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Author Topic: Friend refused a B-2 visa  (Read 628 times)

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Offline Rdkng07

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Friend refused a B-2 visa
« on: June 15, 2016, 09:16:08 PM »
Hello, I've only posted in the new members introductions some time ago. I would first like to say thanks for the forum and all the information it has been a good help to me. So, I have a friend from Russia that I have met on a dating site, Russian Cupid I believe. We agreed she would visit but she was denied a visa in Yekaterinburg. I would gladly meet somewhere, and we probably will, but she requested to visit my home. She lives in Omsk, I live in a small town of about 40,000 or so.

Facts:
I am 54 years old and she is 54 as well.
I contacted her and we have been meeting on Skype for about 2 months now.
She has two daughters and two grandchildren.
She has enough savings and an apartment that she owns, and a decent job.
She was refused a tourist visa because they said she lacks sufficient ties to return to Russia. I read the letter and I think it was section 214 or something.

Question, if I understood the letter correctly, denial for this particular reason cannot be appealed? I will not do a K-1 because we have never been together, and I don't think she would either. We are both old enough to know better. Does anyone know or have any ideas how she can get a tourist visa? An agency  of some sort maybe?

Thanks for your time.

Rodger





Online Maxx

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2016, 09:33:07 PM »
Hi Rodger

Perhaps you should visit her? I was in Ekaterinburg 15 years ago and it is an interesting city. I would like to revisit it someday.

Offline Chris

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2016, 01:44:13 AM »
Why was she pushing to visit you? go and meet her in her home town first, it's the best way.


Offline Steveboy

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2016, 04:40:17 AM »
The man always goes meet the women first its as simple as that  :)

Offline Rdkng07

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2016, 05:53:32 AM »
Thank You for the replies. Yes I have no problem visiting her wherever, it was her idea to come here as I only have limited vacation until it resets in mid-September. I didn’t see any harm in her visiting.

However, once things get rolling we will still at some point have to address the issue of her coming to visit. I don’t understand how having two daughters and grandchildren is not sufficient ties for returning.

My country lets in illegals on the southern border by the thousands, in fact they are encouraging it. And when one decent person wants to make a legitimate visit they say no, what a crock of shit.

Anyway, it looks like multiple visits out of country and then a K-1 if it heads in that direction. Not how I wanted to do it, I would have preferred for her to visit my home a couple of times to see how we like it.

Thanks again, I will look for agency or something, but I am not holding my breath.

Online yankee

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2016, 06:18:20 AM »
The man always goes meet the women first its as simple as that  :)

My wife and I met in Rome for our "first date".  Then we met in Barcelone, then in Paris.  After all of this we met in her home town. 
What is worse than not being able to get what you don't even want?

Offline Gipsy

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2016, 06:36:00 AM »
Thank You for the replies. Yes I have no problem visiting her wherever, it was her idea to come here as I only have limited vacation until it resets in mid-September. I didn’t see any harm in her visiting.

However, once things get rolling we will still at some point have to address the issue of her coming to visit. I don’t understand how having two daughters and grandchildren is not sufficient ties for returning.

My country lets in illegals on the southern border by the thousands, in fact they are encouraging it. And when one decent person wants to make a legitimate visit they say no, what a crock of shit.

Anyway, it looks like multiple visits out of country and then a K-1 if it heads in that direction. Not how I wanted to do it, I would have preferred for her to visit my home a couple of times to see how we like it.

Thanks again, I will look for agency or something, but I am not holding my breath.

