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Author Topic: Moldova  (Read 3057 times)

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Offline justme

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Moldova
« on: October 30, 2007, 08:50:47 AM »
Just looking for some info/input on this area.  I have read a bit about the country and find it to be a disturbed/struggling region, still trying to find its way in the world.  Also read about abuse in the country.  Anyone have any insight here, especially in regard to women there, and to Americans visiting there.

Offline Olga

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2007, 09:07:46 AM »

Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2007, 09:56:28 AM »
Thank you Olga.  Those sites confirmed what I have already read.  The first site was not in English, so I could not st that one.  I am specifically interested in personal knowledge anyone has on this region and the people there.


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Re: Moldova
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2007, 12:00:33 PM »
Moldava,

Dutch government put it on a "do-not-go-there" list and I cannot drive there by car as my insurance-policy does not allow it. I can goto Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, etc. etc. no problem but not there!
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Online andrewfi

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2007, 12:18:57 PM »
I spent a few weeks in Moldova a few years ago. Had a great time.

It is a poor place. I have never been to another capital city (Chisinau) where they turn off the street lights to save money. It used to be that on Stefan Cel Mare there was one working streetlamp - Outside MacDonalds - Guess who paid for it?

Quite densely populated, used to be a centre of electronics manufacture in the waybackwhen but is now largely into agriculture and people export.

I should have gone back but somehow never got round to it.

Why would one go there on a wife hunt though unless one was seeking to maximise one's economic advantage? It is a pain in the arse to get there and, unless things have changed, hotels are exensive and crap.

But I really have no regrets about my sojourn there.

...everything ends always well; if it’s still bad, then it’s not the end!

Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2007, 01:49:47 PM »
Markje...any reason why it has been banned.  Is it a safety issue, or just because its not worth the time and effort?
Also, any idea what language would be spoken there.  What I read says Moldovian, but indicates that it is another language that they adopted with a few changes.

If there is a problem going there, would it be possible to meet someone from there at another location?

Andrewfi...when you went there was there a lot of political unrest.  There also seems to be a human export business to worry about.

Online Markje

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2007, 02:02:56 PM »
Markje...any reason why it has been banned.  Is it a safety issue, or just because its not worth the time and effort?
Also, any idea what language would be spoken there.  What I read says Moldovian, but indicates that it is another language that they adopted with a few changes.

If there is a problem going there, would it be possible to meet someone from there at another location?

Andrewfi...when you went there was there a lot of political unrest.  There also seems to be a human export business to worry about.

The official reason the government give is: Police brutality towards foreigners. The percentage of citizens this happens to get above 20% means the government says "don't go there".

It means that travel agents will not book you there, you have to do everything yourself but they will help you if you get into trouble.

It may have changed with new administration, but you know how government works and the amount of time it takes :)
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Online Markje

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2007, 02:18:30 PM »
Official dutch government report on Moldava:

Terrorist threat: Small but not negligable

Actual situation
Moldova is not a dangerous country, but the tension in its border areas Transnistrie is very present. Traveling in this county is not recommended as they plan to separate from the country of moldava.

Roads and traffic: Erratic and chaotic, avoid driving a car yourself at all cost and favor mass-transportation in regards to your own personal health

Climate: The country of moldava are on a geological crack, but otherwise weather is not dangerous.

Hygiene: Do not drink local free running water, use bottles. Otherwise no special injections needed.

Travelling document: Valid passport+travel visa requiered. Passport should be valid at least 6 months after exitting the country.

(translated by markje from dutch)

As I read it, if you avoid the named county with the difficult name, you should not have problems in Moldova

You can change anything in life, but a BMW only for a BMW
My first trip to my wife: To Evpatoria!
My road trip to Crimea: Roadtrip to Evpatoria

Offline Olga

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2007, 02:31:22 PM »
CRIME:  Moldova’s economic difficulties, as well as increased organized criminal activity and more frequent travel by foreigners to Moldova, contribute to the risk visitors face from street crime, some potentially violent.  While this risk is no greater than in most cities in the United States, many Americans have reported theft of money and small valuables from hotel rooms and local apartments.  Cases of breaking and entering into homes and offices have occurred.  Travelers are wise to exercise the same precautions with regard to personal safety and protection of valuables in Chisinau that they would in any major U.S. city.

