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Author Topic: Recipes: Breads-Desserts-Torts-Compotes-Blini-Pies-etc  (Read 18866 times)

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Offline Olga

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Recipes: Breads-Desserts-Torts-Compotes-Blini-Pies-etc
« on: November 16, 2007, 08:37:17 PM »
  That fruit compote you mentioned is delicious, huh!  Perhaps Olga or one of the ladies can give you a recipe. 

Cherry and red currant compote

400gm of cherry, 200 gm of  red currant (also you can make it without red currant)

Take the fruit stems off  from cherry and red currant
Wash cherry and red currant
Lay the cherry and red currant in glass jags layer-by-layer
fill glass jags up with the boiling sugar syrup (600 gm of sugar and 400 ml of water = 1 litre of syrup)
Cover jags with metal lids for preserving.
Pasteurize the jags at temperature 90C (194F I guess) - 0.5 litre capacity glass jag during 8 minutes and 1 litre capacity glass jag during 12 minutes.


Peach compote

Peel peaches,  divide in half and take clingstones off. Put peaches in glass jag (cut sides downward bottom of the jag). Fill glass jag up with the boiling sugar syrup  right away (syrup: 400 gm of sugar and 1 litre of water)
Cover the jag with metal lids for preserving. Sterilize the jag during 20 minutes.

Online bgreed

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2007, 05:59:11 AM »
Olga, Thanks for the recipe you are a wealth of information to this board.  Now all I have to do is to find fresh currants in season  :)

Offline mendeleyev

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2007, 11:16:11 AM »
Olga, thanks for sharing this recipe on line!  Gregg, let me know where you find those berries.  I'm not sure if they have them in my state of Arizona.  But I'm going to try.


Offline DonA

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2007, 02:53:24 PM »
Olga, thanks for sharing this recipe on line!  Gregg, let me know where you find those berries .  I'm not sure if they have them in my state of Arizona.  But I'm going to try.

Mendy, we have looked all over Arizona for it. We contacted a local wholesaler and he told me they do not carry them. The only place i know to get them is in San Fransisco but they will not ship small orders. So as my Uncle Scotty used to say..we are ship-sacky ( meaning SOL  :( ). What we did bring back from SF Yulia made in to some very nice jam.

Hey any of you guys in SF wanna make a few of us guys happy and ship us some currants?   :)

DonAz

Online bgreed

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2007, 03:34:13 PM »
I wonder if you could use dried currants and get a similar result??

Offline Olga

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2007, 03:51:33 PM »
I wonder if you could use dried currants and get a similar result??

No, there is the other compote recipes  for dry berries and fruits. 

Offline DonA

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Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2007, 03:52:15 PM »
I wonder if you could use dried currants and get a similar result??

I don't know. I'll have to ask my old lady  :)

DonAz

Offline Robert34

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Re: Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2008, 08:21:15 PM »
G'day all,

              Being a chef I have to put my 2 bob in here, As I undertand a compote can either be served as a meal or a drink.
              Fresh fruits more so I use for my dishes and presentations because of the natural flavours and sugar content.
              Dried fruits are "normally" used in drinks although I have used  some glace fruits in some puddings as a compote,
              With a sherry and creme fraiche base.
              Anyone wanting to make anything with fruit that is not in season can be purchased frozen as an alternative...But
              when doing this make sure there is no ice at all and allow to drain in a collander or sift.
              Place all ingredients into a saucepan- no sugar (you will find it already has a high sugar content after they add it)
              Simply bring to a simmer and add anything you may want say some other fruits or herbs such as" mint ".
              Add any alchohol you may want at this stage and let it thicken or (reduce) to your desired consistency.
              Allow to cool and serve with a meal or nice fruit filled ice-cream or even maybe decorate your plate !!
              Or leave it hot and serve with ice-cream or cream or as a sauce over your fish !!!


Thanks all Robert34
             
You dont always get what you want but you get what you need !

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Re: Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2008, 07:09:29 AM »
Robert, Thanks for the addition your thoughts on compote sound yummy :)
Russian/Ukrainian compote is a drink either served as a meal or just to drink cause it tastes great!

Offline Chris

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Re: Olga's recipe for Compote
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2008, 07:42:30 AM »
Robert, Thanks for the addition your thoughts on compote sound yummy :)
Russian/Ukrainian compote is a drink either served as a meal or just to drink cause it tastes great!

I had litres of the Ukrainian Red Current compote at Christmas and New Year while in Chernivsty, it was served with every meal along with Gorilka of course :) I quite liked it, just a little sweet for me though.

With the Christmas meal they served a different version, I think it was a mixed fruit compote? they told me they only have it that time of year.