Hi,
I am no expert on US visa's I'm afraid, so my input to your question is limited to my experience with UK visit visa's for Russian citizens..
How does one prove that they will return to Russia when their visit is over, that's the difficult part, it seems that, within the current laid down evidence requirements, the decision as to "return evidence" is still dependant on the visa official who is making the final decisions, one can only supply as much evidence as possible, and hope for the best.
Your g/f's info seems to have somehow caused concern, yes, she has children and grandchildren in Russia, her own apartment, a good job,.
Did she supply evidence of money in her bank account in sufficient quantity to cover her flights, hotels, and living expenses, or was the application made reliant upon you to cover these?
Did she, or does she have a mortgage for her apartment, or debt for an auto purchase on finance, or even other debts such as credit cards?
Did she supply a letter from her employer stating her holidays are xxxxxxxx and would return to work on xxxxxxxxx date?
Does she have any elderly parents who are reliant on her?
Did the application state you by name, and that she would be stopping with you and that you would be responsible for her costs/living expenses, did you supply evidence of your capability to cover such expenses?
Some/more of these questions may not be relevant for a US Visit visa.
Obviously, you will need a few visits t her, and meetings in other countries to obtain evidence for any other type of visa application, so keep together all tickets, invoices, along with verifiable photos of/at such meets, which may also help in obtaining a visit visa in the future.

This may/may not help you, but I hope it does....

Online msmoby

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2016, 09:31:14 AM »
Why was she pushing to visit you? go and meet her in her home town first, it's the best way.

The man always goes meet the women first its as simple as that  :)

Hi Rdkng07

I'm not American - so no help re the immigration front - other than knowing you'd have to have met in person to go for a K-1, at all

Whilst I don't agree that the man must go to the lady .... [I invited my former FSUW to my place - as the weather would be better - and met her family on the second visit.] you've got no option, now

Meeting for the first time - in a third country - I would not recommend - esp. if the lady suggests it.









Offline Fashionista

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2016, 11:20:49 AM »
Thank You for the replies. Yes I have no problem visiting her wherever, it was her idea to come here as I only have limited vacation until it resets in mid-September. I didn’t see any harm in her visiting.

However, once things get rolling we will still at some point have to address the issue of her coming to visit. I don’t understand how having two daughters and grandchildren is not sufficient ties for returning.

My country lets in illegals on the southern border by the thousands, in fact they are encouraging it. And when one decent person wants to make a legitimate visit they say no, what a crock of shit.

Anyway, it looks like multiple visits out of country and then a K-1 if it heads in that direction. Not how I wanted to do it, I would have preferred for her to visit my home a couple of times to see how we like it.

Thanks again, I will look for agency or something, but I am not holding my breath.

This is something I and other people I know have to deal with constantly when inviting parents, relatives and friends to come for a visit. My experience is with Canada, but the US is not very much different. Actually, Canada is even worse. Don't get upset or take it personally, "your country" did not make that decision, but a consulate worker did, and he or she are simply doing their job. Getting visas is like obtaining credit cards, you need a history to make it easier. Believe me, took me quite a while before I could get my first credit card, same with visas. Travelling to see someone romantically is not helping either, it is usually a red flag for them. If she never traveled outside the country, it is a minus. If she didn't tell them why she is going, they will see through this. Even underaged children left behind do not count as strong ties for first time visa applicants, or so I hear. Just let her build her "travel history" by obtaining a visa to countries where she can get them easily. Or travel to Russia, it's not as scary uncivilized country as it is portrayed everywhere to be. Maybe a little bit  :)

Online andrewfi

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2016, 11:25:38 AM »
On the other hand one can reasonably infer that there's no smoke without fire.

This 'friend' is somebody that you have never met, is, at best, a penfriend and may be much less than you expect or hope for.

Here's my prognostication: you will never meet this person, or the person behind the profile.

"For what else is the life of man but a kind of play in which men in various costumes perform until the director motions them offstage?" -Erasmus

Offline Steveboy

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2016, 12:52:53 PM »
On the other hand one can reasonably infer that there's no smoke without fire.

This 'friend' is somebody that you have never met, is, at best, a penfriend and may be much less than you expect or hope for.

Here's my prognostication: you will never meet this person, or the person behind the profile.

I agree there. Any women who makes the slightest first move or suggestions about visiting the guy first, you may as well forget about.   
As soon as she mentions those first words about visiting you first its 99% Good bye.


Offline Manny

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2016, 02:22:23 PM »
On the other hand one can reasonably infer that there's no smoke without fire.

This 'friend' is somebody that you have never met, is, at best, a penfriend and may be much less than you expect or hope for.

Here's my prognostication: you will never meet this person, or the person behind the profile.

