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Author Topic: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.  (Read 39698 times)

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Offline WestCoast

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #30 on: April 11, 2009, 12:02:14 AM »
Westcoast

You are a little behind the times. The federal, provincial, and territorial governments have committed for full mobility for the full labour force within Canada and the date for completion was April 1 2009.

In another words the barriers that once were, even between provinces are being, or have been changed. 

The next step is still in the works, for outside workers to be intergrated, between us and the EU, with a minimum of hassle.     :)


Fireeater, I know that it is far easier for a professional to move between provinces/territories in Canada (and it only took till 2009, wow) then for a foreign professional to gain accreditation in Canada.  :laugh:
Ipsa scientia potestas est. Knowledge itself is power.   Sir Francis Bacon

Offline WestCoast

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #31 on: April 11, 2009, 12:18:58 AM »

  And it's too bad CIC never tells those high skilled people that their profession in their country mean nothing here in Canada. Yet they are led to believe that they can easily get their papers to continue on working as a doctor for instance.  CIC tells them they need doctors but fails them the entire way,leaving them with shattered dreams and working a menial job.  :-[

Donny's right (bet you don't hear that too often  :laugh:), when doctors from the UK and the US have troubles being licensed to practice medicine in Canada, the chances for a doctor from the FSU being licensed to practice medicine in Canada are virtually nil.

As I am in my immigration process now, I visit the FSU immigration fora that target Canada, and can talk to people. There are doctors and other medical professionals who immigrated as skilled migrants from the FSU and got licensed in Canada. I think the thing is only in time and efforts that one is willing to spend in order to stay in the profession.


Belle there's actually groups of foreign born and trained physicians in Canada that are lobbying for changes to Canadian law to make it easier to gain licensing under provincial regulations.  As I've mentioned before there are numerous medical professionals from eastern Europe and Asia who have tried in vain to be accepted for licensing as medical professionals in BC.  There is hope, however, if you have money or connections, you can get licensed. 

Over the last ten years of my volunteering I've met three people from eastern Europe who have been licensed as doctors in BC.  Two women and one man, one man and one woman were from Russia and the other woman was from Yugoslavia.  The man came to Canada as a specialist with impressive credentials and numerous publications to his credit.  He also had a number of local connections and was sponsored by a several local medical professionals.  The Russian woman came in as the wife of a local man who had spent a considerable amount of time in Russia and is quite wealthy.   The woman from Yugoslavia came to Canada in her late 20's and was content to work as something other than a doctor until she won a minor slots jackpot in Las Vegas several years after arriving.  She quit her job and started the process and managed to get a spot in the medical program at university.  Last I heard she was in specialist training and doing well.
Ipsa scientia potestas est. Knowledge itself is power.   Sir Francis Bacon

Offline fireeater

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #32 on: April 11, 2009, 06:08:00 AM »
Westcoast

You are a little behind the times. The federal, provincial, and territorial governments have committed for full mobility for the full labour force within Canada and the date for completion was April 1 2009.

In another words the barriers that once were, even between provinces are being, or have been changed. 

The next step is still in the works, for outside workers to be intergrated, between us and the EU, with a minimum of hassle.     :)


Fireeater, I know that it is far easier for a professional to move between provinces/territories in Canada (and it only took till 2009, wow) then for a foreign professional to gain accreditation in Canada.  :laugh:

Actually you had said it was not easy, for a doctor to go from one province to another, due to the different organizations in each that look after these. ;D

The new commitment with the provinces, is part of the EU treaty. Those organizations that govern them, are also part of the talks. The EU is has already done the same thing, if their members wish to be part of this, and get the benefits. One of the items I read was dealing with all levels of health professionals, being able to move between the countries that are part of the EU. In order to make this work, steps have to be taken to get to that spot. Movement of labour is part of these talks, it goes far beyond trade agreements that exist with any others. 

Besides don't you think it is about time, with today world, that with a minimum of hassle one could actually do this.  ;D 



Offline Olga_Mouse

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #33 on: April 11, 2009, 06:25:50 AM »

As I am in my immigration process now, I visit the FSU immigration fora that target Canada, and can talk to people.


So there is more than one forum dedicated to that particular topic?