Offline mendeleyev

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Russian/Ukrainian breads and cakes
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2008, 08:07:59 PM »
RUSSIAN BLACK BREAD - черный хлеб

INGREDIENTS:4 cups unsifted rye flour
3 cups unsifted white flour
1 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. salt
2 cups whole bran cereal
2 tbsp. crushed caraway seed
2 tsp. instant coffee (or powdered, used, coffee grounds!)
2 tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. fennel seed, crushed
2 pckg. active dry yeast
2-1/2 cups water
1/4 cup vinegar (or 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar)
1/4 cup DARK molasses
1 square (1 oz) UN-sweetened chocolate (or Baker's Redi-Blend)
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) margarine
1 tsp. cornstarch
1/2 cup COLD water (*icy* cold!)

Combine the rye and white flours.  Mix thorouoghly (use a large bowl) 2-1/3
cups of the flour mixture, the sugar, salt, cereal, caraway seed, coffee,
onion powder, fennel seed and *undissolved* dry yeast.

Combine 2-1/2 cups of water, vinegar, molasses, chocolate and margarine in a
saucepan.  Heat over LOW heat until the liquids are very warm.  Margarine
and chocolate do NOT need to melt.  Gradually add the mixture to the dry
ingredients and beat for about two minutes with your mixer, scraping the
bowl from time to time.  Add 1/2 cup of the flour mixture. Beat at HIGH
speed for about two minutes, scraping the bowl occasionally.  Stir in enough
additional mixture of the flour to make a *soft* dough.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board.  Cover and let it rest for
about 15 minutes.  Then knead until smooth and elastic - where it gets that
special sheen well-kneaded dough gets, about 10 to 15 minutes.  The dough
may be sticky, but that's OK.  Place the dough in a greased bowl, turning to
grease the top of the dough as well as the bottom. 

Cover and let it rise in a warm place, free from any draft (I stick it in the oven - the pilot light
keeps it warm enough....if you use an electric stoves turn the oven to
about 100 degrees and keep the door SHUT.  When the dough has doubled in
bulk (usually about an hour), punch it down, turn it out onto a lightly
floured board. Divide in half.  Shape each half into a ball about 5 inches
across.  Place each ball into the center of a greased 8-inch round cake pan.
Cover, and let it rise in the same warm place, free from draft, until
they're both doubled in bulk again.  Usually about another hour - depending
on the weather outside.  Don't laugh. It's true.  Never try to bake bread
while it's raining.

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Bake in a 350 degree oven for 45 to 50 minutes, or until done (depending on
the weather).  Meanwhile, combine the cornstarch and the icewater.  Cook
over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture just starts to
boil; continue to cook, stirring constantly, for another minute.  As soon as
the bread is baked, brush the cornstarch mixture over the top of the loaves.
Return the bread to the oven and bake for another two or three minutes,
until the glaze is set. 

Remove from the pans and cool on wire racks.

You can LIVE on this bread, with nothing else to eat, for months.
Leningraders did it for almost three and a half years........

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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Desserts and Speciality Foods
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2008, 03:43:29 PM »
Noodle Pies

These are excellent as a dessert or to serve when guests come for tea!
 
Ingredients:
Pie Crust
500g egg noodles or vermicelli.
50g butter.
1 cup (loosely packed) grated cheese.
1/4 tsp salt.
2 eggs, beaten.

Filling
25g butter.
3 1/2 tbsp flour.
1/2 finely chopped onion.
250g sour cream.
2 eggs yolks, beaten.
1/4 tsp lemon juice.
1 cup (loosely packed) grated cheese.

 
Method:

Pie Crust
Boil the noodles in salted water until 'al dante' - firm but not hard. Drain well.

Melt 50g of butter in a large saucepan. Add salt and noodles, followed by the beaten eggs and grated cheese. Stir to combine.


Filling
In a saucepan melt the butter, add the chopped onion and stir in the flour. Fry until the onion softens.

Stir in the sour cream and heat through. If the mix turns out very thick, stir in some milk to create a creamy consistency.

Remove the filling from the stove and set aside to cool.

When cool, stir in the beaten egg yolks, lemon juice and grated cheese.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C.

Grease two large muffin trays with butter and coat with fine bread or rice crumbs.

Arrange the noodles in each tray cavity in a massed coil. Top with a single layer of noodles which will form the lid to the pies.

Bake the noodles for between 15 and 25 minutes depending on how crisp you like them when cooked.

Remove the noodles from the oven and leave to cool to the point you are able to handle them. Take each noodle 'pie' out and cut the top layer off to form the lid. A pair of sharp kitchen scissors is ideal for this.

Scoop some of the noodles out of the base to form a hole for the filling.

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Place 1 -2 heaped teaspoons of the filling into the hole, top with the lid and place the pies back in the muffin tray. Beat the left over egg white and pour over each pie. Top with a little extra grated cheese.

