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Author Topic: Spicing up bland Russian food....  (Read 1515 times)

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Online Dogsoldier

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2017, 01:30:19 PM »
My wife is a pretty good cook, but she makes a couple of things that
are similar to eating dried yard clippings.

Bland tasteless chicken soup:I add garlic, white pepper (not too much)
and a 1/4 cup of vinegar. Then drop and egg or two in it and stir it around and
add soy sauce to taste. Now I have Chinese hot and sour soup. 

Bland tasteless rice: I throw it in a pan with oil and fry it. I add onions,
vegetables, meat and some soy sauce. I make a hole in the center and fry an
egg and then mix it together. Now I have tasty Chinese fried rice.
Why not just teach her the above? Problem solved.
All I know is that Moby knows nothing - Plato.
Wiz loves talking out of his A******e.

Offline Manny

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2017, 03:36:15 PM »
My wife is a pretty good cook, but she makes a couple of things that
are similar to eating dried yard clippings.

Bland tasteless chicken soup:I add garlic, white pepper (not too much)
and a 1/4 cup of vinegar. Then drop and egg or two in it and stir it around and
add soy sauce to taste. Now I have Chinese hot and sour soup. 

Bland tasteless rice: I throw it in a pan with oil and fry it. I add onions,
vegetables, meat and some soy sauce. I make a hole in the center and fry an
egg and then mix it together. Now I have tasty Chinese fried rice.
Why not just teach her the above? Problem solved.

Indeed. Like most FSU women, my wife used to cook a lot of interesting stuff - quite well - that was maybe a little too dreary for the Brit palate. I always liked garlic and beetroot so I was on a starter for ten. Now she has discovered spices, sauces and seasonings, she can knock out a very respectable Jalfrezi. But the Chinese food and fried rice is still left to me. Despite the fact she has been to China with me, me having been more often, makes me "know more" so Chinese cooking is left to me. Cop out if you ask me........

Seriously though, Russians dont do spices so much. It's all dreary buckwheat and 365 things to do with a white cabbage, a gallon of mayonnaise and a long-deceased herring. In culinary terms too, marriage is a journey.

A decade married, and wifey is all over the soy sauce, chillies, and any and every spice you can think of. She will now eat curry, and English breakfast (if i made it and it's organic) and has even nailed Roti (with Duchy organic brown flour).
please tell me where I'm being / have been 'dishonest'? 
Yes, he said that.........

Online Dogsoldier

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2017, 12:14:21 AM »
My wife is a pretty good cook, but she makes a couple of things that
are similar to eating dried yard clippings.

Bland tasteless chicken soup:I add garlic, white pepper (not too much)
and a 1/4 cup of vinegar. Then drop and egg or two in it and stir it around and
add soy sauce to taste. Now I have Chinese hot and sour soup. 

Bland tasteless rice: I throw it in a pan with oil and fry it. I add onions,
vegetables, meat and some soy sauce. I make a hole in the center and fry an
egg and then mix it together. Now I have tasty Chinese fried rice.
Why not just teach her the above? Problem solved.

Indeed. Like most FSU women, my wife used to cook a lot of interesting stuff - quite well - that was maybe a little too dreary for the Brit palate. I always liked garlic and beetroot so I was on a starter for ten. Now she has discovered spices, sauces and seasonings, she can knock out a very respectable Jalfrezi. But the Chinese food and fried rice is still left to me. Despite the fact she has been to China with me, me having been more often, makes me "know more" so Chinese cooking is left to me. Cop out if you ask me........

Seriously though, Russians dont do spices so much. It's all dreary buckwheat and 365 things to do with a white cabbage, a gallon of mayonnaise and a long-deceased herring. In culinary terms too, marriage is a journey.

A decade married, and wifey is all over the soy sauce, chillies, and any and every spice you can think of. She will now eat curry, and English breakfast (if i made it and it's organic) and has even nailed Roti (with Duchy organic brown flour).
Dishing out a Roti  :chuckle: now that is quite an achievement.
Wifey has started experimenting too and can knock out a respectable Palak Paneer and Dal.
She was exposed to Indian food on our honeymoon in the Andaman Islands. Has loved it since and her tolerance to the heat (in culinery terms) has risen with time.
Just as well, seeing as we will be moving to those exotic climes soon.
All I know is that Moby knows nothing - Plato.
Wiz loves talking out of his A******e.


Offline Gipsy

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2017, 12:18:17 AM »
The history of Borsch is interesting.

The origins of Borsch stem much further back than the beginning of Ukraine as a country.

Ukraine has the pleasure of being the first country to add beetroot to the recipe.

I much prefer borsch without beetroot, known as "White borsch".

Whichever version one prefers, all are rather bland, so I normally add ginger, which helps the taste IMO..

Not being from a family liking "Hot", "Garlicy" or very "Spicy" food (Which my stomach reacts against, and wifey just does not like), I find the adding ginger appeases my taste buds for such a normally bland food.
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Offline Gipsy

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Re: Spicing up bland Ukranian food....
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2017, 12:20:57 AM »
1/ Fixed the title - as Borsch is surely Ukrainian in origin?

