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Author Topic: Roskomnadzor fines Facebook 3000 roubles ($47)  (Read 995 times)

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Online Markje

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Roskomnadzor fines Facebook 3000 roubles ($47)
« on: April 13, 2019, 09:36:58 AM »
Facebook was fined because it did not comply with local data privacy law, see link below for details.

https://news.slashdot.org/story/19/04/12/2051253/russia-fines-facebook-50-for-failing-to-comply-with-local-data-privacy-law
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Re: Roskomnadzor fines Facebook 3000 roubles ($47)
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2019, 10:58:02 AM »
I just read on another site.....Russia fines Facebook and Twitter $50 for refusing to store user data in the country

"Since late 2015 all companies that store or process data about Russian citizens have been required by law to do so in Russia. The issue is that the data must be made available to the Russian government as well. In 2016, LinkedIn was banned in Russia for failure to comply, without being given a chance to negotiate. In February, Apple began storing their data in Russia after they were threatened to a similar fate.

It’s unclear why Roskomnadzor is fining the companies for such miniscule amount. Even if it is the mandatory first step in a longer process, they could have chosen to fine them enough to get their attention. They’ve clearly got a long-term plan, but we’ll have to wait and see if the endgame is a total ban of western social media or the surrender of user data to the Russian government."


For sure FACEBOOK will go bust with such large fines.........Facebook obviously can't afford the huge fine in Russia....   :chuckle:

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Online andrewfi

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Re: Roskomnadzor fines Facebook 3000 roubles ($47)
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2019, 01:11:36 PM »
The tiny fine, the minimum available under the legislation, is not designed to punish Facebook or Twitter. This is an administrative process. The infringement of Twitter and Facebook is now a matter of record putting them on notice to comply with Russian legislation or to face the consequences.

Data sovereignty is an important issue for governments around the world. It might surprise many reading this to learn the EU has similar legislation about the issue and that within the EU, some countries, Germany for one, have even more stringent legislation about where data held about its citizens is stored.

This article deals with how the issue affects the UK in the face of its exit from the EU but indicates the issues and solutions currently in place and how they have needed to be altered in the light of U.S mishandling of data that had previously been thought to be safe. https://www.uk.insight.com/en-gb/learn/articles/2018-05-23-why-brexit-and-gdpr-will-bring-data-sovereignty-to-the-fore

The Russian Federation does not trust foreign corporations to handle the data of its citizens safely. The concerns are particularly in respect of U.S businesses but the agreements between the EU and the U.S mean that the EU can not be considered a safe haven for data on individuals using global data-based businesses.

Here's some background concerning the U.S.

The Russian perspective seems to be not so outrageous and is likely to be what other countries will do as well as trust continues to break down between states.
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