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Author Topic: American Grammar  (Read 580 times)

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Online Guile

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American Grammar
« on: November 16, 2018, 09:57:39 AM »
You know what they say about alimony, It is the screwing you get for the screwing you had.

"for the screwing you GOT.   

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Alimony-The-Screwing-you-get-for-the-Screwing-you-got-sayings-Pin-say-348-/151240344460

Offline AvHdB

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2018, 10:34:37 AM »
You know what they say about alimony, It is the screwing you get for the screwing you had.

"for the screwing you GOT.   

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Alimony-The-Screwing-you-get-for-the-Screwing-you-got-sayings-Pin-say-348-/151240344460

Got is not considered proper/polite American English. Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2018, 11:12:38 AM »

Got is not considered proper/polite American English. Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness. [/font][/size]

Don't think I'll be learning real American English from a Dutch guy no offense.  :ROFL:

"get, got"....this is a phrase.

You ever heard of "you got got?!" 

You have much to learn about American colloquialisms.  Probably the age group you hangin' round with bruv.


Online Guile

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Online Markje

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2018, 11:47:52 AM »
You know what they say about alimony, It is the screwing you get for the screwing you had.

"for the screwing you GOT.   

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Alimony-The-Screwing-you-get-for-the-Screwing-you-got-sayings-Pin-say-348-/151240344460

Got is not considered proper/polite American English. Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness.


Coarseness is par for the course with this saying, so that little low-class word makes it extra genuine...
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Online andrewfi

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2018, 11:49:56 AM »
The use of get/got is purposeful. Repitition serves to reinforce the message of the statement.

...everything ends always well; if it’s still bad, then it’s not the end!

Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2018, 12:21:27 PM »

Got is not considered proper/polite American English. Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness. [/font][/size]

Coarseness is par for the course with this saying, so that little low-class word makes it extra genuine...

No idea how you think "got" is not considered proper/polite.  This word is used in daily speech.

"bro, you got a dollar man?  nah man just got got' aight peace out...

"screwed" is more rude in the same context. 

Offline AvHdB

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2018, 12:31:43 PM »
The use of get/got is purposeful. Repitition serves to reinforce the message of the statement.

Andrew is correct, but bad usage and form only illuminates some ones lack of education.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Offline Confederate

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2018, 12:47:28 PM »
The use of get/got is purposeful. Repitition serves to reinforce the message of the statement.

Andrew is correct, but bad usage and form only illuminates some ones lack of education.


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/someone's

 :coffeeread:
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Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2018, 12:53:07 PM »
Lesson of the day:  Don't take English lessons from a Dutch guy  :laugh:

what AvHdBR2D2 doesn't get is that he said the phrase wrong.  "Got" is the past tense of "Get"...

There is a natural flow to it.  "Had" doesn't fit.

Offline AvHdB

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2018, 12:54:00 PM »
The use of get/got is purposeful. Repitition serves to reinforce the message of the statement.

Andrew is correct, but bad usage and form only illuminates some ones lack of education.


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/someone's

 :coffeeread:

Thank you, shows you can learn something new each day.
tiphat
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Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2018, 01:05:03 PM »

Thank you, shows you can learn something new each day. [/font][/size] tiphat

"every day" would have been a better word choice. 


Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2018, 01:10:48 PM »

 Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness. [/font][/size]

hey AVHDB how many degrees you GOT? :chuckle:

Offline Confederate

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2018, 01:12:40 PM »

Thank you, shows you can learn something new each day. [/font][/size] tiphat

"every day" would have been a better word choice.

Now you’re splitting hairs my friend. Which perhaps is how we got here.

Whoops! Which is perhaps how we arrived here.  :chuckle:  tiphat
Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P. J. O'Rourke

Offline Confederate

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2018, 01:16:26 PM »

 Usage shows a lack of education and coarseness. [/font][/size]

hey AVHDB how many degrees you GOT? :chuckle:

TBH both Andrew and AvHdB are correct. Andrew was correct that the useage was a deliberate part of that phrase.

And Av is correct that if you primarily use “got” perhaps you’re being ghetto and you should polish up your choice of words.   :popcorn:
Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P. J. O'Rourke

Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2018, 01:18:07 PM »

Thank you, shows you can learn something new each day. [/font][/size] tiphat

"every day" would have been a better word choice.

Now you’re splitting hairs my friend. Which perhaps is how we got here.

Whoops! Which is perhaps how we arrived here.  :chuckle:  tiphat

true dat true dat...but him saying the word "got" shows a lack of education and coarseness means bruv ain't know no English. ya dig?

Online Guile

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2018, 01:29:21 PM »
When you hang with "da cats" from Culver City or Inglewood you tend to take on their vernacular.  :chuckle:

I highly doubt our friend AVDH here hangs out with any ethnic minorities of any sort.  He's WASP as WASP gets. 

Offline Manny

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2018, 08:38:16 AM »
Speaking of American grammar.........

"I could care less" - always tickles me.  :chuckle:

And why are y'all always "headed" to somewhere when you are really heading?

Online msmoby

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Re: American English
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2018, 10:12:33 AM »
Who was the American who made braces 'suspenders' ?

THESE are suspenders ..



We won't even go there as to how a fanny became an 'ass' - with is of course an arse

Online msmoby

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2018, 10:13:05 AM »
with which

Online yankee

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Re: American Grammar
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2018, 04:56:22 PM »
climb

VERB
go or come up (a slope, incline, or staircase), especially by using the feet and sometimes the hands; ascend.


But someone can climb down also.
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