Borsch is of many cultures. I wouldn't claim myself English now, because I am of english origin centuries ago?

Your anti-Russian is showing again.

I personally think this plonker should be thrown off the site because he is absolutely a troll. I originally assumed his opinion was the polar opposite of everyone he conversed with and he was just one of these awkward idiots who blissfully walks against the flow of life.

Sadly he admitted a few days back that this place is for enjoyment and its clear he drags people into arguments and wastes posters time. Nobody forces us to answer him but it doesn't seem right letting a looney loose to type lies and propaganda unchallenged.

Throwing him out would also allow him to think he's been censored for disagreeing with Manny but we all know what a troll Moby is. 

 :dh:

Seconded..  :thumbsup:
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Online msmoby

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2017, 06:45:46 AM »
The history of Borsch is interesting.

The origins of Borsch stem much further back than the beginning of Ukraine as a country.


Ukraine has the pleasure of being the first country to add beetroot to the recipe.

I much prefer borsch without beetroot, known as "White borsch".

Whichever version one prefers, all are rather bland, so I normally add ginger, which helps the taste IMO..

Not being from a family liking "Hot", "Garlicy" or very "Spicy" food (Which my stomach reacts against, and wifey just does not like), I find the adding ginger appeases my taste buds for such a normally bland food.
[/quote]

From a Ukrainian:

''Ukrainians did put hot peppers in their borscht.  There is one small red pepper that is very hot.   They might dip it in borscht (too potent to include it).


Beets were unknown in Russia until the mid 19th century.  So nope, borscht did not originate in Russia."

Gypo: I suspect you need me 'gone' as I 'know nothing' about Russian Trains ? :)


Russia doesn't have form for making stuff like this up.
He really did say that
Here is my Russophobia/Kremlinphobia topic

Online 2tallbill

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Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2017, 10:20:05 AM »
Why not just teach her the above? Problem solved.

Because she likes bland tasteless soup and rice, so occasionally she cooks it.

FSUW are not for entry level daters. FSUW don't do vague FSUW like a man of action so be a man of action  If you find a promising girl, get your butt on a plane. There are a hundred ways to be successful and a thousand ways to f#ck it up
Kiss the girl, don't ask her first.
Get an apartment not a hotel. DON'T recycle girls

Online 2tallbill

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2017, 10:22:50 AM »
It's all dreary buckwheat and 365 things to do with a white cabbage, a gallon of mayonnaise and a long-deceased herring. In culinary terms too, marriage is a journey.

 :chuckle:   :nod:   :laugh:
FSUW are not for entry level daters. FSUW don't do vague FSUW like a man of action so be a man of action  If you find a promising girl, get your butt on a plane. There are a hundred ways to be successful and a thousand ways to f#ck it up
Kiss the girl, don't ask her first.
Get an apartment not a hotel. DON'T recycle girls

Offline Ste

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2017, 10:39:22 AM »
It's all dreary buckwheat and 365 things to do with a white cabbage, a gallon of mayonnaise and a long-deceased herring. In culinary terms too, marriage is a journey.

 :chuckle:   :nod:   :laugh:

Never ever try the Swedish delicacy Surströmming, most of the EU has banned it in enclosed spaces, it smells so bad.

It's basically rotting herring in a tin. I've seen the tins, they're bloated cos of the putrid gasses. The Danes are not daft enough to open them to try though flatmate was warned me never to even think about trying it.
O pointy birds, o pointy pointy, Anoint my head, anointy-nointy.

Online Dogsoldier

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Re: Spicing up bland Russian food....
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2017, 11:30:00 AM »
Why not just teach her the above? Problem solved.

Because she likes bland tasteless soup and rice, so occasionally she cooks it.
You misunderstood. Teach her to cook it for you:chuckle:
All I know is that Moby knows nothing - Plato.
Wiz loves talking out of his A******e.

Online Confederate

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Re: Spicing up bland Ukranian food....
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2017, 11:56:09 AM »
1/ Fixed the title - as Borsch is surely Ukrainian in origin?

Borsch is of many cultures. I wouldn't claim myself English now, because I am of english origin centuries ago?

Your anti-Russian is showing again.

I personally think this plonker should be thrown off the site because he is absolutely a troll. I originally assumed his opinion was the polar opposite of everyone he conversed with and he was just one of these awkward idiots who blissfully walks against the flow of life.

Sadly he admitted a few days back that this place is for enjoyment and its clear he drags people into arguments and wastes posters time. Nobody forces us to answer him but it doesn't seem right letting a looney loose to type lies and propaganda unchallenged.

Throwing him out would also allow him to think he's been censored for disagreeing with Manny but we all know what a troll Moby is. 

 :dh:

Seconded..  :thumbsup:

Third. He pollutes every thread with half truths, propaganda or outright lies. His inane ramblings about the US election and Trump being a perfect example.
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