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Author Topic: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth  (Read 415 times)

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Online Maxx

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Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« on: January 31, 2017, 10:19:59 PM »
http://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/1/31/14457678/trump-order-immigrants-welfare?yptr=yahoo

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This executive action, though — according to the draft obtained by Vox, which seems consistent with the Post’s reporting — would ask the Department of Homeland Security to issue a rule saying that an immigrant can’t be admitted to the US if he’s likely to get any benefit “determined in any way on the basis of income, resources, or financial need.”

People who use any of those benefits and are in the US on visas would be subject to deportation. And the order would even require the person who sponsored an immigrant into the US to reimburse the federal government for any benefits the immigrant used (something that the government can theoretically ask for in individual cases now, but rarely does).

Remember that guy down in Texas who I know who is divorcing his Ukrainian wife? She's on all sorts of aid including subsidized housing. If this goes through he's going to be poorer than a church mouse. AND all those guys who sponsor RW/UW into the US may deeply regret it later. My observation is most of these marriages fail and the women go onto social services of some kind, especially at first. This eventually could become as damaging to the M.O.B. industry (What's left of it) as was I.M.B.R.A.

Online dcguyusa

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2017, 06:46:52 PM »
I do not think that this is really anything new.  The intent is that the immigrant who enters this country does not receive social program benefits while as required to be provided for by the petitioner.  If the immigrant later becomes a citizen, then the support provisions of the petitioner no longer apply.  I filed the form over 15 years ago, and the intent is that I have to "pay up" for the immigrant during his/her stay here.  The important consideration in the ruling is if a person is likely to receive benefits (without the assistance of the petitioner) which then denies you admittance.  That might imply that only rich foreigners can enter this country, which would be highly prejudiced.

Offline Gipsy

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2017, 01:07:32 AM »
I do not think that this is really anything new.  The intent is that the immigrant who enters this country does not receive social program benefits while as required to be provided for by the petitioner.  If the immigrant later becomes a citizen, then the support provisions of the petitioner no longer apply.  I filed the form over 15 years ago, and the intent is that I have to "pay up" for the immigrant during his/her stay here.  The important consideration in the ruling is if a person is likely to receive benefits (without the assistance of the petitioner) which then denies you admittance. That might imply that only rich foreigners can enter this country, which would be highly prejudiced.

But why should anyone be allowed to enter your country and become a burden to the tax payers?..

That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..


Online Maxx

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2017, 07:54:50 AM »
I do not think that this is really anything new.  I filed the form over 15 years ago,

I filed it 13 years ago. During my divorce that same year I was told by the retired District Director of Minnesota, North and South Dakota that it was nothing to worry about. The Affidavit of Support was not enforced. Now according to this article Donald Trump's get tough policy with immigrants, which I support, that might change. The upshot of it is there could be lasting economic consequences for sponsors of these failed marriages. 

Online msmoby

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2017, 09:36:09 AM »


But why should anyone be allowed to enter your country and become a burden to the tax payers?..

That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Gypo,

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

It also applies to EU/ EEA nationals bringing in their partners ... that period is five years as the whole point of settling on that basis is self-sufficiency - if one claims - it could mean you'd not be successful in obtaining permanent residency

Regarding schooling - are you suggesting it's not OK for  - say Chris - who used the UK route or myself using the EU immigration route for our extended families to have access to education ?

I know of several families where the non UK spouse worked and paid taxes and social welfare during this period - so why shouldn't their kids benefit ?








Online dcguyusa

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2017, 05:38:46 PM »
I do not think that this is really anything new.  The intent is that the immigrant who enters this country does not receive social program benefits while as required to be provided for by the petitioner.  If the immigrant later becomes a citizen, then the support provisions of the petitioner no longer apply.  I filed the form over 15 years ago, and the intent is that I have to "pay up" for the immigrant during his/her stay here.  The important consideration in the ruling is if a person is likely to receive benefits (without the assistance of the petitioner) which then denies you admittance. That might imply that only rich foreigners can enter this country, which would be highly prejudiced.

But why should anyone be allowed to enter your country and become a burden to the tax payers?..