Precautions should also be taken when using ATM machines in Moldova.  Some Americans have reported unauthorized withdrawals from their accounts after using ATMs.  Instances have been reported of PIN theft from use of ATMs in Moldova, either by “skimming” devices, which record the ATM card information while in use, or by surreptitious observation.

Train and bus services are below Western European standards and some U.S. citizens have been victims of crimes involving thefts while traveling on international trains to and from Moldova.

Americans who use the Moldovan postal service report frequent losses from international letter and package mail.

Internet Fraud Warning:  The U.S. Embassy is aware of various confidence schemes that have taken advantage of American citizens, frequently via the Internet.  In some cases, these involve the purchase or sale of items on the Internet in which the payment or shipment of goods was not completed by a Moldovan counterpart.  In the spring of 2006, Moldovan police recovered over $250,000 in jewelry that was sent to “buyers” in Moldova from the U.S. via fake online escrow companies.  Substantial criminal enterprises specializing in this type of crime (Internet auction fraud) are emerging in Moldova.  In other cases, American citizens, particularly males, have met potential Moldovan fiancé(e)s on the Internet who have convinced them to send hundreds or even thousands of dollars, but have no intention of a serious relationship.  Once the American citizen starts to question the reason for sending the money, the Moldovan fiancé(e)s suddenly ends his/her contact.  On occasion, American citizens who come to Moldova to visit someone they have first met over the Internet have reported becoming subject to crimes such as extortion and involuntary detention.  American citizens should be aware that any such activity committed by individuals in Moldova is subject to the Moldovan legal system and could prove difficult to prosecute. In the vast majority of cases, there is little that the U.S. Embassy can do to assist American citizens who are defrauded by Moldovans via the Internet.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:  The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.  The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.  Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_972.html

Crime in Moldova

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Moldova

Quote
Moldova is a transshipment point for illegal drugs to Western Europe and a source and transit nation in the trafficking in human beings, in particular women and girls into forced prostitution.

I saw a Russian telecast about the Human Trafficking in Moldova... Many prostitutes in Moscow are from Moldova.

Offline Olga

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2007, 02:32:05 PM »
Moldova 2007 Crime & Safety Report
Crime & Safety

Europe - Moldova
11 Oct 2007

Overall Crime and Safety Situation
 
Criminal activity in Chisinau, the capital of Moldova, remains similar to that of a mid-sized American city, while violent crime is slightly lower. Street crimes and residential burglaries occur, with property crimes and crimes of opportunity accounting for the majority. Poor or non-existent street lighting and limitations on police resources create a favorable environment for criminal elements. Few reports of expatriate-related muggings and break-ins exist, and the few that do indicate that the perpetrators are rarely armed, choosing instead to rely on stealth, speed and/or physical strength to accomplish their goals. Alcohol is frequently involved. Street criminals tend to stalk their victims, selecting unwary targets and then physically overpowering them and taking valuables.

Dark, deserted streets and walking alone after dark should to be avoided. Burglars tend to assess their targets carefully, move quickly, and avoid confrontation. Double door locks, good exterior lighting, and window grilles or metal shutters on the first floor are an effective residential deterrent and strongly recommended.
 
In 2006, the ‘Drumul Viilor/Beverly Hills’ residential area, located in the Telecentru district of Chisinau, experienced a rash of physical assaults against female victims walking alone at night. Several residential break-ins and vehicle vandalism (stolen side mirrors, scratching/keying, etc.) were reported. This residential area is considered one of the most affluent in the city and includes several diplomatic residences. Police suspect that criminal elements continue to conduct surveillance in this neighborhood to identify residences with weak security features. While most of the break-ins were perpetrated while the occupants were not at home, some residences were entered during the early morning hours while occupants were sleeping. Police have also indicated that during the hours between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., lone females are actively targeted in this neighborhood by one or two males seeking to steal personal property via physical assault. Sexual assaults are rare in Moldova.
 