I though forum = sg, while fora = pl. - or have I forgotten all my Latin completely?  ???
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Offline BelleZeBoob

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2009, 09:14:02 AM »
Olga, I am active on two fora dedicated to skilled migration to Canada. Both are Ukrainian hosted, however most members use Russian language and there is a number of Russian members active on them.

Another forum is Russian ( by the forum's nationality, I mean its domain like .ua or .ru) but there is soo many flood, unprecedented negative postings and outright evil posters that I left the forum without making a single post :(

I know the other one but just reading it from time to time. There is some useful and interesting info on them, but it is not that populated and live as the two former fora.

Besides, I read a few blogs of immigrants to Canada.
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Offline BelleZeBoob

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2009, 09:45:49 AM »
 
Here a Russian emigree woman tells about her Russian husband who received his Pilot Certificate after their immigration to Canada. This Certificate allows him to pilot any sky vehicle in Canada. It costed him about 5000 CAD and five months of studying hard.
The Certificate was issued exactly after they both spent five months in Canada.
 
 http://vikitravel.ca/2008/04/04/25-avgusta-2004-god-poluchenie-pilotskogo-svidetelstva/

Just an illustration of how a determined foreigner can establish himself in Canada.
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Offline BelleZeBoob

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2009, 10:09:28 AM »
[ Belle there's actually groups of foreign born and trained physicians in Canada that are lobbying for changes to Canadian law to make it easier to gain licensing under provincial regulations.  As I've mentioned before there are numerous medical professionals from eastern Europe and Asia who have tried in vain to be accepted for licensing as medical professionals in BC.  There is hope, however, if you have money or connections, you can get licensed. 

Over the last ten years of my volunteering I've met three people from eastern Europe who have been licensed as doctors in BC.  Two women and one man, one man and one woman were from Russia and the other woman was from Yugoslavia.  The man came to Canada as a specialist with impressive credentials and numerous publications to his credit.  He also had a number of local connections and was sponsored by a several local medical professionals.  The Russian woman came in as the wife of a local man who had spent a considerable amount of time in Russia and is quite wealthy.   The woman from Yugoslavia came to Canada in her late 20's and was content to work as something other than a doctor until she won a minor slots jackpot in Las Vegas several years after arriving.  She quit her job and started the process and managed to get a spot in the medical program at university.  Last I heard she was in specialist training and doing well.

3 medical doctors in 10 years of volunteering are really not a lot.

On the other hand, I don't privately know any medical professional at all, except those who I visit to monitor my health. :)

But what I do know for sure is that determination and goal orientation are able to make miracles, and even compensate for initial lack of considerable finances. Connections are the assets that can be acquired through networking. Skills and knowledge can be acquired through persistence. Some people are just being not lucky, but anyway, try again!
Men are like Bluetooth: he is connected to you when you are nearby, but searches for other devices when you are away.
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Offline Donhollio

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2009, 10:25:50 AM »

 Canada tends to suck doctors from other countries who meet the standards of canadain trained doctors,is that saying much ?  I don't think so. Did you know that the average time a CDN Dr. spends on upgrading his skills here is 26 minutes a year ? 26 minutes......   :duh:  I guess the magazine a a few articles in it. :duh:
 Not sure what it's like in the states,but I would think it's more than 26 minutes.  P.M. Harper has finally allowed trades people to move within the provinces without losing their apprenticeship hours. before you had to have your 'red seal' with a mark high enough to get your inter-provincial lisence.
 
 So grabbing Doctors from the FSU is possible ,but they have years of extra schooling to do before they will ever hold a valid certification here in Canada.

Offline Rasputin

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2009, 11:59:40 AM »
Belle there's actually groups of foreign born and trained physicians in Canada that are lobbying for changes to Canadian law to make it easier to gain licensing under provincial regulations. 

Good luck with that  :evilgrin0002: The Canadian Medical Association would not welcome a surplus of doctor's flooding the Canadian market IMHO. Maintaining a "shortage" is one of the best ways to ensure continued leverage when negotiating rates paid to doctor's.


