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Author Topic: Red Tape getting my son a RU-Citizenship  (Read 110 times)

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Online Markje

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Red Tape getting my son a RU-Citizenship
« on: November 12, 2017, 03:46:20 PM »
Right ,

So more Russian red tape.

I have a newborn son, my second who is now 5 months old. Time for a Russian Nationality since it will save me about 4000 euro by the time he hits 18 years old. After that he can always give it up again.

SO Bureaucracy was so bad, it took me 2 whole weeks to prepare and most of today to scan/print/copy documents. (which we already had translated , notarized, apostilled and notarized again.

We were already aware that soon Russia will change the rules so you can only use the Russian Consulate's notary and not any notary anymore. (grrr). So after the Nationality is done, getting his passport will be even more hassle than last time.

Preparations, first get documents below apostilled and then translated:
 - Fully translated passport of the non-Russian parent by a translator whom is authorized with Russia
 - Fully translated Birth Certificate
 - Fully translated proof of domesticile of the city you live in.

Now, we are ready to make an appointment, but unfortunately the queue is more than 3 months (Grr)

Again:
Apostille and translate : proof of domesticile of the city you live in so it is younger than 3 months old.

Now the appointment is 3 days away and:
- Photocopy all of the above + Consent form of the non-Russian parent (In Russian) with a translated copy of the passport attached.
- Print the application form (In Russian)
- Photocopy of the newborns passport (err, say what, he needs a passport? Luckily we did get one as we remembered that one!)
  * side note, poor us, who need to get a 'passport proof' copy of our new born son photo (sitting upright, no smiling or crying, both ears visible and no hands etc. etc. aaaargh)

And finally: All 3 of us (Both parents + newborn) have to be there @ the consulate finally to get it done on appointment which is soon.

And that is in a clear-cut case of my son being elligible for one.
Whew.
Mark.
You can change anything in life, but a BMW only for a BMW
My first trip to my wife: To Evpatoria!
My road trip to Crimea: Roadtrip to Evpatoria

Offline el_guero

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Re: Red Tape getting my son a RU-Citizenship
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 11:19:30 PM »
How do you get 'apostilled?'

I am preparing notarized papers for an application to Ukraine. But, it looks like I should add the apostill to the notary. BUT, I had never heard of that before.

PS have fun with the kid AND thank God it is no longer the USSR.

Online Markje

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Re: Red Tape getting my son a RU-Citizenship
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 01:19:12 AM »
How do you get 'apostilled?'

I am preparing notarized papers for an application to Ukraine. But, it looks like I should add the apostill to the notary. BUT, I had never heard of that before.

PS have fun with the kid AND thank God it is no longer the USSR.
Apostille is a treaty between world-countries, to which Russia and Ukraine both agreed to.

Getting one is not done at a notary, but in a courthouse.

In the Netherlands its as simple as walking to a court house and pay the money (25 euro). An official paper confirming the authenticity of the document is then glued to the backside (or a second white sheet is glued to it if there is no room) and the whole becomes 1 document inseparable from the other. Finally, the courthouse-stamp is placed on the edges of the document so that removing either will break the seal.

The whole procedure takes less than 10 minutes and can be done without appointment (in Netherlands).

I don't know about Ukraine, but in Russia it isn't necessary to get a notary to sign off on a document if the Apostille-signature is present.

Yesterday my appointment in the Russian consulate was completed. The only pain I had was that a date on one of the Russian application documents was pre-filled wrongly and of course there , you had to fill out the form by hand in Russian! Luckily that was done by the wife and I just needed to sign it.

Mark.
PS: I also had a short interview that confirmed I was ok with getting my son the RU-nationality.
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My first trip to my wife: To Evpatoria!
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Offline Steveboy

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Re: Red Tape getting my son a RU-Citizenship
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 03:38:19 AM »
Right ,

So more Russian red tape.

I have a newborn son, my second who is now 5 months old. Time for a Russian Nationality since it will save me about 4000 euro by the time he hits 18 years old. After that he can always give it up again.

SO Bureaucracy was so bad, it took me 2 whole weeks to prepare and most of today to scan/print/copy documents. (which we already had translated , notarized, apostilled and notarized again.

We were already aware that soon Russia will change the rules so you can only use the Russian Consulate's notary and not any notary anymore. (grrr). So after the Nationality is done, getting his passport will be even more hassle than last time.

Preparations, first get documents below apostilled and then translated:
 - Fully translated passport of the non-Russian parent by a translator whom is authorized with Russia
 - Fully translated Birth Certificate
 - Fully translated proof of domesticile of the city you live in.

Now, we are ready to make an appointment, but unfortunately the queue is more than 3 months (Grr)

Again:
Apostille and translate : proof of domesticile of the city you live in so it is younger than 3 months old.

Now the appointment is 3 days away and:
- Photocopy all of the above + Consent form of the non-Russian parent (In Russian) with a translated copy of the passport attached.
- Print the application form (In Russian)
- Photocopy of the newborns passport (err, say what, he needs a passport? Luckily we did get one as we remembered that one!)
  * side note, poor us, who need to get a 'passport proof' copy of our new born son photo (sitting upright, no smiling or crying, both ears visible and no hands etc. etc. aaaargh)

And finally: All 3 of us (Both parents + newborn) have to be there @ the consulate finally to get it done on appointment which is soon.

And that is in a clear-cut case of my son being elligible for one.
Whew.
Mark.

I wouldn't worry about it to much sounds very easy... you have an easy experience from your sofa in a nice warm house  :)

My wife is from Moldova though her family are all Russian most living in Petersburg, it was ok years back for her to live in Russia with no problems , that all changed some years back and it was changed to just being allowed 90 days without a permit.

Anyway to cut a long story short she went about changing her citizenship that took two years part of which involved standing in a que outside every other week all winter to save her place at the immigration office... so every other Sunday she was there 5am till 12am in -10/20 and immigration in Russia could not give a flying toss about immigrants in Russia for them you are just a piece of shit and treated that way. That is just part of the story you also need to attend for full medical with the kids , same story there the doctors doing the medicals consider you to be a piece of shit , they make it vey clear not to breath on them or go to close to them... :laugh:

I know exactly whats involved to get a citizenship and how immigration treat most.... I have had the same shit also..its not easy living in Russia when you don't have an cushy expat job with a nice work contract for you.

Your story is just like a fairy story I would worry to much over a few bits of paperwork and red tape its life