That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Well there apparently are many illegals in this country getting social program benefits.  The Affidavit was meant to block the immigrant from becoming a public charge if they could "pin the blame of responsibility" to the petitioner (or a sponsor).  I have relatives who have never worked one day in this country and they get a SSI stipend and Medicaid even more than my mother who has worked in this country for 25 years.  There are people who could not contribute to the system due to age or other issues and "leaving them out in cold" to live a homeless existence  seems to be cruel and against the immigrant ideals regarding the founding of this country.

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Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.

Online dcguyusa

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2017, 05:49:02 PM »
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The Affidavit of Support was not enforced.

Not surprised at all.  You could get away with a lot of stuff in this country.  :o

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The upshot of it is there could be lasting economic consequences for sponsors of these failed marriages.

I would like to see them try it.  Passing a law is one thing.  Enforcing it is another.  Look at all of the child support scofflaws in this country.

http://www.pottsmerc.com/article/MP/20170111/NEWS/170119915

Offline Manny

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2017, 01:18:28 AM »
That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

The 'no recourse to public funding' applies to benefits; not healthcare.

Online Ste

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2017, 01:26:44 AM »
That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

The 'no recourse to public funding' applies to benefits; not healthcare.

Kind of different now, migrants have to pay the IHS, roughly £200 a year or part year in return for NHS access on top of the ordinary application fees.
O pointy birds, o pointy pointy, Anoint my head, anointy-nointy.

Offline Manny

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2017, 01:28:38 AM »
That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

The 'no recourse to public funding' applies to benefits; not healthcare.

Kind of different now, migrants have to pay the IHS, roughly £200 a year or part year in return for NHS access on top of the ordinary application fees.

What does £200 cover? 3 GP appointments? Its not enough.

Online Ste

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2017, 01:29:37 AM »
That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

The 'no recourse to public funding' applies to benefits; not healthcare.

Kind of different now, migrants have to pay the IHS, roughly £200 a year or part year in return for NHS access on top of the ordinary application fees.

What does £200 cover? 3 GP appointments? Its not enough.

Completely agree...
O pointy birds, o pointy pointy, Anoint my head, anointy-nointy.

Online Maxx

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2017, 04:59:17 AM »
New article today on this subject.

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article130443944.html

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The wall along the border with Mexico isn’t the only one under construction orders.

The immigration ban isn’t limited just to refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries.

No, President Donald Trump hasn’t backed down on his radical campaign promises. He’s just delivering them in one shocking executive order after another.

There’s a lot more walling off of immigrants from the rest of the U.S. population to come from Donald Trump’s administration, according to drafts of a new immigration executive order leaked to The Washington Post and Vox.com and making the rounds in Washington.

The order would essentially erect a financial wall around immigration — and it would hurt not only would-be immigrants, but legal immigrants already in the country and the U.S. residents and citizens helping them get here.

You know that brother you brought from Cuba — signed his visa petition, pledged to sponsor him — then sent on his merry way to carve a new life in the United States?

The Trump administration thinks he’s your burden, not that of the American taxpayers, and they’re going to make you, the sponsor, pay for all of his expenses until he can become the ideal self-sufficient immigrant. So long to the public benefits that legal immigrants are now allowed to access.

Start praying that your loved one doesn’t fall on hard times or require medical care not covered by insurance — just two scenarios that could send anyone into bankruptcy. If you’re the immigrant’s sponsor, the financial responsibility for his misfortune wouldn’t only be the immigrant’s but yours, too.

If Trump signs the executive order, only U.S. citizens wealthy enough to support relatives — through good times and bad — would be entitled to family reunification. Who else can foot a hospital bill that in this country runs into the thousands of dollars the moment you walk in? What if the immigrant loses a job and needs to ask for cash assistance? The sponsor would have to provide the help, not the government.

As for immigrants already here, a history of using welfare would be grounds to deny residency or citizenship. Deportation costs would fall on the shoulders of the immigrant or the sponsor. As Vox.com summed up the executive order: “Build a wall around public benefits, and make immigrants’ relatives pay for it.”

The White House won’t confirm or deny the existence of the executive order, but the draft is in circulation among administration officials, according to the Post. Written in memorandum form by Andrew Bermberg, assistant to the president and the director of the Domestic Policy Council, it clearly spells out that only the wealthy need apply.

