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Author Topic: Go to wife or work dilema ?  (Read 8145 times)

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Offline Art

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2014, 10:33:18 AM »
You need to earn at least 125% of the poverty level for your family size and the state where you live.
You need to have evidence of the relationship between you and your wife. You should have a bank account together, add her name to your utilities, file joint income tax returns, have records of telephone calls to each other, photographs together, etc. Keep airplane boarding passes, receipts from hotels, etc.

So I take it that your wife has no children, but she wants them?

Offline 2tallbill

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2014, 11:49:32 AM »
I am 35 years old and no where near retirement.

I am applying for a CR-1 Visa.


I think my previous advice is still good, however you might try to see if
you could wrangle a few extra vacation days by working weekends or taking
on additional work, so that you can fly over, see her and give her a little TLC

I completely understand what you are going through. The hardest thing in the
world was putting my fiancee' on a plane sending her back home.

Udachi!

Bill

FSUW are not for entry level daters. FSUW don't do vague FSUW like a man of action so be a man of action  If you find a promising girl, get your butt on a plane. There are a hundred ways to be successful and a thousand ways to f#ck it up
Kiss the girl, don't ask her first.
Get an apartment not a hotel. DON'T recycle girls

Offline AJ

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 12:30:50 PM »
If your plan ,as stated, was to marry, file for a spousal visa and bring her to your country ,as well as continue to work at your current job-
 Then really what has changed? nothing other than the normal separation anxiety any long distance couple would endure prior to relocation .

  Whether you completely relocated to Ukraine , or she relocates here, there is still a matter of time involved.
It may be a little less time for you to rearrange your life to relocate, but its not likely much different than the visa processing times for her to come here.
 The relatively shorter time period for you to go there, would be completely overshadowed by your earning ability.(even within those few months)

Quote
I know family comes first then Job.

Family first certainly  includes making fundamentally good  decisions on where to live and your job opportunities to support the family?
Off hand right now from what you've shared so far,
sticking with your original plan seems best for the family.
 A few months of separation is nothing in the bigger picture.

I've lived  as an expat,I did not find it all that challenging and enjoyed it.
That said,  I would not do so in Ukraine now, just seems a poor choice considering the other options available.

 In your case I'd go to USCIS website and look up the processing times for family based visa's,.They have tables showing  the averages based on recent months filed back a bit, to be able to give you a good estimate.

https://egov.uscis.gov/cris/processTimesDisplayInit.do;jsessionid=bacsoveB0s2FDcaOwu4Bu

Also I'd advise you go to the visa journey forum /website and you should find a lot of useful information and guidelines on the filing itself, as well as couples currently awaiting visa approval and their timelines for reference.I think it  would be a valuable resource for you.
http://www.visajourney.com/


In the meantime ,with limited vacation time, just reassure your wife all is normal, all is well, the process is in place and going according to your plan as a familytogether?
That a few months separation is indeed the normal part on marrying any foreigner, even if you were to relocate there
(you'd have to get your own affairs in order?) etc.
If you can manage get off work, even unpaid leave if that's not an issue,
then do so, go visit, or meet in a third country for a vacation together.

Heya Danchik-
 Yeap!!  I have filed both DCF for spouse, quite awhile ago though,
and a K1 fiance visa in my past and could give him a bit of insight into the process itself. However, regarding the newer laws and regulations,
 I'm sure someone here has more recent experience than mine, or I hope so :)
My filing for K1 was in April 2011, and it processed and she had her interview in Kiev ,and approval ,all in about 4 months!!
 She arrived here in mid July 2011..and we were married October 7th 2011.

I am unsure if it is currently that fast,as it seemed odd(and his filing would be a bit different since it's a spouse)
 but in our case it really was a very short processing time frame. Certainly not worthy any frustration on such life changing decisions.
In fact it processed faster than either of us were ready for.. which was fine!! but we were quite prepared for it to take  longer and had various visits planned.

Of course each individual case is different,
but it should be easy to  look up the current averages and timelines for his petition for a spouse /family visa so he can have a good idea of how long it would take for it to process.
At least then he would have some information of how long that wait is, before making some snap decision.

