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Author Topic: Homelessness in Russia?  (Read 4883 times)

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Offline Maxx

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2014, 06:41:39 PM »

I agree with you two guys in the principal of property ownership but what I am wondering would something like this happen in the FSU? Or do the elderly get other breaks besides not paying property taxes? Would a 98 year old woman get evicted by capitalist property owners? Or is there enough of the old Soviet Union system left that protects the rights of the proletariat from the bourgeoisie capitalist roaders?

Offline Mikeav8r

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2014, 08:22:21 PM »

I agree with you two guys in the principal of property ownership but what I am wondering would something like this happen in the FSU? Or do the elderly get other breaks besides not paying property taxes? Would a 98 year old woman get evicted by capitalist property owners? Or is there enough of the old Soviet Union system left that protects the rights of the proletariat from the bourgeoisie capitalist roaders?

I just don't see the people themselves doing that to a Baboushka.  They tend to treat their people better over there whereas the greenback carries more weight over here with many.

With that said however, most states laws are geared more towards protecting the tenants than the landlords so it is not as common as one might think over here.  As an example, look at squatters rights....there are some crazy stories about people living in others homes rent free and the owners are powerless to evict.  Some crazy stuff.
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Offline GuppyCaptain

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2014, 08:46:41 PM »
I have to agree in the sense that tenants aren't the only ones that seem to get the short end all the time.  I just lost $3,000.00 because my last tenant decided to skip town without paying rent and left half of her belongings in my house.  I will always do what I can to help out my tenants but when one screws me over, I will go after them to the fullest extent of the law....and you know what the shame of it all is?  I won't see a dime of that lost money.

* - I am not a slumlord either...I was basically forced to rent that house as I only had it for 21 months before I had to move. I wouldn't rent properties by choice to be honest.

Oh the nightmare stories I could share. The simple fact of the matter is that there are bad landlords and there are bad tenants, but proportionately speaking there are FAR more bad tenants than landlords. It's as simple as that.

With regard to the story, I think there's more to it than what the news channel is portraying.


Offline GuppyCaptain

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2014, 09:00:51 PM »

I agree with you two guys in the principal of property ownership but what I am wondering would something like this happen in the FSU? Or do the elderly get other breaks besides not paying property taxes? Would a 98 year old woman get evicted by capitalist property owners? Or is there enough of the old Soviet Union system left that protects the rights of the proletariat from the bourgeoisie capitalist roaders?

You can't evict someone without just cause such as not paying rent, persistent disturbance to the neighborhood, or damaging the apt. It doesn't "sound" like any of that was in play here, so again they can't just evict her.

However, she was either on month to month or a lease (typically a year). If either term ran out, the landlord was well within their right to not renew the lease, therefore she'd have to move.

Now, if it was me and if she had been a good tenant, of course I'd give her as much notice as possible that her 50 year living situation was going to be changing.

As an aside, what's amazing to me is that so many people are still renting when they could own a home (paying off a mortgage) for basically the same payment.

Offline Net_Lenka

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2014, 10:52:33 PM »
It's just seems we are moving to the same "capitalistic" direction - you are on your own with your problems - and all state could do for you is to take off taxes from your pocket I have not idea what people will do when apartments which were build in soviet times wear out completely

Do you think it is the state's duty to house everyone, Helen?

Dont you think that capitalism works OK in the countries that practice it already?
You see I was grew up exactly with the idea that such basic needs like a place to live, health care and education and job places must be the responsibility of the state - it was a basic right wrote in our soviet constitution

I am speaking about MY country where there is "winter" 9 mothes in the year and you can't just sleep in cardboard box at a street Also 74% of our population live in towns in apartments I really have not idea how it all will work in future when a time come to demolish dilapidated houses we got from the USS. Now it's still a head ache of governmet which is obligated to build a new house even for those who had a flat in private property But talks are going here and there that it could not be so any more But with such a gap between salaries and prices for estate 50 % of us would appear at streets. I have not idea how fine it works in other "capitalistic" countries but here - in our conditions - evasion of state from problems with housing in TOWNS would leave just to catastrophe


PS as for problems with getting rent from  the tenants in a case with private estate then in reality it's all a problem of lanlords They of course could  file a claim in court (if they signed an agreement with tenants and paid taxes themselves to begin with) but actualyy that problem is sold in majority cases with just getting rent ahead But again in Russia renting some private state means in 90% that "tenats" do have place to live somewhere  else ( in other city- tiny one-bad one-  but they  do have it) So I didn't know cases when the tenants were thrown on street and had not place where to live
The stories when one  killed somebody who shared rights on the same flat in order to get " the space" are more common though  :-\
- А Вы кто такой будете?
-Тьфу на Вас
-А фамилия Ваша как?  -Тьфу на Вас еще раз .. а фамилия моя слишком известная, чтобы я её называл

Offline Annushka

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2014, 06:07:51 AM »

Thank you Net_Lenka and Annushka for the information and links. I've always been curious how the system works there in comparison to the one here. I am of the belief that American ways are not always the best ways. It seems like the American poor are being taken for every dollar they have. When a person goes into a care center for their old age they take everything and only allow the resident to keep $45 a month for personal expenses. Only the wealthy are allowed to pass on their life time savings to their children. There are some tricks they could use while they are still relatively young but few know about this. So when they get old the system strips them of everything.

http://crooksandliars.com/2014/07/calif-landlord-evicts-98-year-old-woman
Calif. Landlord Evicts 98-year-old Woman Who Paid Rent On Time For 50 Years

Quote
A 98-year-old San Francisco woman said this week that she is being evicted from her apartment after 50 years, and she's never once been late paying her rent.

KRON reported that Urban Green Investments is using the 1986 Ellis Act to kick Mary Phillips out of her apartment so the company can cash in on the surging real estate market in San Francisco. The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict tenants if they are getting out of the rental business.

“I’ve been very happy here,” Phillips explained. “I’ve always paid my rent, I’ve never been late.”

Phillips, who is one of many the low-income families and seniors being evicted, has vowed to fight the eviction because she has nowhere else to go.

“I didn’t sit down and cry, I just refused to believe it,” she said. “They’re going to have to take me out of here feet first.”

“Just because of your age, don’t let people push you around,” she said.


Maxx, this very old grandmother, born in 1916. May God grant her good health!
In Russia, the most socially protected - the elderly. 80-year old senior citizen put supplementary pension and payment for the care.
This means that old age older people meet:
1. At home, in the circle of family favorite.
2. Lonely elderly receive constant care from Social Security and a stranger. If staying at home.
3. And as there are nursing homes, to live together alone. They can be both public and private.