Rubles and this bus connects the airport to the nearest metro station Yugo-Zapadnaja. This bus runs every 10 – 15 minutes and may get overcrowded occasionally. Travel time is 25 – 30 minutes.


Express Bus to the Yugo-Zapadnaja metro station with a one way fare of 10 Rubles, and each piece of luggage is 1 Ruble. This runs every 20 minutes between 7am and 9pm with a travel time of 20-25 minutes.

Express Bus  to the Aeroport metro station with a one way fare of 20 Rubles, each piece of luggage is 3 Rubles and at 20 minute intervals these run between 7am and 9pm with a travel time of 80 minutes.


Marshrutka (Minibus) Service is on (Avtoline Bus # 45) with a one way fare of 15 Rubles, and each piece of luggage 8 Rubles.  This Marshrutka connects the airport and the nearest metro station Yugo-Zapadnaja.





For Russian airport Security/Visa-Passport Control/Customs information, click here: http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php/topic,4901.msg65260.html#msg65260

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2009, 12:53:44 PM »
Getting around Moscow


The heart of Moscow, the capital of Russia, is the Kremlin where everything started centuries ago. Heading out from the Kremlin, the city has expanded in a series of circles; the Boulevard Ring, the Garden Ring and the Moscow Automobile Ring Road (MKAD) which acts as a rough boundary around Moscow. Keeping the city layout in mind, helps you to get orientated.

With over 12 million people calling Moscow home, its important not to underestimate travel times or distances. The public transportation consists of an extremely efficient and fantastically ornate metro concentrated in the city centre, a spider's web of trains running to all corners of the country and local buses, trolleybuses and a few marshrutkas (fixed route mini-vans.)



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Buses/Trolleys/Trams
The bus, trolleybus and tram network functions under the same ticketing system. Buy tickets from the small kiosks near bus stations for 17Rbl a single ticket, 5 trips for 83Rbl, 10 for 165Rbl and 20 trips will set you back 325Rbl. The operating company is caled Mosgortrans. These types of transport are definitely for those with times on their hand, it is just more convenient to go by metro.  If you buy your ticket onboard, it cost more, a single ticket costs 25Rbl. 

The public transport system works from 5:30 until 1:00. The bus stops are yellow plates marked with "A" signs; trolleys' have white plates with "T" and trams' with "Tp". There are no night buses or trolleys or trams. If you're late, you can only take a taxi.

Prices are the same for buses, trolleys and trams: one trip costs 17 R ($0.75) if you buy the ticket from the driver, or 15 R ($0.60) if you buy the ticket beforehand. You can buy them from the driver directly, in metro stations, or from the kiosks located near the busier bus stops.

Almost all Moscow transport has now been fitted with turnstiles where you have to stick your ticket into a machine to pass through. This means you now have to enter through the front door, creating long queues for boarding, and it also means that fare evasion is no longer possible.





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Marshrutka
Marshrutka are the little minibus shuttles. They usually have the same numbers as the buses or trolleys and go the same route. If you see an approaching shuttle just wave it down like a taxi. You must pay for a trip from 15 R ($0.60) to the driver. When you are near your stop just say aloud to the driver where to stop. He will understand if you just say "Stop!"






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By Taxi
Many Moscow drivers are happy to go a little bit out of their way for a few extra rubles, so taxis are cheap. Just stick your arm out on any big street and a driver will stop.

Name your destination and then agree on a fare -- the better your Russian the lower the price. A five-minute ride is generally $3 to $5 and $12 to $20 should get you across the city.

If you don't want to ride in a gypsy cab you can find more expensive registered taxis waiting around train stations, hotels and big intersections.

It's generally best to agree on the fare beforehand, as even the registered cabs rarely use meters (and when they do, it can sometimes be even more expensive). Use common sense when getting into a vehicle - if you don't like the look of someone, or don't want to get in a car with more than one person in it already, just say no and wait for the next one.