One of the most popular street crimes is pick-pocketing, especially in crowded markets and buses. Theft of items from automobiles has also occurred during both day and night. Use of car alarms and ensuring valuables are secured and out of sight when the vehicle is parked are recommended, along with off-street parking in garages or driveways overnight.
 
Scams against expatriates and foreign nationals continue to increase, and this is especially true for frauds related to the Internet. The Embassy is aware of various confidence schemes that have taken advantage of Americans, frequently via the Internet. In some cases these involved an American buyer who pays for an item bought through the Internet but does not receive the item from the Moldovan seller, or an American who sells items to a Moldovan buyer but does not receive payment for the sold item. In the spring of 2006, Moldovan police recovered over $250,000 in jewelry that was sent to buyers  in Moldova from the U.S. via fake online escrow companies. Substantial criminal enterprises specializing in this type of crime (Internet auction fraud) are emerging in Moldova.
 
In other cases, American citizens, particularly males, have met potential Moldovan fiancé(s) on the Internet who have convinced them to send hundreds or even thousands of dollars, but have no intention of engaging in a serious relationship. Once the American citizen starts to question the reason for sending the money, the Moldovan fiancé(s) suddenly ends his/her contact. On occasion, American citizens who come to Moldova to visit someone they have first met over the Internet have reported becoming subject to crimes such as extortion and involuntary detention. American citizens should be aware that any such activity committed by individuals in Moldova is subject to the Moldovan legal system and could prove difficult to prosecute. In the vast majority of cases, there is little that the U.S. Embassy can do to assist American citizens who are defrauded by Moldavians via the Internet.
 
In addition, the police have advised the Embassy of several cases involving local prostitutes who have drugged and robbed foreign "clients." Such instances typically involve the use of a chemical agent surreptitiously placed in the client's alcoholic beverage, which quickly results in .the loss of consciousness (10-15 hours). Once unconscious, the client's personal belongings are stolen. According to the police, such activity is often organized and managed by local criminal groups. Prostitution is illegal in Moldova.
 
Precautions should also be taken when using ATM machines in Moldova. Some Americans have reported unauthorized withdrawals from their accounts after using ATMs. Instances have been reported of PIN theft from use of ATMs in Moldova either by "skimming" devices, which record the ATM card information while in use, or by surreptitious observation.
 
Organized criminal activity, both local and transnational in nature, exists in Moldova but is limited. Most casinos and "strip/adult clubs" are operated by organized criminal elements. However, street-level organized criminal violence is rare and does not affect expatriate areas. In the rural Moldovan countryside, criminal activity is limited. In large towns outside the capital, criminal activity is similar to that within Chisinau.
 
A separatist regime controls the Transnistria region, a narrow strip of land in eastern Moldova. The U.S. and other countries do not recognize this regime. Since no formal diplomatic relations exist, the provision of consular assistance to American citizens cannot be ensured. Travelers should exercise caution in visiting or transiting the area. Travelers should be aware that there are numerous checkpoints along the roads into and out of the Transnistria region. These checkpoints are manned by heavily armed Russian Federation soldiers. It is important that all travelers to/through this region adhere to posted signs and direction from peacekeeping authorities at these checkpoints. In the summer of 2006, grenades exploded on two buses in the capital of Transnistria, Tiraspol. These bombings resulted in several deaths.
 
Political Violence
 
Gang violence, terrorist acts, armed robbery and political violence are not currently major threats within Moldova. No political demonstrations occurred this past year near the Embassy, and no political violence was reported. Violent acts between organized crime groups, including the use of improvised explosive devices, occur periodically and can injure individuals other than the target(s).
 
Post Specific Concerns
 
Earthquake related to capable of Carpathian activity in the region is the primary concern natural disasters. Deep, sub-crust earthquakes, producing damage 500 KM away, can occur near the Mountains in Romania and be felt in Moldova.
 
