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Author Topic: The Value of the Ruble  (Read 5383 times)

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Offline Texan77

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2017, 03:23:16 PM »
If you do not like my post tell me what is wrong with it? I do not take it personally unless you attack me personally. This makes for discussion. The world is in a complete financial mess and Russia is not any better than everyone else. Russia is the world largest energy producer and like most large producer this becomes a very large part of their foreign trade. Their Currency will vary a lot based of their balance of trade like all countries. Since oil is very volatile the Russian currency varies more than most countries. Other large producer countries also have this problem.

Online Confederate

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2017, 03:32:45 PM »
If you do not like my post tell me what is wrong with it? I do not take it personally unless you attack me personally. This makes for discussion. The world is in a complete financial mess and Russia is not any better than everyone else. Russia is the world largest energy producer and like most large producer this becomes a very large part of their foreign trade. Their Currency will vary a lot based of their balance of trade like all countries. Since oil is very volatile the Russian currency varies more than most countries. Other large producer countries also have this problem.

Both the Saudi's and the Russians will be pissed if Trump manages to boost up US oil production WAY UP.  :coffeeread:

Offline Texan77

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2017, 11:28:16 PM »
Solar is the real problem long term for the oil producers. By early 2020's Solar will start to make a real difference. Power companies here in the USA pay about 5 cents per KW for solar power and pay 9 cents per KW for natural gas power.  Solar is likely to get to be a lot less in not too many years. Here in this link even Ukraine is starting converting to solar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9naX7aJbsE

I think the Key stone pipe line will be a huge financial mistake and will never pay for itself.


Offline Jerash

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2017, 02:45:16 AM »
Hi guys. With reference to the topic of this thread, I would be I interested in any advice you care to offer me. I've relocated to Moscow for the long term. I have about $5,000USD in cash money, which I've been exchanging in little bits to rubles. The ruble has been gaining steam for awhile and I'm wondering what might be a prudent strategy for me going forward. I'm a little bit nervous that my stack of cash is declining in value every day.


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Online Steveboy

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2017, 03:57:31 AM »
Hi guys. With reference to the topic of this thread, I would be I interested in any advice you care to offer me. I've relocated to Moscow for the long term. I have about $5,000USD in cash money, which I've been exchanging in little bits to rubles. The ruble has been gaining steam for awhile and I'm wondering what might be a prudent strategy for me going forward. I'm a little bit nervous that my stack of cash is declining in value every day.


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If I was you I would change it up tonight! But so the news says here the Rouble will be going down next month..

What ever you do don't get robbed ..If I even had $200 on me in would be in my shoe :laugh:

Thats not just in Russia thats anywhere..
I support no government anywhere, ever, never. No institution, No religion!!

Offline Gipsy

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2017, 04:26:18 AM »
Hi guys. With reference to the topic of this thread, I would be I interested in any advice you care to offer me. I've relocated to Moscow for the long term. I have about $5,000USD in cash money, which I've been exchanging in little bits to rubles. The ruble has been gaining steam for awhile and I'm wondering what might be a prudent strategy for me going forward. I'm a little bit nervous that my stack of cash is declining in value every day.


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Damned if you do, and damned if you don't.

In your position I would probably hedge my bets, by changing 50% of it into r, and keep the rest in $
Bridge is a lot like sex, either you need a good partner, or a decent hand... Woody Allen

Offline Boris

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2017, 07:07:43 AM »
I have 2500 hryvnia left from my last trip. I think I'll put it in my shoe...Thanks SB for the tip...:-))

Online Confederate

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2017, 07:32:20 AM »
Solar is the real problem long term for the oil producers. By early 2020's Solar will start to make a real difference. Power companies here in the USA pay about 5 cents per KW for solar power and pay 9 cents per KW for natural gas power.  Solar is likely to get to be a lot less in not too many years. Here in this link even Ukraine is starting converting to solar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9naX7aJbsE

I think the Key stone pipe line will be a huge financial mistake and will never pay for itself.

I disagree. And I don't see Solar as becoming cost effective or profitable for a decade or more. For now oil is still cheap enough and motors will continue to become more efficient whether gasoline or diesel.

Online AvHdB

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2017, 07:36:07 AM »
Hi guys. With reference to the topic of this thread, I would be I interested in any advice you care to offer me. I've relocated to Moscow for the long term. I have about $5,000USD in cash money, which I've been exchanging in little bits to rubles. The ruble has been gaining steam for awhile and I'm wondering what might be a prudent strategy for me going forward. I'm a little bit nervous that my stack of cash is declining in value every day.
.

Damned if you do, and damned if you don't.

In your position I would probably hedge my bets, by changing 50% of it into r, and keep the rest in $

Gypsy is giving good (and free) advice.

Bear in mind $5,000.= US is a razor thin amount to re-establish your self on in a foreign country.

Hopefully you can start a Maxx sort of thread about your expierence in Mother Russia.
BTW I’m looking forward to the next Civil War in the USA
 

Offline Jerash

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2017, 08:10:42 AM »
Yeah, far to say it is razor thin, but it's enough to get started and support myself for a few months. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I'm not coming here rich, I'm coming to get rich, well or at least to make a living :) I've got a bit more in my Canadian bank account too.  And, you could say this is an investment in another way too as by being here, I'll actually be extinguishing my debts much more quickly (that's a bit of a story).

