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Author Topic: Russian culture  (Read 32655 times)

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Offline mirror

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2008, 01:39:59 AM »
Quote
   Yekaterinburg's "Church on the Blood", built on the spot where the Ipatiev House once stood.


I visited this church when I was in Yekaterinburg this winter. But I could not visit a shaft in  wood of outside of Yekaterinburg where Romanov's bones were found.

Romanov's family was killed in Ipatiev house and then their bodies were transported and thrown away in a shaft.



Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2008, 11:21:11 PM »
The history of thе Moscow Kremlin goes back to the earliest days of Russia. The first written record of Moscow dates back to 1147, to the reign of Great PrinceYuri of Kiev, Vladimir Monomakh's son.  Yuri Dolgoruky is considered to be the founder of Moscow and in commemoration of this an equestrian statue by the sculptor S.V. Orlov was erected in Tverskaya Street in 1954.

One of the most remarkable exhibits of the Kremlin museums linked to the genealogy of Russian princes is the Cap of Monomakh, the Russian Tsars' inherited crown. It even became proverbial. There is a saying: "How heavy you are, the Cap of Monomakh!" meaning the heavy burden of responsibility.

Since time immemorial the Moscow Kremlin has been the centre of Russian statehood, the residence of Russian tsars and hierarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church.


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The Kremlin has been the residence of the President of the Russian Federation and his Administration since 1992.

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It was only in 1955 that the Moscow Kremlin's (KREM-eL) unique museums have again become accessible to everyone. Church services have recently been resumed in the old cathedrals and the Kremlin bells which have been silent for over 70 years have come to life.


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Video Presentation:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InR8r6mKsy4

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #32 on: May 08, 2008, 11:59:39 PM »
Czar Bell: At the foot of the Ivan the Great Bell Tower, rests a monument to the grand days of the Romanov Dynasty. The Czar's Bell. It was Czarina Anna I, who commissioned the bell in 1734, a fulfillment of the dream of her grandfather, Czar Alexei. The huge bronze bell was to be the biggest and clearest sounding bell in the world. Unfortunately, before the bell was raised, it cracked in a fire in 1737. Two hundred tons of silence are all that remain.

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The Kremlin is very beautiful at night!

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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #33 on: May 09, 2008, 12:52:08 AM »
да́ча, or as we say in English, 'dacha.'  This is the Russian summer home or cottage and the envy of any family not fortunate enough to have one.  Many Russian families, of all econcomic backgrounds, do have a dacha. 

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Many urban Russians own a second home in the outlying country areas.  In the Soviet period, many of these summer homes were relatively spartan with no heating, etc.  Some however, are on an acre or two of land and can be used as year-a-round homes. 

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]    Shown here is the restored dacha of the late Russian writter Pasternak.

With the new economic boom in Moscow, the "New Russians" are building huge, sprawling compounds (often many acres in size) that costs millions of U.S. dollars to construct. 

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Many of the New Russians live in these home year around, commuting into the city.  This includes many of the country's politicians, as well as members of the Russian mafia.  Their homes are guarded by heavily armed guards, and caravans of black SUVs and BMW's form motorcades that take these people into the city center during the week, causing the already nightmarish Moscow traffic to grind to a halt.   

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Because most people live in big, overcrowded cities, they keep small plots of land, called dachas, on the outskirts of the cities. There they keep lovely gardens where they grow fruit and vegetables as well as flowers. They usually have some kind of shelter on the land as well. This can be anything from a little shed to a huge, comfortable house.

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]   Old school house not far from the Mendeleyev family dacha.

Most dachas are somewhere in between, a small cottage suitable for one or two people to spend a night. The dacha is a relaxing and very important place, and spending time at a dacha can help you understand the Russian people.

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]    This one has electricity, a rarity in many older dachas.

It is where most Russians believe they can find peace and beauty.  As you can see from the spread on the table, they usually eat very well in the summer!

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]   Friends dacha, and like most Russians, the dacha vegetable garden is very important.

Dachas come in every size, shape and can be found from the very basic with no indoor plumbing to the ornate summer mansion.

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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #34 on: May 09, 2008, 01:31:42 AM »
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The first dachas in Russia began to appear during the reign of Peter the Great. Initially they were small estates in the country, which were given to loyal vassals by the Tsar. In archaic Russian, the word dacha means something given and is a cognate with Latin data.

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Anyone who occupies a dacha for the time being is called dachnik (дачник).

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One favourite activity is to go fishing, and swimming, in a nearby river or lake.

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Offline Jared2151

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #35 on: May 09, 2008, 07:17:15 AM »
Mendeleyev,

   You never cease to amaze me with your educational / informative posts, keep up the excellent work.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2008, 10:04:46 AM »
Thanks Jared!  I'm glad it can be of service and enjoyment!

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #37 on: May 21, 2008, 12:52:59 AM »
St Petersburg: Amber Room:


One of the Summer Palace attractions in St Petersburg is the famous Amber room.


