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Author Topic: Protests in Prague  (Read 229 times)

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Online Lord of the Dance

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Protests in Prague
« on: June 23, 2019, 06:38:19 PM »
Any thoughts on the current protest situation in Prague?

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/23/europe/czech-republic-babis-protest-intl/index.html
"We'll start over again. Grow ourselves new skin. Get a house in Devon. Drink cider from a lemon." ~ Feeder

Online Confederate

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Re: Protests in Prague
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2019, 10:40:20 PM »
Any thoughts on the current protest situation in Prague?

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/23/europe/czech-republic-babis-protest-intl/index.html

If he’s got ties to the old Communist regime as the article suggests then he’s got to go.

No doubt the protesters have relatives who were tortured or murdered by Communists.

Thank God that in Eastern Europe they don’t have any illusions about Communism.
Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P. J. O'Rourke

Online andrewfi

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Re: Protests in Prague
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2019, 08:55:49 AM »
Confederate, try a thought experiment. Let us imagine a world in which the United States had a sudden, complete change of government. No more Republicans and Democrats. The only parties left to take power is now the Green Party and a new party led by Rand Paul.

Fast forward 30 years to a thriving US economy with a secure place in a multipartite world and standards of living somewhat higher for the masses than today. (yes, a stretch, I know!).

How many of the 50 years of age and older politicians and business leaders would NOT at some point in their past have 'connections' to the Republican or Democrat parties?

You know the answer! it is a tiny number.

History lesson time. The Velvet Revolution of 1989 Czechoslovakia made a determined effort to purge the post-revolution establishment of anybody even suspected of having any connections to the previous regime. As a result of this many excellent managers, planners, administrators, economists and politicians were barred from their professional work. The country suffered for it, although it gave a chance to many young and inexperienced (too young, too inexperienced) people.

1989 is 30 years ago and, of course, many of those banned people are retired or deceased. However, in a country with an active economy to expect that today, again, 30 years after the Velvet Revolution, there will be nobody with any connection to an all-encompassing economic, social and political system is just stupid!

The guy has been accused of being some kind of agent, of a type common in the countries of the region at the time. For context, in East Germany, it is estimated that at the fall of the Soviet Union 1 in every 63 citizens were collaborators with the Stasi.

If he has been engaged in corruption then that is a valid reason to call for his removal, but to call for his removal on the basis of an activity (being connected to the previous regime) that was a part of everybody's life at the time makes no sense and smacks of a planned smear. The chances are that if one were to seek the removal of all who could be suspected of having connections to the pre-Velvet Revolution system then most politicians aged 50 or above would lose their position.


...everything ends always well; if it’s still bad, then it’s not the end!


Offline dcguyusa

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Re: Protests in Prague
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2019, 05:58:08 PM »
Quote
If he has been engaged in corruption then that is a valid reason to call for his removal, but to call for his removal on the basis of an activity (being connected to the previous regime) that was a part of everybody's life at the time makes no sense and smacks of a planned smear. The chances are that if one were to seek the removal of all who could be suspected of having connections to the pre-Velvet Revolution system then most politicians aged 50 or above would lose their position.

This reminds me of the recent allegations concerning the Virginia state governor's office.  The so-called "black face" incident and the calls for resignation of the governor, deputy governor (for alleged assault), and attorney general.  They were all asked to step down, by none have done so.   :biggrin:
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Online msmoby

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Re: Protests in Prague
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2019, 02:19:59 AM »
;History' ?




History lesson time. The Velvet Revolution of 1989 Czechoslovakia made a determined effort to purge the post-revolution establishment of anybody even suspected of having any connections to the previous regime. As a result of this many excellent managers, planners, administrators, economists and politicians were barred from their professional work.


Patent poppycock

The Velvet Revolution saw the previous - Coommunist govt - resign en masse for their part in as violent attempt to put down Student protests and Communist Reformers like - Alexander Dubcek - were brought into the new govt ..   


@LoD

The protesters feel some of the leaders plans are undemocratic and feel their leader should resign over multiple corruption accusations