I agree there. Any women who makes the slightest first move or suggestions about visiting the guy first, you may as well forget about.   
As soon as she mentions those first words about visiting you first its 99% Good bye.

Many Americans have this idea that a woman can visit them first. All who think this did not investigate properly enough to know it very seldom happens. I think the OP approached the issue in innocence and with good intent. Now a wheel has fell off he is hoping to find some kind of "agency" who will facilitate this. He won't find such a place.

OP: If you want to meet this woman, get on a plane. There is no other way. If you have insufficient holidays to allow you several trips a year while you build a relationship, then this isnt going to happen for you.

Offline Millaa

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2016, 04:47:56 PM »
Hello, I've only posted in the new members introductions some time ago. I would first like to say thanks for the forum and all the information it has been a good help to me. So, I have a friend from Russia that I have met on a dating site, Russian Cupid I believe. We agreed she would visit but she was denied a visa in Yekaterinburg. I would gladly meet somewhere, and we probably will, but she requested to visit my home. She lives in Omsk, I live in a small town of about 40,000 or so.

Facts:
I am 54 years old and she is 54 as well.
I contacted her and we have been meeting on Skype for about 2 months now.
She has two daughters and two grandchildren.
She has enough savings and an apartment that she owns, and a decent job.
She was refused a tourist visa because they said she lacks sufficient ties to return to Russia. I read the letter and I think it was section 214 or something.

Question, if I understood the letter correctly, denial for this particular reason cannot be appealed? I will not do a K-1 because we have never been together, and I don't think she would either. We are both old enough to know better. Does anyone know or have any ideas how she can get a tourist visa? An agency  of some sort maybe?

Thanks for your time.

Rodger

If she mentioned you in an interview probably she shouldn't try to get a tourist visa anymore. Getting USA B1/B2 is a roulette depending on the consul's mood. I was lucky to get the one and visit my future husband before telling him yes. I didn't like the place, I'm still suffering for the sake of my husband here  :king: My daughter made several attempts to obtain USA visa. She never wanted to stay but it is impossible to prove. She got her first refusal when she asked B1/B2 to come for my wedding because she didn't want to come on K1 petition as my daughter. Next year she got the tourist visa and visited us. But year later she unsuccessfully applied for the student visa, and her B1/B2 was closed because of the change of intentions. For today our result is 2 visits to the United States and 4 visa failures. Maybe she'll try again, maybe not.
As for you, don't try to find any agency who tells they can do visas, nobody can. Visit your woman in Omsk, meet her in the third country. 2 meetings will be enough to apply for K1, which gives her 3 months to decide.
Скептический ум - страшное оружие с собственным счастьем

Offline Danchik

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Re: Friend refused a B-2 visa
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2016, 03:51:13 AM »
Just some thoughts:

1) First of all at 54 she is hardly a scammer. Much more likely she is a lonely woman looking for love. Her chances of finding it in Russia are almost nonexistent. If she is attracting any man in Russia, you can be sure he is a bottom feeder looking for a maid with a paid for apartment.

2) Ideally yes, it's better to visit the woman first. But IMO, it's old school thinking. It's a different playing field now and if the woman wants to visit you in your home country or meet in another country a al Yankee, it shouldn't automatically set off red flags; especially if the woman is over 45.

3) Fashionista is right that a Canadian visa is harder to get than an American visa. Millaa is right that she should never mention she is going to visit a man. Since invitations are no longer required, she should simply say she is going to visit friends to celebrate a wedding anniversary or something along those lines.

No one I have talked to in Moscow has ever been refused an American visa, and I have talked to many. I must say that all of them went through the embassy in Moscow. Maybe it's a little stricter applying in Ekaterinburg.

To the OP, you're right, the fact that she has children, grandchildren, a flat and job usually is more than enough to be approved. One thing I was thinking that might also be a factor for the denial is her age; 54. This is my own theory, but in Russia retirement age for a woman is 55. Again, only a theory, but it might have played a factor.

4) Just because she was refused once doesn't mean she'll be refused the next time, so she should definitely apply again. Good luck.
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