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Author Topic: Homelessness in Russia?  (Read 4640 times)

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Offline sashathecat

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2014, 03:56:05 PM »
Also if you can not come up with the taxes how long will it take before the government throws you out into the street?

Do I read that right? Your government can evict you from your own home for not paying property taxes?

In the US they can put a lien on your home if you do not pay property taxes. They will take these funds (plus fees and interest) when you sell your home. If the amount accumulates to a certain extent or fines such as disrepair or code enforcement accumulate very high they can take your home. Or an investor can buy the lien and foreclose on your home taking it from under you.

In some States they can use eminent domain to seize your home for the better of the "community". This has been abused by those with money and connections. Here in Florida it is harder as we have laws protecting our homes moreso than in other States (Homestead Exemption, etc). In my wife's neighborhood in Ukraine there is a fight going on as they want to put a railway through the neighborhood. I imagine many countries have variations on the eminent domain laws.

The IRS can seize your home if you owe substantial back taxes but this is very rare.

In the US you don't ever actually own property the way the system is setup. You only lease it from banks or the almighty government.

Offline Larry

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2014, 04:10:22 PM »
Also if you can not come up with the taxes how long will it take before the government throws you out into the street?

Do I read that right? Your government can evict you from your own home for not paying property taxes?

In the US they can put a lien on your home if you do not pay property taxes. They will take these funds (plus fees and interest) when you sell your home. If the amount accumulates to a certain extent or fines such as disrepair or code enforcement accumulate very high they can take your home. Or an investor can buy the lien and foreclose on your home taking it from under you.

In some places I've worked there are annual "tax sales", auctions of real estate for which property taxes have not been paid. 

Property taxes are senior to almost all other creditors' claims, even those of financial institutions who have lent the borrower the money to purchase the property. If a bank lends you $200,000 to buy a house, and records its security interest in the house in the local office where such things are recorded, and the $3,000 in property taxes are not paid, then the local government can auction the house off to pay off the taxes.  To forestall this possibility lenders typically insist that the borrower pay the property taxes directly to them, and they in turn pay the taxes to the local government.


Offline Manny

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #17 on: July 15, 2014, 04:16:40 PM »
Also if you can not come up with the taxes how long will it take before the government throws you out into the street?

Do I read that right? Your government can evict you from your own home for not paying property taxes?

In the US they can put a lien on your home if you do not pay property taxes. They will take these funds (plus fees and interest) when you sell your home.

Same here. But that is an extreme measure after lots of court stuff over years.

If the amount accumulates to a certain extent or fines such as disrepair or code enforcement accumulate very high they can take your home.

I never heard of that here. It can probably theoretically happen, but is unlikely.

Or an investor can buy the lien and foreclose on your home taking it from under you.

That doesn't happen here. Not unless the lender seizes it and puts it in auction. But that takes ages of non payment of a mortgage. Not with local taxes.

In some States they can use eminent domain to seize your home for the better of the "community".

Only if you lived there 40 years and its falling around you and your 25 cats ears for all that time. And maybe you are senile or something. But generally not.

In my wife's neighborhood in Ukraine there is a fight going on as they want to put a railway through the neighborhood.

Compulsory purchase can happen for public projects. It happens, but the odds are miniscule.

The IRS can seize your home if you owe substantial back taxes but this is very rare.

Theoretically possible, but again unheard of.

In the US you don't ever actually own property the way the system is setup. You only lease it from banks or the almighty government.

Here we have leasehold (where someone owns the land the house stands on) or freehold (where you own it). But you can normally buy the freehold quite cheap; recently put into law. We bought ours last year for about $700. Although the "rent" is only something like $50 a year (I have one old property where its like $2 a year), it makes sales simpler, cuts bureaucracy and makes improvement permissions easier in the future. Its mostly a hangover from Victorian landowner days.
please tell me where I'm being / have been 'dishonest'? 
Yes, he said that.........


Offline sashathecat

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2014, 04:28:06 PM »
Here we have leasehold (where someone owns the land the house stands on) or freehold (where you own it). But you can normally buy the freehold quite cheap; recently put into law. We bought ours last year for about $700. Although the "rent" is only something like $50 a year, it makes sales simpler, cuts bureaucracy and makes improvement permissions easier in the future. Its mostly a hangover from Victorian landowner days.