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Offline BelleZeBoob

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2009, 12:06:27 PM »
Belle there's actually groups of foreign born and trained physicians in Canada that are lobbying for changes to Canadian law to make it easier to gain licensing under provincial regulations. 

Good luck with that  :evilgrin0002: The Canadian Medical Association would not welcome a surplus of doctor's flooding the Canadian market IMHO. Maintaining a "shortage" is one of the best ways to ensure continued leverage when negotiating rates paid to doctor's.


Agree about maintaining a shortage as a leverage for some advantage.

Nevertheless, the Minister still has some medical professions among those who now can immigrate to Canada as skilled workers.
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Offline fireeater

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2009, 10:16:26 AM »
Since this new on line resource was just introduced on March 20, 2009, by the immigration area, it could be a usefull tool for those who are either bringing a spouse here, or coming on their own.  :) 

Planning to work in Canada? An essential workbook for newcomers will help you gather information about living and working in Canada.

The Working in Canada Tool helps prospective immigrants and newcomers prepare for employment in Canada before departure and after arrival.

The link below

http://www.credentials.gc.ca/



Offline froid

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New rules for CIC coming in January or so...
« Reply #41 on: September 21, 2010, 07:54:30 AM »
Seems like there are some changes in the pipeline for CIC rules regarding Family class applications.  They won't be live until around January but they may make sponsorship more difficult in the future. 

Currently CIC officers have to match two criteria for denying a spousal application.
1. Not a true relationship.
AND
2. Primarily entered into for the purpose of immigration only.

As I read things, the new rules are going to change that AND to an OR.  So if they think either item is an issue in your case they can deny you and you have to go the long and expensive appeal route. 

There are some other changes coming as well in the regulations regarding adoptions and such.  Sort of applying the same logic.  There is much more detail at these sites...

Here is the Gazette posting:

http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2010/2010-04-03/html/reg1-eng.html

The Canadian Immigrant magazine does a good job of explaining in basic terms what this means:

http://www.canadianimmigrant.ca/newsandviews/news/article/6878
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Offline froid

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #42 on: September 21, 2010, 07:58:36 AM »
Oh...and came across this article about Proving your Love for CIC that is very interesting to read and maybe will help people get their thought process straight for that portion of the application.

http://www.canadianimmigrant.ca/settlingincanada/immigrationlaw/article/6701
Look, we're gonna spend half the night driving around the Hills looking for this one party and you're going to say it sucks and we're all gonna leave and then we're gonna go look for this other party. But all the parties and all the bars, they all suck. <-Same goes for forums!

Offline froid

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2010, 07:28:13 AM »
Found some interesting facts and quotes on the CIC website...

Quote
While there are currently no firm numbers on the extent of marriages of convenience, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) knows that, in 2009, overseas offices received about 49,500 applications for permanent residence for partners and spouses. Of these, just under 20 percent were refused. Many of these refusals were due to evidence that the marriage was one of convenience, while others were refused for reasons including criminality, security and medical issues.

Quote
At some overseas missions with a high rate of these marriages, the Department relies more on interviews to identify fraudulent relationships. While interviews use more resources, when necessary, they prove effective to identify and deter fraudulent relationships.
Look, we're gonna spend half the night driving around the Hills looking for this one party and you're going to say it sucks and we're all gonna leave and then we're gonna go look for this other party. But all the parties and all the bars, they all suck. <-Same goes for forums!

Offline froid

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Re: Canadian Immigration and Citzenship, CIC for short.
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2010, 07:29:46 AM »
They are actually consulting with the public regarding some changes coming for Sponsorship.  They asked a few interesting questions...

Quote
In addition to the effects on resources, there are considerations with any potential immigration measure. For instance:

Would conditional status make a spouse more likely to stay in an abusive relationship in order to gain permanent residence?
What if a relationship legitimately breaks down once both parties are in Canada?
What is the appropriate role of government in identifying and protecting people from marriages of convenience?
Should people be responsible for their own decision to sponsor a spouse or partner into Canada?

Any Canadians have answers for these issues? 
Look, we're gonna spend half the night driving around the Hills looking for this one party and you're going to say it sucks and we're all gonna leave and then we're gonna go look for this other party. But all the parties and all the bars, they all suck. <-Same goes for forums!


 

 

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