Maryino is the largest taxi company in Moscow, operating 24 hours a day (phone 495-927-0000). Other reputable companies include Krasnaya Gorka (phone 495-381-2746), RS-Key (phone 495-938-7930), Taxi Service (phone 495-203-0247) and Taxi-Blues (phone 495-105-5115; http://www.taxi-blues.ru).

 




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By Metro

RUA's most complete guide to how to ride the metro can be found here, http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php/topic,3320.msg39382.html#msg39382, but this page is also a helpful guide.

Moscow's subway system is one of the most efficient and beautiful in the world. Stations in the center have enormous ceilings with opulent mosaics, chandeliers and statues. For most of the day trains run flawlessly every minute and a half or less.


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Not only is the Moscow Metro the easiest way to get around the city, it is also famous in its own right.  Begun in 1931, architects immortalised great Soviet achievements with exceptional art and design are Mayakovskaya, Novoslobskaya, Kievskaya and Dobrinskaya. Cost per ride is 19Rbl, operating hours are from 05:30 until 01:00.

Purchase a plastic-coated card and buy a specified number of trips, pass through the barriers by swiping the card. When you are on the train, the loudspeakers announce the name of the station you are arriving into, then as the doors close, they they announce the next station.


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Where to buy a ticket and how:  The Moscow Metro uses magnetic cards (contact cards) for tickets with a fixed number of journeys (up to 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 60 and 70 journeys for 30 days from the day of the first journey). Currently (Jan, 2008) the cost of 1 ride is 19 roubles (78 US cents), starting with 5 ride cards there are small discounts.  As long as you stay inside the Metro you may transfer to as many trains as necessary but once you leave the Metro then your card must be re-entered.

Magnetic cards were introduced in 1993 as a test and were used as unlimited tickets between 1996 and 1998. The sale of magnetic cards stopped in 2008. In January 2007, Moscow Metropolitan began replacing magnetic cards with fixed number of journeys by contactless cards. Since January 20, 2007 contactless cards are available for 10, 20 and 60 journeys versions. Smartcards are being used in Moscow Metro since 1998 and are called Transport Cards. Transport Cards are available as 'unlimited' and 'social' tickets. The unlimited card can be programmed for 30, 90, and 365 days.


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In the center, no place is more than a 10-minute walk from a metro station, and stations are well distributed throughout the suburbs. Even if you plan on getting around by car while you're in Moscow, it's worth taking a ride on the metro just to gawk at the underground palaces.

Most lines run radially through the city, except the Koltsevaya Line (number 5), which is a 20-km-long ring connecting all the radial lines and a few smaller lines outside. On all lines, travellers can determine the direction of the train by the gender of the announcer: on the ring line, a male voice indicates clockwise travel, and a female voice counter-clockwise. On the radial lines, travellers heading toward the centre of Moscow will hear male-voiced announcements, and travellers heading away will hear female-voiced announcements. In addition, there is an abundance of signs showing all the stations that can be reached in a given direction.

In most cases an unlimited card is good for both buses or the Metro but not in every case so feel free to ask someone.  The open hours are from 5.20 a.m. to 1.00 a.m. Usually the last train starts its way at 00.50 from the last station at any line; the passes between stations are closed at 1.00 am. When there're rush hours (8.00-9.00, 17.00-19.00) the metro is overcrowded, so it's better to avoid it.  Trains typically run in 2 to 4 minute cycles so if you missed one, don't worry the next one will arrive before you know it.


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Tips for a good Metro experience
Learn some of the Cyrillic alphabet and language before you leave for Moscow. Although this isn't a definite requirement to learn how to navigate the Moscow metro, it will certainly be a help.  Signs inside the Metro stations are generally only in Cyrillic.

Buy a ticket which is good for several days.  At older turnstiles feed the ticket into the entry gate. The ticket should be arrow side down when you put it into the slot. You put it in and pull it out and a green light should come on until you pass through.

Print a map (see below) to take with you so that you can navigate the various levels inside each station with the overhead signs to find the correct Moscow metro line. Once you find the one you want, take the escalator down to the metro lines. When you arrive at the bottom, you will need to check the overhead signs again to find out which side of the platform you need to be on for your train.