Still haven't found a more permanent living situation yet. But in the process of searching, I already have an offer of work. I get the feeling I'm not going to have too much trouble earning ok money here.

I think it comes down to something Danchik has said somewhere before - with the economic crisis, most of the expats left. And although the demand for good paying gigs is down, I think the supply of native speakers available to do this gigs dropped down even further. So for those who are here on the ground, I suspect there is some good money to be made by those who are willing to work for it. This is my working theory at the moment.


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Online andrewfi

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2017, 10:20:33 AM »
Sadly, many folks get all mixed up because they think that the only use for oil is to make their car work.
There's a fair few of those people here, posting upthread.

Pretty much anything that is made of plastic used oil in its creation.
The roads you drive on are made with oil.

In fact here's a partial list of stuff made with oil:
Clothing                    Ink                            Heart Valves           Crayons
Parachutes            Telephones           Antiseptics           Deodorant
Pantyhose            Rubbing Alcohol   Carpets                   Hearing Aids
Motorcycle helmets   Pillows                   Shoes                   Electrical tape
Safety glass           Nylon rope           Fertilizers                   Hair coloring
Toilet seats           Candles                   Credit cards           Aspirin
Golf balls                   Detergents           Sunglasses           Glue
Fishing rods           Linoleum                   Soft contact lenses   Trash bags
Hand lotion           Shampoo                   Shaving cream           Footballs
Paint brushes           Balloons                   Fan belts                   Umbrellas
Luggage                   Antifreeze                   Tires                           Dishwashing liquids
Toothbrushes           Toothpaste           Combs                   Tents
Lipstick                   Tennis rackets           House paint           Guitar strings
Ammonia                   Eyeglasses           Ice chests           Life jackets
Cameras                   Artificial turf           Artificial Limbs           Bandages
Dentures                   Ballpoint pens           Nail polish           Caulking
Skis                           Fishing lures           Perfumes                   Shoe polish
Antihistamines           Cortisone            Dyes                   Roofing

Only about 50% of oil, in the USA is used for making cars and trucks work. The rest goes for other purposes. Even if cars run on electricity then oil is used so all that happens is the direct usage shifts a little but the volume remains the same. Many transport, heating and energy usages can not be, economically, substituted.

You guys are going to be sucking at the teat of Mother Earth for a while longer.
"For what else is the life of man but a kind of play in which men in various costumes perform until the director motions them offstage?" -Erasmus

Online andrewfi

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2017, 10:24:24 AM »
Jerash, I do not know what your goals are but, whilst there is some truth in what you suggest the following also applies:
1) For roles that require high standards of English there's plenty of Russians with a high standard of English.
2) Where foreigners are employed, and, yes they are, the formerly applicable foreigner premium is no longer paid. You will get paid, in most cases, no more (and often less) than a local candidate. Your problem is that you are not fluent in the native language and that is a huge limiting factor.

And, OMG, $5K is NOTHING!
"For what else is the life of man but a kind of play in which men in various costumes perform until the director motions them offstage?" -Erasmus

Online Steveboy

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2017, 11:57:32 AM »
I have 2500 hryvnia left from my last trip. I think I'll put it in my shoe...Thanks SB for the tip...:-))

I was only kidding!!  :chuckle: I don't ever carry any cash or cards on me..I certainly haven't got time to keep bending over to take my shoe off in a shop.. :ROFL:
I support no government anywhere, ever, never. No institution, No religion!!

Offline Danchik

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2017, 12:08:07 PM »
Jerash, I do not know what your goals are but, whilst there is some truth in what you suggest the following also applies:
1) For roles that require high standards of English there's plenty of Russians with a high standard of English.
2) Where foreigners are employed, and, yes they are, the formerly applicable foreigner premium is no longer paid. You will get paid, in most cases, no more (and often less) than a local candidate. Your problem is that you are not fluent in the native language and that is a huge limiting factor.
Nonsense.
When it is dark enough, men see the stars.

Offline Jerash

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Re: The Value of the Ruble
« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2017, 02:29:44 PM »
Jerash, I do not know what your goals are but, whilst there is some truth in what you suggest the following also applies:
1) For roles that require high standards of English there's plenty of Russians with a high standard of English.
2) Where foreigners are employed, and, yes they are, the formerly applicable foreigner premium is no longer paid. You will get paid, in most cases, no more (and often less) than a local candidate. Your problem is that you are not fluent in the native language and that is a huge limiting factor.

And, OMG, $5K is NOTHING!

That's an interesting comment Andrew.

On point one, yes there are highly qualified Russians to teach English. I am taking a certification course with them right now.

I also know that Native Speakers are exotic and interesting and offer a different style of teaching. Like a breath of fresh air. I also know that some Russians feel they are wasting their money to go to English courses if they can't have a Native Speaker.

On your second point, I just don't know where you are getting this information. All my experience so far points in the opposite direction.  A Russian teaching English does not get paid more than a Native Speaker. That's just a straight forward fact.

Finally, 5K is not nothing. Without any other form of income, it is 5-6 months of living if I'm careful. That's s lot - 5 months to allow me to land on my feet properly and get going. That's 5 months unemployed.  Yet, I can start generating income next week if I want, which stretches it even farther.

I'm not a rich old geezer looking for my gold digger. I'm a young enough man with the courage to go do something completely new, and put the energy into it to be successful. For that, 5K is plenty.


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