Only people well-heeled enough to support themselves — or with the connections and ability to quickly become established and instantly join the American middle class — would be able to obtain visas to come into this country legally.

Any sponsor of an immigrant who seeks welfare benefits would have to reimburse the government for the costs the immigrant is incurring. The measure gives a whole new meaning to being responsible for not just your children but other adults. Who can control the decisions people make down the line after they’re in this country?

If this executive order becomes reality, the shock and distress in immigrant communities like Miami’s would be unfathomable. The implications for legal residents and U.S. citizens hoping to reunite with family members are far-reaching and unpredictable. But a predictable outcome would be more people living in the shadows and working in underground economies for survival.

This policy-making, based on misplaced blame and fear, is another Machiavellian move to create division and mistrust by demonizing all immigrants as welfare-dependent and cheats. But studies done to address immigration reform show that immigrants are a big part of the economic engine that drives this country, and in fact, natives and immigrants complement each other in the workforce.

But immigrants don’t seem to catch a break under Donald Trump’s watch. And with this order, we’re not created equal, even after we’re residents and citizens.

Lady Liberty, who’s that?

Lifting up the poor and compassion are words exiled from the American vocabulary in Trumplandia.

Only faked perfection and personal wealth — lots and lots of money to pay for the high price of a dignified life in America — are allowed.

Fabiola Santiago: fsantiago @miami herald.com, @fabiola santiago


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article130443944.html#storylink=cpy

Offline Gipsy

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2017, 05:08:13 AM »



But why should anyone be allowed to enter your country and become a burden to the tax payers?..

That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Gypo,

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

Of course I am aware.


It also applies to EU/ EEA nationals bringing in their partners ... that period is five years as the whole point of settling on that basis is self-sufficiency - if one claims - it could mean you'd not be successful in obtaining permanent residency

Correctly so.


Regarding schooling - are you suggesting it's not OK for  - say Chris - who used the UK route or myself using the EU immigration route for our extended families to have access to education ?

Only if they pay for it themselves.


I know of several families where the non UK spouse worked and paid taxes and social welfare during this period - so why shouldn't their kids benefit ?

Only after the initial period of min 2 years.

It is MHO that said people should not get anything for the public purse until they have contributed for a min of 2 years, before that they should pay for everything themselves, that includes schooling, health, everything that will help reduce the taxpayers burden...
We pay out more for these people whilst forgetting to give those who have contributed to the economy for all their lives a pittance of a pension.

Offline Gipsy

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2017, 05:14:01 AM »
That's where the UK is wrong also IMHO..

Nobody should be allowed to claim any government funding to live, be schooled, be treated health wise, until they have contributed into the system for at least a couple of years.. again, my HO..

Are you aware of the long existing rules re UK immigration re introducing a spouse to the UK - during the probationary period - Formal Leave to Remain "no resource to public funding " ?

The 'no recourse to public funding' applies to benefits; not healthcare.

Kind of different now, migrants have to pay the IHS, roughly £200 a year or part year in return for NHS access on top of the ordinary application fees.

Its nowhere near enough, £200 covers very little, they should be made to pay 100% of all costs for any treatment and medicines, and dental treatment..

Immigrants/migrants/asylum seekers pay a big 0, where's the justice in that, if they knew that they would be required to pay for everything themselves, they would think twice about trying to get in

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Re: Beware, the 'Affidavit of Support' might be getting some teeth
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2017, 09:12:42 AM »
It's at times during these often heated debates, that those like Moby forget that immigrants don't need to come to the UK. There's plenty countries in this world to chose from and many more with cultures closer to their own but it seems many want to come here and its not for our fabulous weather.

It's not about being unfair but in fact its about being completely fair. Should said person wish to uproot and come to the UK, then they should be aware that they come under their own steam, pay into our system like the natives do and after that they can enjoy the benefits it brings. What is so right wing, racist or unfair about being fair??

Only parasites or lazy undesirables would object to that. If I wanted to relocate my family and was told that I had to work in my new country, contribute and build credibility before enjoying the benefits then I'd accept it if I really wanted to become their citizen. If I was a lazy sod looking to milk another countries kindness and didn't like the new UK rules then I wouldn't move to the UK.

Simples.