In a few States it is the same with both leasehold and fee simple (same as your freehold). Hawaii is an example where the lands are "owned" by the natives. The leases are setup for either 20 or 99 years and you must renew the lease at expiration. They are trying to phase out the leasehold to stimulate the market.

Mexico is leasehold as well. My aunt owns what must be a several million dollar home but leases the land it sits on.

Offline Ladine

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2014, 04:53:53 PM »
sashathecat recently passed a law prohibiting at a people to take property for the loan. This can only be done in the case ? If you take a loan secured by real estate. and now it is not practiced. people are smart . Property tax , we have a but if you over 120-150 m. m And this is a site for the oligarch. Apartments in our small towns fell strongly in price. and win the one who buys a house or apartment now . In rural areas, there is even an empty house.  local authority can provide you with real estate if you intend to engage in private enterprise in agriculture

banking structure still a mess. Banks and yet still try to arrange moral blackmail for petty evasion during the loan. But their threat is no longer working  :chuckle: :)


smart will learn - a fool would teach.
Никогда не оправдывайся, если ты невиновен. Если в вас бросают грязью, к вам может и не долететь. А руки того, кто это делает, останутся в грязи. Люблю вас всех.

Offline Ladine

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2014, 05:01:21 PM »
Where do the homeless people sleep anyways?

Here is a link to a photographer who documents the homeless children living in Ukraine.

http://davidgillanders.photoshelter.com/gallery/street-children-of-ukraine/G0000unRJjlJjGrQ/

Adults will sleep under bridges or in parks. The life expectancy of a homeless person is the FSU is much lower than in a warm and sunny place here in the US I would imagine.

about children.

Children are really exist in the sewers . but it is not the fact that children do not have housing.
 It's not really orphans . children and disadvantaged families. Where parents are alcoholics and do not pay enough attention to children . In orphanages as often occur misconduct violations . and children because of their hormonal maturation and full of aggression and disagreement often go to live in a free zone . All because in orphanages children are treated as ordinary beings , who was thrown . that the child did not get used . They just give the room for housing, food, clothing . But none of the staff are not allowed to press to her and regret. because they're all equal . children grow up so full of indifference where and how they will subside . The main thing in their lives - their own pleasure.
smart will learn - a fool would teach.
Никогда не оправдывайся, если ты невиновен. Если в вас бросают грязью, к вам может и не долететь. А руки того, кто это делает, останутся в грязи. Люблю вас всех.

Offline sashathecat

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2014, 05:17:59 PM »
Where do the homeless people sleep anyways?

Here is a link to a photographer who documents the homeless children living in Ukraine.

http://davidgillanders.photoshelter.com/gallery/street-children-of-ukraine/G0000unRJjlJjGrQ/

Adults will sleep under bridges or in parks. The life expectancy of a homeless person is the FSU is much lower than in a warm and sunny place here in the US I would imagine.

about children.

Children are really exist in the sewers . but it is not the fact that children do not have housing.
 It's not really orphans . children and disadvantaged families. Where parents are alcoholics and do not pay enough attention to children . In orphanages as often occur misconduct violations . and children because of their hormonal maturation and full of aggression and disagreement often go to live in a free zone . All because in orphanages children are treated as ordinary beings , who was thrown . that the child did not get used . They just give the room for housing, food, clothing . But none of the staff are not allowed to press to her and regret. because they're all equal . children grow up so full of indifference where and how they will subside . The main thing in their lives - their own pleasure.

Yes, from what I understand this is true. The word orphan is many times used quite differently in the US and Eastern Europe. We have been doing some work on a project in this area and it is not such a simple problem. Many of the orphans still have one or both parents around, but who are incapacitated by drugs or alcohol. The kids prefer to live in groups in the streets with each other rather than in communal housing as you mention. Drug use is tied to the children's desire to live outside the confines of a shelter.

Offline Ladine

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2014, 05:24:26 PM »
Where do the homeless people sleep anyways?