Transfer to other lines. If you need to connect to other lines, you should follow the overhead signs. Everything is clearly marked and should be easy to find if you have your map and have written down the train names in advance in Russian Cyrillic.

Having successfully navigated the exceptionally fast escalator (stop admiring the decor - this is serious) get ready to contend with the choice between the left or right side of the open platform, aided only by the Cyrillic-inscribed signs hanging from the ceiling or the walls. There are no full-scale maps down here, so if you have problems with the Cyrillic alphabet or you don't know the network, well, it is important to carry your own map and/or have a clear mental photograph of your destination name and any changes you need to make on the way. 



Plan your trip
Here is an interactive Metro map on which you can calculate times between stations, route a trip, or just find interesting facts about a station by clicking on the station name: http://engl.mosmetro.ru/flash/scheme01.html  Download it because it's in both English/Russian and take with you on your trip.




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Metro words and phrases:
entrance
 вход
 [fhot]
 
exit
 выход
 [vi-hat]
 
trains to the stations
 к поездам до станций
 [k pa-yiz-dám da stán-zeey]
 
passage to the station
 переход на станцию
 [pye-ree-hót na stán-tsee-yoo]
 
Where is...
 Где ...
 [gdye ]
 
...the next metro station?
 ...ближайшая станция метро?
 [blee-zháy-shaya stán-tsee-ya mee-tró]
 
...exit (to the city)?
 ...выход в город?
 [ví-hat v gó-rat]
 
Where can I change to line...?
 Где переход на линию ...?
 [gdye pye-ree-hót na lée-nee-yoo ]
 
Where can I buy metro tickets?
 Где продаются? билеты на метро?
 [gdye pra-da-yóo-tsa bee-lyé-ti na mee-tró]
 
Where shall I change?
 Где мне надо сделать пересадку?
 [gdye mnye ná-do sdyé-lat pye-ree-sát-koo]
 
Does this train go to station...?
 Этот поезд идёт до станции ...?
 [ét-at pó-yeezd ee-dyót da stan-tsee-ee]
 

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2009, 08:39:05 AM »
Victory Park


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RUA member McMann has posted some impressive Victory Park photos here: http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php/topic,5773.msg78849.html#msg78849


Victory Park was only completed in the mid-nineties, and is something of a last gasp for the Soviet tradition of monumental triumphal art. Located on and around the Poklonnaya Gora - the hill where Napoleon waited in vain to be given the keys to the city when his troops were surrounding Moscow in 1812 - the park is set in an area steeped in Russian military history.

On 9 May, Victory Day in Russia, the park becomes the center of Moscow's celebrations, and as many of the remaining veterans and survivors as can make there way here, along with scores of the younger generations. In Russia the emphasis is on celebration rather than remembrance, and this is one of the most popular public holidays.


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The central avenue is called "Years of War": It has five terraces, symbolizing the five years of conflict, and there are 1,418 fountains - one for every day. At night the fountains turn gushing water red as the Russian soul-blood, as illuminated at night, graphically demonstrating the human depth of the carnage and bravery of the Russian people during that horrifying and decimating episode in their history.


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The park includes a memorial chapel, mosque, and synagogue to the circular Victors' Place, which has a triangular obelisk soaring 150 meters and surmounted by a statue of Nike, the Goddess of Victory. Behind this lies the crescent-shaped Museum of the Great Patriotic War, which gives a detailed but staid overview of Russia's appalling loses and eventual victory.


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The Central Museum of the Great Patriotic War is filled with exhibits which tell about the key battles, the heroic deeds of rank-and-file soldiers and prominent military leaders and officers, the war effort of people in the rear and the joint activities of the Allies that brought to the unconditional surrender of the Nazi Germany in May of 1945.


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After years of silence on the amounts of American equipment, weapons, food and medical supplies, Victory Park acknowledges assistance from the Allies.


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Its easy to find--just ask anyone.  The physical location is Kuznetsovskaya Ulitsa, 25 and the closest Metro is Park Pobedy (which means Victory Park).