As you know, the one key thing they both are likely to need in this journey, is patience.
If he relocated there, that certainly would not change.
 :chuckle:
she had a hip with bad habits , and a shake that was a bit obscene


Offline bagalia

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2014, 10:27:12 PM »
You need to earn at least 125% of the poverty level for your family size and the state where you live.
You need to have evidence of the relationship between you and your wife. You should have a bank account together, add her name to your utilities, file joint income tax returns, have records of telephone calls to each other, photographs together, etc. Keep airplane boarding passes, receipts from hotels, etc.

So I take it that your wife has no children, but she wants them?

Do not forget the most important part. You must have 'the last three years' of qualifying taxes (the 125% is roughly $20,000 a year for two) which kind of puts a stop to long term vacation thoughts. That or you need a huge amount of assets. Not two years followed by vacation or three different jobs in three years.

I have nothing against people who fall into Luv and do not think ahead but once they understand that there is a lot more to this than just getting married they must buckle down and look at the entire process over the next few years to come because the government doesn't care about your personal problems and you can end up in an impossible and failed relationship.

I planned most every aspect of my relationship including the need to return to work for 3 years before getting married. Perhaps I am overly cautious but it worked for me. Many men get married and do not even realize that they do not qualify as a sponsor as they have no stable income or work history.

To the OP, review the paperwork and supporting evidence carefully but especially, understand the affidavit of support and be able to fill in every line perfectly as they want it. Keep your day job for the next couple of years. There will be further tests. Your future plans depend more on the future paperwork rather than what you may wish to happen.
Misery is the river of the world; everybody row, everybody row.

Offline Art

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #34 on: July 03, 2014, 02:13:19 PM »
The CR-1 is processed differently than a K-1.

When the CR-1 petition is sent to NVC, they have a step-by-step process that you must follow.

Your wife can chose you to help her through the process, or an attorney or to do it all by herself. She needs to mail in the signed and dated form.

You will send in a payment to a certain address. Note, each step has a different address for NVC.
Next step after they receive the payment, you fill out the I-864 support form with all the additional documents and mail it in.
When NVC approves that, they start on your wife's documents.

The steps are not the same for everyone, depending upon your circumstances.

When NVC has approved all your papers, they send the file to the embassy and schedule the interview.

The police reports and certain other documents must be orginals.

For some countries, if your spouse decides to do all the paper work itself, NVC will accept scanned and emailed copies of documents. This would save you time and money. If your wife has excellent English ability, this might be a good option for you. Again, the FIRST step is the decision about this!

Once you send in the I-864 form, you are no longer considered the petitioner.

Offline marriedguy

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2014, 06:57:35 PM »
My average income for the 3 years is more than enough for me to qualify as a sponsor. Even though i did not work much last year.

Why should i keep the job for the next couple of years, when a CR1 takes less than a year to process.


Offline lonedrake

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #36 on: July 04, 2014, 08:53:12 PM »
 
Quote
Why should i keep the job for the next couple of years, when a CR1 takes less than a year to process.

Just make sure you make enough to qualify in 2015. The CR-1 process may average less than a year....but no guarantees. Many have taken 15 months or more.

Our cr-1 was at 9 months last week. It could still be 2-6 months more. We just don't know. There was a huge backlog at USCIS last year and now the backlog is at NVC.

Offline bagalia

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #37 on: July 04, 2014, 09:14:25 PM »
My average income for the 3 years is more than enough for me to qualify as a sponsor. Even though i did not work much last year.

Why should i keep the job for the next couple of years, when a CR1 takes less than a year to process.

CR-1 is not my specialty but it is not so much different from the K-1 AOS as I see it. Both require the I-864 and an interview. Both end with conditional permanent resident status.

The 864 shows how stable you are financially. It is a good thing that you have 3 years of tax receipts that qualify. If you were to quit your job and go live in her country now, how would you answer the question of where you are currently employed?

I am also not a wiz on CR-1 approval times but believe it is between 6 months and a year. There are always miracles and there are tragedies so you might even say 3 to 18 months.

Once she is approved you will have, I believe, 6 months for her to enter the country or you begin all over again. She will most likely wish to enter as soon as possible.

So IF you quit your job soon and IF you were to get past not having a current job at the interview, you would need travel and living expenses for the next year (lowball $10,000) plus travel, setup and living expenses for you both to your new home after she gets her approval. Unless you have a tidy sum saved up or plan to live with your parents you will need a new job. Maybe the job market will be better by then or maybe it will be worse.