Here is a link to a photographer who documents the homeless children living in Ukraine.

http://davidgillanders.photoshelter.com/gallery/street-children-of-ukraine/G0000unRJjlJjGrQ/

Adults will sleep under bridges or in parks. The life expectancy of a homeless person is the FSU is much lower than in a warm and sunny place here in the US I would imagine.

about children.

Children are really exist in the sewers . but it is not the fact that children do not have housing.
 It's not really orphans . children and disadvantaged families. Where parents are alcoholics and do not pay enough attention to children . In orphanages as often occur misconduct violations . and children because of their hormonal maturation and full of aggression and disagreement often go to live in a free zone . All because in orphanages children are treated as ordinary beings , who was thrown . that the child did not get used . They just give the room for housing, food, clothing . But none of the staff are not allowed to press to her and regret. because they're all equal . children grow up so full of indifference where and how they will subside . The main thing in their lives - their own pleasure.

Yes, from what I understand this is true. The word orphan is many times used quite differently in the US and Eastern Europe. We have been doing some work on a project in this area and it is not such a simple problem. Many of the orphans still have one or both parents around, but who are incapacitated by drugs or alcohol. The kids prefer to live in groups in the streets with each other rather than in communal housing as you mention. Drug use is tied to the children's desire to live outside the confines of a shelter.

 just at our have 23 years of life completely disrupted the country. and now that time is needed to create it all over again. But recently took one child 5 months my mother 15 years. just because a minor child engaged guy (Brother mother and the child was neglected very much.'s another orphan)

I no longer understand what I write. I hope your understand?

 мозги уже на прочь отказываются от иностранных языков .
smart will learn - a fool would teach.
Никогда не оправдывайся, если ты невиновен. Если в вас бросают грязью, к вам может и не долететь. А руки того, кто это делает, останутся в грязи. Люблю вас всех.

Offline Annushka

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2014, 02:27:44 AM »

Homelessness in Russia. I have an understanding that most everyone in Russia and Ukraine is assigned a home that they own 100%. A provision from the old Soviet Union days. I understand there are renters but as a percentage how many? In America about one third of "homeowners" own their home without debt. The other 2 thirds pay a mortgage (loan) to a bank and usually for 30 years. Are there mortgages there? If so what is the usual conditions of this loan?

Also in regard to property taxes. Here in America as a general rule about 1% of the value of the home is to be paid to the government in taxes. The average price of a house with it's land in America is about $250,000. Of course some places are far higher (Manhattan) and far lower (rural Mississippi). So if an average priced home of say 250K the yearly taxes would be about $2,500. What could you expect in Russia and Ukraine?

Also if you can not come up with the taxes how long will it take before the government throws you out into the street? Where do the homeless people sleep anyways?

While I am asking questions. Is turkey available there? And to those Russian and Ukrainian women who have tasted turkey do you like it?





Maxx, I have a friend in Twitter from Australia. His family first wave of immigrants from Russia. Although he was a professor of economics in Japan, now in Australia universities. Alex wants to return to his family home - in Russia. He was interested in my story about Siberia. And requested advice on the acquisition of real estate in Russia for a foreigner. Assessment of his home in Australia also: order 250000$.

Please, links:

Foreigners in Russia: how to buy real estate?

http://ipro-blog.ru/?p=541

The cost of housing in Russia varies depending on the region.

Property tax for seniors.

http://mamadu.ru/statya/nalog-na-imushestvo-dlia-pensionerov.htm

Savings Bank of Russia. All of the mortgage.

http://www.sberbank.ru/moscow/ru/person/credits/home/mot/

As a rule, Russian homeless are illegals and guest workers. For people in difficult life situations are institutions of social care for the homeless Social Protection Committee.

PS This pompous Diet chicken nicknamed turkey lives, multiplies and is commercially available in Russia. Certainly, we will be eaten. :)

Offline Net_Lenka

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2014, 05:56:11 AM »

Homelessness in Russia. I have an understanding that most everyone in Russia and Ukraine is assigned a home that they own 100%. A provision from the old Soviet Union days. I understand there are renters but as a percentage how many? In America about one third of "homeowners" own their home without debt. The other 2 thirds pay a mortgage (loan) to a bank and usually for 30 years. Are there mortgages there? If so what is the usual conditions of this loan?