[ Guests cannot view attachments ]   (The original Amber Room)


The original Amber Room (Янтарная комната, German: Bernsteinzimmer) in the Catherine Palace of Tsarskoye Selo near Saint Petersburg was a complete chamber decoration of amber panels backed with gold leaf and mirrors. Due to its singular beauty, it was sometimes dubbed the "Eighth Wonder of the World".

The Amber Room was created from 1701 to 1709 in Prussia and remained at Charlottenburg Palace until 1716 when it was given by Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm I to his then ally, Tsar Peter the Great of the Russian Empire. The Amber Room was looted during World War II by Nazi Germany and brought to Königsberg. Knowledge of its whereabouts was lost in the chaos at the end of the war.

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A reconstructed Amber Room was inaugurated in 2003 in the Catherine Palace in Saint Petersburg, Russia.  The latest discovery, as reported in February 2008, is of a 20-metre pit in Deutschneudorf, a small town near the German-Czech border. The site reportedly matches intelligence from survivors who helped loot the fabled room, and initial probe reports are said to indicate the presence of a large quantity of gold or silver.

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On 20th Feb 2008, German treasure hunters claimed to have found the Amber room.  The discovery of an estimated two tons of gold or silver was made in a cavern 20 meters underground near the village of Deutschneudorf on Germany's border with the Czech Republic.  The mystery of the Amber Room has been the basis for the plot of several films, books and art exhibitions. 



Links:
-Follow this web link for more on the modern day hunt to find out what happened to the original Amber Room:
http://www.amberroom.org/index-english.htm

-History of the Amber Room:  http://www.geo.uw.edu.pl/HOBBY/AMBER/amberroom.htm

Offline Chris

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #38 on: May 21, 2008, 02:05:58 AM »
Fantastic Jim, I don't know how you come up with all this great information and wonderful pictures.

Chris

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #39 on: July 21, 2008, 06:32:38 AM »
Question about russian / ukraine culture :

Someone special told me, that her babushka prepared a whole day for my visit and it was part of russian folklore.
There was also an abundance of food and the amount left over was sickening.

I have no idea what to google for or what the significance of this is.

Does anyone know ?
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Offline lindochka

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #40 on: July 21, 2008, 08:51:01 AM »
Question about russian / ukraine culture :

Someone special told me, that her babushka prepared a whole day for my visit and it was part of russian folklore.
There was also an abundance of food and the amount left over was sickening.

I have no idea what to google for or what the significance of this is.

Does anyone know ?


Markje, I started to respond in more detail, but I gave up because my reply was starting to seem like some sort of lecture on cultural anthropology. I don't know enough about Dutch culture to be certain, but I suspect you had a Close Encounter with Cultural Differences!

Perhaps "someone special" meant that such preparations are part of Russian culture/tradition? That's certainly true. Guests are a very big deal and all the stops are pulled out. During my first visit to meet my family back in 2000 I was so amazed at the spread of food at my welcome dinner -- not just the quantity, but the variety and the artistry of the presentation -- that I photographed the table. I knew my visit was a big deal to my cousins (as it was to me), but Eastern European friends back in the US commented admiringly on this evidence of how my visit was regarded.

Of course there was an abundance of food at Babushka's -- guests are a gift from God! Nothing is too good for them, everything must be the best one can offer, and in large quantity. I can understand how what you saw might have seemed excessive to you, but it was evidence of the regard for you and the importance of your visit.

I would also imagine that nothing went to waste. DM and I indulged our wedding guests in a manner considered fairly lavish in DM's hometown. We served buffet-style and I promise you that I made so much food and so many different dishes that there was literally no room on the buffet table for our cake. (I had to set it on the window sill behind the table until it was time for dessert.)

We ourselves enjoyed party food for the better part of the week that followed our Big Day and we threw away nothing!

The way in which Babushka entertained you is evidence of the importance of you and your visit to her and her family. No matter how good a cook she is, I doubt she goes to that kind of trouble on a daily basis. It is also evidence of Babushka's skills in the Russian art of being mistress of a household. Keeping in mind the traditionally very close relationship between women and their grandchildren in that part of the world (which long predates the beginnings of the USSR), it would be reasonable to conclude that "someone special" has had a fine example set for her.

IMO, you have much about which you should be pleased, not to mention deeply honored. Personally I'm delighted for you!

HTH.
Life is so short we must move very slowly.

Offline Olga_Mouse

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #41 on: July 21, 2008, 11:35:00 AM »

I have no idea what to google for or what the significance of this is.

Does anyone know ?


Ever seen the movie "My big Greek wedding" - with American parents bringing "a cake with a hole" to the "small" party arranged by Greek parents?  :chuckle:
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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #42 on: July 22, 2008, 01:35:45 AM »

IMO, you have much about which you should be pleased, not to mention deeply honored. Personally I'm delighted for you!