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Offline Manny

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2009, 01:11:03 PM »
One of Mendy's pictures above looks to be the Ukraina hotel where I have stayed.

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A rather nice hotel, rooms furnished with antiques. Staff are sullen as you would expect, and the restaurant is highly forgettable and grossly over priced.

You can go up to the top of the central tower and there is a huge balcony type area where you can walk around and get a great view over the river, the Whitehouse and much of Moscow.

Published prices are astronomical and in US Dollars. Huge discounts can be had when booked by Russian speakers or a Russian travel agent in advance.
I apologise.
And so he should.........

Online shakespear

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2009, 02:15:12 PM »
One of Mendy's pictures above looks to be the Ukraina hotel where I have stayed.   

Are you sure it's still there?  I thought it was one of the many soviet-style hotels to hit the wrecking ball in the past 3 years with plans to be replaced by a new, modern, huge western style high cost hotels. 

I could well be wrong. 
"If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun" - Katharine Hepburn

Offline Manny

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2009, 02:25:48 PM »
It was about 3/4 years ago when I was there - the website suggests it is still there: http://www.hotelukraina.ru/eng/comm.html

The hotel rooms look pretty much as I remember ours was.
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Online shakespear

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2009, 02:32:00 PM »
After years of silence on the amounts of American equipment, weapons, food and medical supplies, Victory Park acknowledges assistance from the Allies. 

I thought this rather funny.  In the museum proper there is some mention of Lend-Lease activities and even displays of old cans of Spam and the like; but virtually no mention of the war in the Pacific or on the western front in France, Italy or North Africa by the other Allies.  At the very end of the walking tour there are several large boxes approximately 1m wide, 1m deep and 2m tall.  The front of the box is covered in glass making it a display.  Inside these boxes there are male dummies dressed from helmet to boots in the normal issue battledress of the US Army, British Army, and French Army.  The display contains the standard rifle issued the troops (US M-1, British Enfield etc) along with other items of personal issue gear and other things that a soldier from that country might carry on his person while fighting. 

When my wife translated the captions, I had to chuckle.  It was something like, "Oh yes America fought in the war too and a brief description of our 'limited participation in the war' and items contained in the display".  With all due respect to the HUGE sacrifice made by the Russian people in stopping Hitler, it was a bit offensive.  Oh well, the winner gets to write the history.

The tower of the museum is within eyesight of the Moscow Golf Club.           


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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Moscow - Москва́ - Moskva
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2009, 02:45:10 PM »
Its still standing.  It was the old Hotel Rossiya torn down last year to make way for an even more massive new hotel, office and shopping complex.

The Ukraine will probably never be torn down as it is one of "Stalin's seven sisters" built on his orders and by his design.  He returned from a visit with Mr Roosevelt and was chagained to learn that Moscow had no tall buildings to compete with the West.  The "Sisters" of which Hotel Ukraina is one (it's a hotel on some floors, offices on others, and there are lots of private apartments in that building also) were his answer to that.

Stalin made the Warsaw Palace of Culture in Poland and the Riga Academy of Sciences in Latvia buildings to closely resemble the Moscow seven sisters.

It seems that his "design" was really a copy of two buildings, the Manhattan Municipal building and the Liver complex in Liverpool, both of which predate the Moscow sisters and look very, very, very much the same.   :chuckle:

Muscovites seldom use the name "Seven Sisters" and call these buildings "Vysotki" or Stalinskie Vysotki (Сталинские высотки) which means "(Stalin's) Tall buildings."


The Rossiya was a landmark complex and the city government took a whole lot of heat for tearing it down, however it was Soviet built and needed to be demolished at some point.  The new complex will also include a historical park.


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To the right of the Kremlin, the Rossiya used to tower above the Kremlin walls.  Torn down, the new design will assure that the new office and hotel towers leave space as not to "crowd" the Kremlin.

To give an idea of how large it was, it was 21 floors tall,  had 3,200 rooms, 245 half suites, a post office, a health club, a nightclub, a movie theater and a barber shop as well as the 2500-seat State Central Concert Hall.