Return to pies to the oven for 5 or so minutes to warm.

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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Desserts and Speciality Foods
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2008, 03:50:34 PM »
"Kisel" Berry Fruit Wine

 
Ingredients:
450g raspberries, boysenberries, strawberries or blueberries.
600ml water.
100g sugar.
150ml red wine.


Method

Place the clean washed fruit into a saucepan with the water.
Add the wine.  
Bring to a boil, turn down the heat and simmer for 15- 20 minutes, or until the fruit is very pulpy.

Strain the liquid but do not press the fruit otherwise it will make the juice cloudy.

Return the juice to the saucepan and stir in the sugar. Bring to the boil, turn down the heat and simmer until the sugar has dissolved.

Remove from the heat, cool then decant into a bottle and chill for several hours before serving.

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Alternate Kisel recipe from www.ehow.com

Things You’ll Need:
1 quart of berries: strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, or mixed
1 cup of sugar
6 tbsp. of potato starch
Step 1:
Wash and dry the berries, and then puree them.

Step 2:
Separate the juice and the pulp: filter the juice into a bowl, and the pulp into a saucepan.

Step 3:
Add 1 1/2 quarts of water to the saucepan, and 4/5 of a cup of sugar. Stir and heat until the berries are soft (which should take about 5 minutes), or until the water reaches a boil.

Step 4:
Meanwhile, stir the potato starch into the bowl of juice. When the berries soften, or when the pulp reaches a boil, add the bowl of starch juice, and stir over low heat. Turn off the heat once the mixture has adequately thickened, or when it returns to a boil.

Step 5:
Remove and chill. Pour it into desert bowls, or glasses.

Step 6:
Sprinkle 1-2 tbsp. of sugar over the kisel. Refrigerate for 1 hour and serve


Here is an example using Kisel as a topping for cheesecake:

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Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Desserts and Speciality Foods
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2008, 03:54:36 PM »
"Tvorog" Russian Curd Cheese

 
Ingredients:
1 litre 'Family' milk.
150g pottle Greek-style yoghurt.


Preparation
Combine the milk with the yoghurt in a lidded container, such as an ice cream container or yoghurt maker. Stand in a very warm place until the mixture resembles yoghurt. A yoghurt maker is ideal for this part of the process.

The temperature and length of time to form the yoghurt stage will effect the taste. Tvorog should have a 'bite' to it, but if you keep it too long at this stage it can become bitter.

Reserve around half a cup of the yoghurt mix and keep in the fridge to start your next batch of tvorog.

Tip the remainder of the mix into a saucepan and place on the stove at a low temperature. Allow the mix to come to a gentle bubble, do not stir.

Leave the saucepan on the element until the mixture separates into curds, resembling the texture of cottage cheese, and the yellow watery whey. Turn off the heat and leave to cool.

Line a colander with 3 layers of muslin. Place the colander into a larger bowl or in the sink. Pour the mixture from the saucepan into the muslin and allow the whey to drain out.

When most of the liquid has drained out, draw the ends of the muslin together at the top and secure with a rubber band or knot to form a bag. Hang the muslin bag over a tap to drain thoroughly. The tvorog should be very dry - much drier than cottage cheese.

Remove the tvorog from the muslin and store in a container in the fridge.

Makes around 250g of tvorog. To make more just double the amount of ingredients

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Excellent addition from our contributor Rasputin:
This the way that my wife makes our tvorog.

The first step is making some kefir. We have a special bacterial culture that we keep in netting. We bring milk to a boil, let it cool for a few hours (until it is room temperature) and then put kefir bacterial culture in the milk. In a day (two maximum) the kefir is ready and put into the fridge.

When we have some extra kefir (2 litres) we mix this kefir with 1.5 litres of milk. We put it on the stove at minimum for a few hours until the tvorog has separated from the whey. The tvorog is then drained (as you indicated) and refrigerated.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Desserts-Torts-Compotes-etc
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2008, 03:58:27 PM »
French Toast with Jam Filling

Even before the French invaded Russia, French was the second language of the aristoratic upper class Russians.   It was the language of culture and nobility.

 
Ingredients:
1 loaf French bread.
2 large eggs or 3 small.
2 cups milk.
1/2 cup berry fruit jam.
50g butter.
Icing sugar for serving.


Preparation
Cut the French bread into large diagonal wedges about 1cm wide. Spread one side with jam and cover with another slice to form a sandwich.

In a large flat dish, beat together the eggs and milk.

Soak the french bread in the milk and egg on both sides until all the liquid has been absorbed.

Melt the butter in a large frying pan and fry the bread until lightly golden on each side.

Serving:
Serve the toast hot from the pan, sprinkled with icing sugar.