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Author Topic: Ukrainian culture  (Read 35581 times)

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Offline JayH

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #50 on: July 09, 2012, 10:02:09 PM »
Love all your work-- but Post #48 takes the cake !! Very funny-- well-- sort of funny!

Offline Halo

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #51 on: November 12, 2012, 02:17:28 AM »
Quote
in the way of saying "in Ukraine" following the country's independence. Traditional usage is na Ukrajini (with the preposition na, "on"), but recently Ukrainian authorities have begun using v Ukrajini (with the preposition v, "in", which is also used with most other country names).

I always heard "v Ukraini" among the diaspora and it is common in literature.  "Na Ukraini" is a "Sovietization".

Gogol used "v"

Порядку нет в Украйне: полковники и есаулы грызутся, как собаки, между собою

as did Ukraine's most famous literary figure, Taras Shevchenko -

І мертвим, і живим,
і ненарожденним землякам моїм
в Украйні і не в Украйні
моє дружнєє посланіє

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #52 on: March 22, 2014, 01:06:42 PM »
Halo, I think you are correct.

It is easy to assume that Russian grammar rules can be easily transferred other Cyrillic based languages and as you point out that is not always correct.


Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #53 on: March 22, 2014, 01:15:30 PM »
Many of us are familiar with the "What's On" magazines found in tourist locations like hotel rooms in major cities around the world. Count one casualty of the Maidan events as the Kyiv magazine is shutting down, at least temporarily. We hope that PAN publishing will have the opportunity to regroup and survive but given the realities of adverting in that environment we suspect as mentioned in the attached letter that the group may have to consider the sale of franchise rights at some point. We hope for the best and for their future in serving Kyiv.

Here is a statement from the management group:



Dear readers, advertisers, partners, and friends,

These last few months have been extremely difficult on many levels. Throughout this, we at What’s On have done our best to keep people informed and analyse what has been happening while at the same time deliver for you, every week, what is the Kyiv community’s magazine. However, one way in which things have been extremely difficult of late is in the business environment, and this is a reality no one can ignore.

Over the last few months, as things have worsened, so have our revenues due to losses in advertising. It is for this reason we have to announce that this issue of What’s On is going to be the last, for what we hope is a short while. We want to stress, we are not closing. We have always firmly believed in What’s On’s importance to the community, and after a brief pause we intend to bring What’s On back to continue being the publication that the people of Kyiv have loved reading for 16 years.

During this pause we will be communicating with you all, to find out what kind of What’s On you want to see when we return. What have we done wrong? What have we done right? Why is What’s On important to you? Please let us know by e-mail (write to feedback@panpublishing.com) – we promise to read and consider every one of your comments and take them on board as we plan to come back. Importantly, we will be communicating with those who in fact pay for the magazine, the advertisers, to find out what they want and need from us too.

PAN Publishing has owned What’s On for the last five and a half years, and it truly has been an honour and a pleasure. We look forward to when we can bring your magazine back to you. That said, should someone else decide that they would like to purchase the title from us, take it forward in their own direction, and have the pleasure of owning this title, we are prepared to listen to sensible offers. You can use the same e-mail address to contact us on this question.

It’s time for a new direction, whether that’s with What’s On under our ownership or otherwise. It’s time for a new direction for Ukraine. We see great things ahead now, a brief pause to take stock of our surroundings is necessary, to analyse our situation, to see what people want, and to act on that, delivering something even better for What’s On, for Ukraine, for everyone.

Slava. Slava. Slava.

Paul, Neil and Lana

Offline Net_Lenka

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #54 on: March 22, 2014, 02:58:55 PM »
I am not too big specialist in Ukraina language but is not the Ukraina would be(was)  "Вкраїні" which makes just impossible to use "V" ( instead of "na") in combination with  "Vkraini"

So here is  Shevchenko

Як умру, то поховайте
Мене на могилі
Серед степу широкого
На Вкраїні милій,
--------------------------------

folk stuff i guess

Бо я родилась на Вкраїні,
Де сонце золоте.
Бо я родилась на Вкраїні,
Де небо голубе.

==============

here is too old songs to be "sovietized"

Було колись — на Вкраїні
Ревіли гармати;
Було колись — запорожці
 Вміли пановати.

================
На Вкраїні сурми грають,
Нас до бою закликають.
Встань, Тарасе, встань, Богдане,
Повставайте, всі гетьмани.
- А Вы кто такой будете?
-Тьфу на Вас
-А фамилия Ваша как?  -Тьфу на Вас еще раз .. а фамилия моя слишком известная, чтобы я её называл

Offline Halo

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #55 on: March 22, 2014, 04:34:51 PM »
"на Вкраїні" in this sense means in "the country", not "in Ukraine".  "na Ukraini" is, and always has been, a colloquialism.

"v Ukraini" means "in Ukraine", and always has.  But, the better half says the change mendy referred to came about because of criminal slang.

Offline GuppyCaptain

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #56 on: March 22, 2014, 07:29:36 PM »
 What a great post. Spasibo. I can totally relate to the pig fat thing. It's kind of a big deal in the Hungarian and Romanian culture as well. Mmmmmm. Delicious. However, I'm surprised to read that Russians apparently look down on Ukrainians for eating it.

My Russian friend goes gaga over salo. We had a nice hike this winter and cooked it over an open fire. It was  :thumbsup:

Online Millaa

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #57 on: March 22, 2014, 08:12:46 PM »
Как говорила по-русски "На Украине", так и буду  ;D. Кстати, Шевченко тоже русскую орфографию соблюдал и писал с ятями, потом этого классика украинской литературы кому-то сильно украинизировать пришлось.
Скептический ум - страшное оружие с собственным счастьем

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #58 on: March 22, 2014, 08:23:56 PM »
I respect "the Russia's" right not to be called Mother Ukraine's borderland. Of course I also respect "the Leningrad's" right not be to considered as southern Sweden. Frankly, even though "the Russia" is a nice little suburb of Lithuania and Poland, people should give "the Russia " more respect.


Offline Net_Lenka

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #59 on: March 22, 2014, 09:29:39 PM »
"на Вкраїні" in this sense means in "the country", not "in Ukraine".  "na Ukraini" is, and always has been, a colloquialism.

"v Ukraini" means "in Ukraine", and always has.  But, the better half says the change mendy referred to came about because of criminal slang.
Ah I got - it was because it was always just "country" not the state
- А Вы кто такой будете?
-Тьфу на Вас
-А фамилия Ваша как?  -Тьфу на Вас еще раз .. а фамилия моя слишком известная, чтобы я её называл

Offline Halo

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2014, 11:06:28 PM »
Как говорила по-русски "На Украине", так и буду  ;D.

I'm not advocating one use or another.  Languages are fluid, and change over time.

Quote
Кстати, Шевченко тоже русскую орфографию соблюдал и писал с ятями, потом этого классика украинской литературы кому-то сильно украинизировать пришлось.

Shevchenko wrote poetry using Latin script, he wrote poetry using Cyrillic script, he wrote poetry in Russian, as most of the artists in his circle were Russians, and he wrote poetry in his Cherkasky dialect.  At that time, there was no standardized Ukrainian alphabet, so his writing, in some sense, was experimental.   In addition to being a great poet, it is his works, in particular, that created Ukrainian literature (note - it existed before, but it moved leaps and bounds because of Shevchenko).

Late in his life, Shevchenko became enamoured with a decades younger peasant girl.  It did not have a happy ending.

Offline DanielLee5

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Re: Ukrainian culture
« Reply #61 on: July 01, 2017, 11:45:39 PM »
So many stunning pics here, I feel so nostalgic
Thanks, guys