Also in regard to property taxes. Here in America as a general rule about 1% of the value of the home is to be paid to the government in taxes. The average price of a house with it's land in America is about $250,000. Of course some places are far higher (Manhattan) and far lower (rural Mississippi). So if an average priced home of say 250K the yearly taxes would be about $2,500. What could you expect in Russia and Ukraine?

Also if you can not come up with the taxes how long will it take before the government throws you out into the street? Where do the homeless people sleep anyways?

While I am asking questions. Is turkey available there? And to those Russian and Ukrainian women who have tasted turkey do you like it?

As it's not such many years passeds after the fall of the USSR then yes almost everybody do have a roof above a head yet ( bad or good one but there is  a place where to live anyway.  (I speak about average people but not about "antisocial elements" who sold their flats for a botle of vodka or about  those unfortunate people who lost there property due to some frauds with estate)


  I could be wrong with statistic   but I recall it was about 80% of privatizared "soviet" flats and the right to privatizate a flat gotten before 1991 is prolonged till 2015. Privatizated flat means you have no debts, and taxes are counted from "official" price wich is more than 10 times lower than what you could get at a "market" if you decide to sell your flat . The last bill with taxes  we got for our three rooms Moscow flat was about 1500 RUB (for a year) For comaprison we paid 1200 rub tax for the car at the same time.
With such amounts it's indeed hard to get in troubles because of not paying taxes. But the talks is going to change the rules for we would pay much more .... well we will see .. till now we could only thank former Soviet Union for our flat .

Paiment for communal servises ( gaz-water-electricy and e.ts)  is another case With "average' amount about 3000 rub per month it easely to get into situation when some day you face  a huge debt if you  didn't pay your bills. ( for some reasone - like losing job or not having movey to pay bills because of paying bill for somehealth care) But our state is still too human in such cases - nobody could be thrown on street even in this cases  I recall only few "show-off" cases when families were punished whith moving to tiny social rooms because they didn't pay communal bills for years.

 And it's different situation if you deal with debt to bank for your flat - here there would be no mercy in a case you could not pay mortage -- bank would get your flat and it 's your problem where to live

I can't provide 100% correct numbers for mortage as "it's all depends" but one for sure it's VERY expensive game. First paiment various from 10% till 50% of the whole price and % for mortage goes from 8-10% (some special state progamms - like programm for "young family" or for teachers"   till 18(20)%.  Average cost for Moscow estate - 4000$ per 1m2 , average salary in MOsocw about 1500$ And if  it's possible to belive statistics 13% of Russians got credit  mortage in 2013

It's above me to get who are those people who are too "optimistic"  to deal with mortage  To my mind  the real way for new generation to get a place to live is a rent - ( or waiting till some grand mother with soviet flat die to sell out her flat and only then get a mortage)
- А Вы кто такой будете?
-Тьфу на Вас
-А фамилия Ваша как?  -Тьфу на Вас еще раз .. а фамилия моя слишком известная, чтобы я её называл

Offline Maxx

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2014, 12:37:44 PM »

Thank you Net_Lenka and Annushka for the information and links. I've always been curious how the system works there in comparison to the one here. I am of the belief that American ways are not always the best ways. It seems like the American poor are being taken for every dollar they have. When a person goes into a care center for their old age they take everything and only allow the resident to keep $45 a month for personal expenses. Only the wealthy are allowed to pass on their life time savings to their children. There are some tricks they could use while they are still relatively young but few know about this. So when they get old the system strips them of everything.

http://crooksandliars.com/2014/07/calif-landlord-evicts-98-year-old-woman
Calif. Landlord Evicts 98-year-old Woman Who Paid Rent On Time For 50 Years

Quote
A 98-year-old San Francisco woman said this week that she is being evicted from her apartment after 50 years, and she's never once been late paying her rent.

KRON reported that Urban Green Investments is using the 1986 Ellis Act to kick Mary Phillips out of her apartment so the company can cash in on the surging real estate market in San Francisco. The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict tenants if they are getting out of the rental business.

“I’ve been very happy here,” Phillips explained. “I’ve always paid my rent, I’ve never been late.”