Moldova's highway infrastructure consists mainly of two-lane roads that often lack markings or signage, are unevenly maintained and seldom have lighting. Caution should be taken to prevent collisions with agricultural vehicles and/or livestock. Urban roads in Moldova are infrequently maintained and often lack clear signs or lane markings. Travel outside of urban areas before dawn and dusk should be avoided if at all possible. Drivers and pedestrians should exercise extreme caution to avoid accidents, which are commonplace. Many Moldovan drivers would be considered aggressive or erratic by American standards. Many accidents involve drunk drivers. The quality and safety of public transportation vary widely. Trains, trolleybuses, and buses are often old and may break-down. Taxis are available in most urban areas, and vary from old Soviet-era vehicles to newer-model vehicles. Only licensed and registered taxis should be utilized.
 
Police Response
 
Most police are underpaid and have occasionally gone unpaid for long durations. "Shakedowns" remain possible, especially by individuals in plain-clothes identifying themselves as police officers. If approached by an individual claiming to be a police officer, identification should be requested immediately. Police routinely stop and question individuals, particularly those who appear "foreign," on the street at night. Identification papers (passports) are often checked and should be carried at all times. Individuals who become the victim of a crime in Chisinau can contact the police at telephone number 902. The ability to report the problem in either Russian or Romanian is essential. Police are normally professional, but suffer from limited resources which impacts on their response time.
 
Medical Emergencies
 
Emergency ambulatory assistance in the event of a medical emergency can be reached in Chisinau via telephone number 903. Again, Russian or Romanian language ability is critical. Medical care in Moldova is substandard throughout the country, including in Chisinau. In the event of serious medical conditions every effort should be made to go to Western Europe. Hospital accommodations are inadequate throughout the country and advanced medical technology is lacking. Shortages of routine medications and supplies may be encountered. Elderly travelers and those with existing health problems may be at particular risk due to inadequate medical facilities.
 
Travel Precautions
 
Visitors should exercise the same security precautions they would in any large American metropolitan area: stay alert, don't be predictable, remain aware of your surroundings, and trust your instincts. Also, try to avoid ‘standing out’ as an American and remember most difficulties afflicting visitors occur at night and involve alcohol. Property crime remains the major criminal activity affecting foreigners in Moldova, so keep valuables out of sight if on your person and secure your vehicle.
 
Further Information
 
U.S. Embassy Chisinau is located at 103 Mateevici Street in Chisinau. In emergency situations, U.S. citizens can contact the Consular Officer via the embassy switchboard at: (373) (22) 408-300 (during business hours, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday) or the Embassy duty officer (after business hours) via the embassy switchboard. The Regional Security officer (RSO) can be also reached (373) (22) 408-300 for further security related information.
 
OSAC Country Council
 
The OSAC Moldova Country Council is currently in the developmental stages. Please contact RSO Chisinau or the OSAC Eastern Europe Coordinator for further information.

https://www.osac.gov/Reports/report.cfm?contentID=74138

Online andrewfi

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2007, 03:37:21 PM »
As with many things what you read is designed to reassure scared people.
When I was there back in 2002 (IIRC) there was not political unrest and there still is not.
I doubt many visitors will be victms of internet fraud whilst there.

The Transniestria issue remains unresolved though.

The reason that Mark's car insurance does not cover his car is two fold:
1) Most EU insurers hated to have to insure cars for anywhere within the EU, they made a fortune out of bolt-ons. Now they will not give automatic cover for countries outside the EU.
2) Moldova IS a risky place for foreign motors. A large number of the very tasty Mercs and Bimmers are 'imported' from the streets of Germany.

Insurance notwithstanding I'd not take a car there but there is no good reason unless one is Romanian coming to visit family.

Language is, in Moldova, called Moldavian, it is the same as Romanian. Kinda like Australians calling their language Australian. (for those who don't know, Australians speak English and not Austrian. ;) )

In reality one is pretty safe in Moldova but just as here, I'd not get falling over drunk in a strange area and walk home. It is a poor country and thus there is always going to be an element of crime based upon envy/wealth disparity and only a loon would walk around with a gold Rolex and carrying wads of cash.
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Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2007, 06:50:18 PM »
Thank you Markje, Olga and Andrewfi, for those very informative reports.  From what I have read(which coincides with what Olga posted), and the feeling I get from you guys, I think I may avoid that particular area.  It sounds like they have been taking lessons from Nigeria on the internet scams.  Anyway, I am sure there are much better places to seek a partner...at least places with less threats.