HTH.

hi Linda,

Thanks a bunch for the long reply :) I felt very honoured, thats for sure. :) :) I only regretted not speaking more Russian as Lena was too busy and happy chatting with her family to do translations for me :)

Mark
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Offline froid

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #43 on: July 30, 2008, 06:45:33 AM »
I saw the padlock thing in Moscow as well.  On one bridge they poles running down the middle of it that had space for putting locks on.  People would put locks near the top of the poles and keep adding and adding onto the other locks until it looked like it had "trees" of locks running down the middle of it.  Very interesting to see.
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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Russian culture
« Reply #44 on: October 05, 2008, 09:23:34 PM »
Sheremetyevo the airport, Sheremetiev the family:



You've flown into Moscow and your ticket said SVO-2.  That funny looking name Sheremetyevo, Шереметьево, just looked weird on the terminal from out on the tarmac. And when the captain came on the speaker to welcome you to Moscow did he say "SHITTY mate-vi-ah" or was that "SHADDY met-ye-vah?"  Dang, you wish he'd say it again, cause you're not sure if you heard it right.

Then as the plane taxied closer you could see the signs.  Heck, how do they speak such a language? 

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Unless Moscow is where you depart you're likely off to either Шереметьево-1, which although it's susposedly the first terminal of one airport and shares runways with terminal 2, it might as well be on the other side of the world.  And it will take you that long to get there too.  Or, if this is just an short layover, you may be headed off to another Moscow airport.  There are several and in fact 3 of them are international airports. The other 2 international facilities are DME - Domodedovo (аэропорт Домодедово) and VNU - Vnukovo (аэропорт Внуково).

This morning the church choir, of which it has been reported that I make feeble attempts to sing bass, sang an Orthodox anthem by Sheremeteiv, the composer.  Standing there in the choir loft when my thoughts should have been centered on more heavenly realms, I was preoccupied with thoughts of the good (but very inexpensive) meals served in the airport employee cafeteria upstairs in terminal 2.

You might be interested to know that at one time the Sheremetev family was the largest landowner (excepting the Tsars) in all of Russia.  Count Boris Sheremetev was a general in the Russian army who helped Peter the Great build Russia into a full European power.  In addition to his duties as a general, he also helped Peter build the Russian Navy.

Count Alexander Dmitrievitch Sheremetiev, whose name is transliterated a variety of ways was born in 1859 and was the last fully noble Russian Count of the Sheremetiev bloodline. Sheremetiev was a direct descendant of Boris Sheremetev, who fought alongside Peter the Great in the Great Northern War, and Sheremetiev's father served as chamberlain to Tsar Alexander II.

On the occasion of his marriage in 1883, Sheremetiev purchased a building located at No. 4 Kutuzova Embankment in St. Petersburg. Sheremetiev was a Major General to the Tsar in peacetime and used his position and privilege to mount the first firefighting companies in Russia. It was the Sheremetiev family that at one point owned the famous Moscow palace and grounds known as the Ostankino Park.


[ Guests cannot view attachments ] Sheremetiev Palace park, a St Petersburg landmark.

Alexandr Sheremetiev was also a very talented composer and choral director, who served as the leader of the chorus attached to the Russian Court. He ultimately formed his own private orchestra and chorus, which played public concerts at his estate in St. Petersburg; the quality of the orchestra is said to have been superior to that belonging to the Conservatory of St. Petersburg itself, although many of its musicians played in both orchestras. Tickets to concerts at Sheremetiev's palace were kept at low cost, and Sheremetiev viewed his musical activities as a kind of public service, donating the proceeds from concerts to churches and folk music groups. After decades of operation, Sheremetiev's music-making came to an abrupt end in 1917 when the Russian Revolution forced him and his family to flee to Paris. He died in 1931.

Very little of Sheremetiev's music is accounted for, but it is of such high quality that the little of it that has survived suggests the technical refinement of a composer who wrote music often and well. His chorus "Rejoice Now Heavenly Powers" is a standard piece among Russian Orthodox choirs, and a recording of the work by Chorovaya Akademia became a low-level public radio "hit" when included on the popular BMG compilation Ancient Voices in 1995. After his departure from Russia, his estate housed various political operations belonging to the Soviet state until 1932 when it was established as the headquarters of the Leningrad Writer's Union. Fire broke out in the palace in 1993 and it became the subject of an international restoration effort, the baseline work being completed over the next decade.


[ Guests cannot view attachments ] Sheremetiev Palace park.


One of Sheremetiev's descendants, Pierre Cheremetieff, serves as head of the Russian Rachmaninoff Conservatory in Paris, and it was he who opened the door to the gallery of Sheremetiev Palace in 2003 for the first public concert held there in more than 85 years.


The music of Sheremetiev lives on.  Listen to this contemporary rendition set to the background of an all-male Sheremetiev chorus. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn8N2OIqenQ



PS....when saying Шереметьево, although this can be a tongue-twister at first, here are a couple of hints:
1) The letter "e" is a soft vowel and so it softens those hard consonants to the left.
2) The letter "e" is "yeh" (not e) and if you'll allow the "ye" to come out and play you will find it easier to say this word.

If you've struggled with this word then "Shay-tye-may-tyeva" is probably closer to sounding more like a natural Russian.



Finally, (Gasp!) the Sheremetiev family were not "ethnic Russians!"  OH NO!  They were descendants of the Tatars, again proving the phrase, "scratch and Russian and underneath is a Tatar."