Once she gets to your country (next year 2015) she will be given a 2 year conditional residency and you will apply to have conditions removed at the end of that time. During those two years she will not be leaving your country for any long period of time if I am correct.

And so my comment on not leaving your day job anytime soon. If I am wrong then I am sure that somebody will correct me.

I hope all goes well whatever the case. Go sign up at visa journey and you will get all the information you need and many more answers to any questions related to all visas. I would imagine you have already done so?
Misery is the river of the world; everybody row, everybody row.

Offline tfcrew

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #38 on: July 05, 2014, 09:52:24 AM »
I married my wife in Russia.  It only took 8 months to process all of the paper work and get her visa.  I doubt if it can happen much faster.

Yeah, too late for the K-1 (which is the fastest method..albeit very slow for half the country ATM).  He will have to do the K-3/I-130 (I think they are renaming it) which will take a good year at best.

 

An I-130 is also a visa application....

Quote
If you are a U.S. citizen wishing to sponsor your foreign-born husband or wife for a U.S. green card (lawful permanent residence), you will need to start the application process by filing a visa petition on Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative).

http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/free-books/fiance-marriage-visa-book/chapter7-8.html

Offline tfcrew

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #39 on: July 05, 2014, 10:05:07 AM »
OK a spousal visa.

Quote
Spousal visas take 12 to 16 months.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120424094056AAGUtEu

My wife's son immigrated to the USA to work. He is an analyst for Cisco Systems.
I would advise to keep job...visit ASAP and..be patient....both of you.
All of us marrieds here have gone through 'the wait' :snivel:

Offline 2tallbill

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #40 on: July 05, 2014, 11:16:03 AM »
My average income for the 3 years is more than enough for me to qualify as a sponsor. Even though i did not work much last year.

Why should i keep the job for the next couple of years, when a CR1 takes less than a year to process.

Grasshopper, you are at the beginning of a long relationship with a cumbersome,
inefficient, government agency who employ only the bureaucratic simpletons named  the USCIS. They have a plethora of rules, regulations and hurdles that you must
navigate over the next decade. The half wits at USCIS can greatly complicate your
life and your relationship with your new blushing bride.

The USCIS website is here http://www.uscis.gov/ and I strongly advise you to spend
a few hundred hours here http://www.visajourney.com/
NOTE: there is a Russian specific are of the site http://www.visajourney.com/forums/forum/98-russia-ukraine-and-belarus/


Encourage your wife to read it. She will start figuring things out. Lucky for you
she has a lifetime of experience dealing with a myriad of bureaucratic institutions 
with ridiculous rules etc. Once she digs into the visa journey site you will notice
that you are married to an i dotter and t crosser that can easily navigate the
seemingly capricious and arbitrary institution called USCIS.

FSUW are not for entry level daters. FSUW don't do vague FSUW like a man of action so be a man of action  If you find a promising girl, get your butt on a plane. There are a hundred ways to be successful and a thousand ways to f#ck it up
Kiss the girl, don't ask her first.
Get an apartment not a hotel. DON'T recycle girls

Online yankee

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #41 on: July 05, 2014, 12:47:56 PM »
I strongly recommend getting an immigration lawyer.  The cost was worth it for my wife and me.  Without the lawyer it would have taken several more months.
What is worse than not being able to get what you don't even want?

Offline marriedguy

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2014, 06:22:06 AM »
how much does a immigration lawyer cost ?

I strongly recommend getting an immigration lawyer.  The cost was worth it for my wife and me.  Without the lawyer it would have taken several more months.

Offline marriedguy

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #43 on: July 06, 2014, 06:25:35 AM »
I will be visiting her soon, it's only 3 weeks since we got married, already it is getting hard being away  :snivel:


OK a spousal visa.

Quote
Spousal visas take 12 to 16 months.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120424094056AAGUtEu

My wife's son immigrated to the USA to work. He is an analyst for Cisco Systems.
I would advise to keep job...visit ASAP and..be patient....both of you.
All of us marrieds here have gone through 'the wait' :snivel:

Offline marriedguy

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Re: Go to wife or work dilema ?
« Reply #44 on: July 06, 2014, 06:27:27 AM »
How can I prove ongoing relationship.

I wanted to open a joint bank account in Ukraine but could not find a bank which has it.

How did you guys prove a ongoing relationship.

How can i show intermingling of finances ? When there is no joint bank account concept in Ukraine.


 

 

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