Online Markje

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2007, 02:27:21 AM »
As with many things what you read is designed to reassure scared people.

The reason that Mark's car insurance does not cover his car is two fold:
1) Most EU insurers hated to have to insure cars for anywhere within the EU, they made a fortune out of bolt-ons. Now they will not give automatic cover for countries outside the EU.

I checked my car's registration for insurance and there is only 1 country on the do-not-go-there list : Moldava!

Countries outside my own continent are: Saoudi-arabia, Irak, Afghanistan, Iran.

All other countries (including china, russia, ukraine, romania, etc. etc.) are valid and I can go there.
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My first trip to my wife: To Evpatoria!
My road trip to Crimea: Roadtrip to Evpatoria

Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2007, 05:59:24 AM »
Does not sound like Moldova is keeping good company.

Offline Donhollio

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2007, 10:42:48 PM »
Hey good news !  I don't need a visa to enter Moldova !     Years ago I was planning on going there to meet a girl. When I asked her what some of the things she could show me in the capital city she replied, " there's nothing nice in my country."
 I never did go,and here's what Canada has to say to it's citizens :  A lot of this was in red print !


MoldovaExercise normal security precautions Exercise high degree of caution Avoid non-essential travel Avoid all travel

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Canadians travelling to Moldova should exercise a high degree of caution. Violent crime can occur, particularly in Chisinau. Street crime, such as mugging, pickpocketing, and purse snatching, is prevalent. Organized crime is widespread.

Regional WarningExercise normal security precautions Exercise high degree of caution Avoid non-essential travel Avoid all travel

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
OFFICIAL WARNING: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada advises against all travel. (IDW11)

You are advised against all travel to the northeastern Transdniestria region. The security situation is unstable and unpredictable, and the region is not under government control. There are frequent checkpoints.

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION RECOMMENDATION: We offer a registration service for all Canadians travelling or living abroad. This service is provided so that we can contact and assist you in an emergency in a foreign country, such as a natural disaster or civil unrest, or inform you of a family emergency at home. Registration can be done on-line or by contacting a Canadian government office abroad. For more information, see our FAQs on Registration of Canadians Abroad.

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3. SAFETY AND SECURITY

It is the responsibility of individual travellers to make informed travel choices. The Government of Canada takes very seriously the safety and security of Canadians abroad and provides credible and timely advice in its Country Travel Reports. Situations vary from country to country, and there may be constraints on government resources, which can limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide assistance, particularly in countries where the potential for violent conflict or political instability are high. In the event of a crisis situation that requires evacuation, the Government of Canada’s policy is to provide safe transportation to the closest safe location. Canada will assist Canadians in leaving a country as a last resort, when all means of commercial or personal transportation have been exhausted. This service is provided on a cost-recovery basis. Onward travel is at the individual’s personal expense.

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety. The purpose of this Travel Report is to provide Canadians with up-to-date information to enable them to make well-informed decisions.

Ensure your personal belongings, passports, and other travel documents are secure. Do not show signs of affluence. Theft on trains and from hotel rooms is common. Do not travel alone after dark. Demonstrations can occur and you should avoid them. Local police can be contacted at 902 and ambulance services at 903. However, most dispatchers only speak Moldovan (Romanian) or Russian.

Be careful when using ABMs. There have been cases of PIN theft, and some travellers have reported unauthorized withdrawals from their accounts after using ABMs.

Internet fraud, ranging from product purchases to Internet romances, is on the rise in Moldova. You should be cautious of these and other Internet scams.

Incidents of police requesting a bribe have been reported. You should report any such incident to the Embassy of Canada in Bucharest, Romania.

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4. ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS

The following information on entry and exit requirements has been confirmed with the Moldovan authorities and was valid on May 9, 2007. However, entry and exit requirements are subject to change.