Phillips, who is one of many the low-income families and seniors being evicted, has vowed to fight the eviction because she has nowhere else to go.

“I didn’t sit down and cry, I just refused to believe it,” she said. “They’re going to have to take me out of here feet first.”

“Just because of your age, don’t let people push you around,” she said.

Offline Net_Lenka

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2014, 01:45:10 PM »
It's just seems we are moving to the same "capitalistic" derection - you are on your own with your problems - and all state could do for you is to take off taxes from your pocket I have not idea what peopel will do when appartments which were build in soviet times wear out complitely
- А Вы кто такой будете?
-Тьфу на Вас
-А фамилия Ваша как?  -Тьфу на Вас еще раз .. а фамилия моя слишком известная, чтобы я её называл

Offline Manny

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2014, 02:27:18 PM »
It's just seems we are moving to the same "capitalistic" derection - you are on your own with your problems - and all state could do for you is to take off taxes from your pocket I have not idea what peopel will do when appartments which were build in soviet times wear out complitely

Do you think it is the state's duty to house everyone, Helen?

Dont you think that capitalism works OK in the countries that practice it already?
please tell me where I'm being / have been 'dishonest'? 
Yes, he said that.........

Offline GuppyCaptain

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2014, 04:14:48 PM »

Thank you Net_Lenka and Annushka for the information and links. I've always been curious how the system works there in comparison to the one here. I am of the belief that American ways are not always the best ways. It seems like the American poor are being taken for every dollar they have. When a person goes into a care center for their old age they take everything and only allow the resident to keep $45 a month for personal expenses. Only the wealthy are allowed to pass on their life time savings to their children. There are some tricks they could use while they are still relatively young but few know about this. So when they get old the system strips them of everything.

http://crooksandliars.com/2014/07/calif-landlord-evicts-98-year-old-woman
Calif. Landlord Evicts 98-year-old Woman Who Paid Rent On Time For 50 Years

Quote
A 98-year-old San Francisco woman said this week that she is being evicted from her apartment after 50 years, and she's never once been late paying her rent.

KRON reported that Urban Green Investments is using the 1986 Ellis Act to kick Mary Phillips out of her apartment so the company can cash in on the surging real estate market in San Francisco. The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict tenants if they are getting out of the rental business.

“I’ve been very happy here,” Phillips explained. “I’ve always paid my rent, I’ve never been late.”

Phillips, who is one of many the low-income families and seniors being evicted, has vowed to fight the eviction because she has nowhere else to go.

“I didn’t sit down and cry, I just refused to believe it,” she said. “They’re going to have to take me out of here feet first.”

“Just because of your age, don’t let people push you around,” she said.

Really? You're kidding, right? I'm a landlord myself. A responsible one at that and not a slumlord. While it's certainly sad that the old lady wants to stay there, if her lease is not being renewed or she's on month-to-month rent, then the leasing company/landlord is not doing anything wrong.

I treat my tenants like they treat me. If they're good to me then I'm the same to them. If they try to screw me over, then they quickly come to realize that they tried to walk over the wrong person.

If I was selling a rental property, I'd try to help those tenants that were good tenants, but something like this certainly wouldn't stop me from selling the place. A tenant should never assume when they move into a place that it's permanent. If they wanted permanency then owning a home would be in order.

Personally, this "story" sounds more like a news channel that's looking for a story and what better story than "big business evicts poor old lady". There's more to this than what's being written.

Offline Mikeav8r

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Re: Homelessness in Russia?
« Reply #29 on: July 16, 2014, 05:44:12 PM »
I have to agree in the sense that tenants aren't the only ones that seem to get the short end all the time.  I just lost $3,000.00 because my last tenant decided to skip town without paying rent and left half of her belongings in my house.  I will always do what I can to help out my tenants but when one screws me over, I will go after them to the fullest extent of the law....and you know what the shame of it all is?  I won't see a dime of that lost money.

* - I am not a slumlord either...I was basically forced to rent that house as I only had it for 21 months before I had to move. I wouldn't rent properties by choice to be honest.
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2.  If you want to give God a good laugh, tell him your plans. - Anon


 

 

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