It is the sole prerogative of each country to determine who is allowed to enter. All countries have special requirements for persons intending to reside for extended periods (usually more than 90 days) or who plan to work, study, or engage in non-tourist activities. To obtain information on specific entry requirements, contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the country or countries to be visited. Violations of entry and exit requirements may result in serious penalties.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada’s Office of Protocol provides contact details for the Embassy of the Republic of Moldova, where you can obtain further information on entry and exit requirements.

A valid Canadian passport is required for Canadians intending to visit Moldova. The passport must be valid for at least six months beyond the date of entry into the country.

Tourist Visa: Not required
Business Visa: Not required
Student Visa: Not required

Foreign visitors must register with the police within three days of arrival. Hotels will usually register their guests automatically. However, registration remains the responsibility of the traveller. Those who fail to do so may be required to appear in court and pay a fine.

Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2007, 09:13:33 AM »
I think it would be safe to say that there are better places to visit.  This has been placed on my "no way am I going there list".

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2007, 11:19:22 AM »
If you don't go because of what is written by scared people, for scared people then you will be the poorer.

Don't forget that in the scheme of things the chances of any one of us facing any kind of danger, on a day to day basis, is very tiny.

I know that I was entirely safe during my stay because I am a sensible person who knows how to look after himself. Others are less sensible and suffer the consequences, both in terms of what happens to them AND in terms of the experiences they must avoid, in order to protect themselves from themselves.

The warnings you read are, as always, written for the benefit of the LCDs (lowest common denominator) people. Read what they say for knowledge and preparedness and proceed with appropriate caution. Disregard the conclusions and inferences; they are, I'd hope, meant for different people to you.

However, if the choice to not visit Moldova is based upon avoiding the place so as to not feel that one is simply buying a wife then, in part I say 'well done!' and in part I say 'to thine own self be true'. There are many good women in Moldova and I have to say that I gave serious consideration to living there in order to further my relationship with one of them. If one has the discrimination to be able to make good choices then Moldova is not a bad place to go.
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Offline Manny

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2007, 05:44:55 PM »
I think it would be safe to say that there are better places to visit.  This has been placed on my "no way am I going there list".

OK, I gotta jump in.

I have never been, I must say that first. But I have been to *many* shady places in the FSU.

I echo Andrews thoughts above, dont be a scared tourist, just use your brain, blend in and you will be fine.

If doing this again, I *would* look in Moldova most certainly!

Realise that the apprehension you have is what prevents many WM from going there, hence many smokinhot women with no husband.

I have been to many places that were *not safe* and the Government sites advised against, I just met regular folk who were mostly cool. I have been in pissy stairwells in Russia with drunk locals eyeing up my Rolex, but I can find similar places in Manchester if I look.

Use your brain, dont look like a tourist and you will be fine.

When you have booked a flight, make a thread called "Moldova - I am going - Advise me!" - You will get some advice and do fine!  :)


Offline justme

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Re: Moldova
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2007, 06:05:07 PM »
If there is anything I want people to understand about me...its that I am not a rash person...hence my time here asking so many newbie questions.  I am also not a coward.  I have studied many different styles of martial arts since I was in the 9th grade.  My current profession is Private Investigator so I can assure you that I am in no way unwise to the ways of the world.  But one thing I have learned over the years, is that while we could all die in a car crash at any time, it is best not to go looking for trouble.  While I am a better fighter than most, I will avoid one if it is at all possible...even if I expect to win.  I feel that I am as able anyone to blend in and make the trip, but at the same time, I would prefer not to have to worry about dealing with a country that appears to have no real structure.  I would prefer not to deal with a divided country that is currently having troubles discerning where its borders are or who all belongs to the country.  I think Russia or the Ukraine will be fine at this point, but I will leave my options open. 

You guys are all great for taking the time to give information so freely, and I really appreciate all of you.  This is such a great site.  Thanks again.

Offline Chris

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No Visas for Americans to Moldova
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2007, 03:58:13 AM »
No Visas for Americans to Moldova


I have heard through a reliable source this is now the case? anyone else heard this?


So I looked further and I then went on to find this