The World's #1 Russian, Ukrainian & Eastern European Discussion & Information Forum - RUA!

This Is the Premier Discussion Forum on the Net for Information and Discussion about Russia, Ukraine, Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union. Discuss Culture, Politics, Travelling, Language, International Relationships and More. Chat with Travellers, Locals, Residents and Expats. Ask and Answer Questions about Travel, Culture, Relationships, Applying for Visas, Translators, Interpreters, and More. Give Advice, Read Trip Reports, Share Experiences and Make Friends.

Author Topic: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine  (Read 32332 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #60 on: July 27, 2011, 01:40:24 AM »
Website of Oksana >  http://www.mas-art.com/  <

Website of the Biennale  >  http://www.labiennale.org/en/Home.html   <
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Offline nicknick

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 678
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Status: Just Looking
  • Trips: 5-10
Last chance to see
« Reply #61 on: October 08, 2011, 08:37:34 AM »

However, on a more general point  that may be of interest to others, what I've always found very interesting about the auctions is that you can go and see all these great paintings for no charge at all.

The paintings at the galleries will be there on display forever and you can go back and see them time after time.  But the paintings that come up for auction will likely never be seen in public again for god knows how many years, so this really is a once in a lifetime chance to see them up close in real life.

...

If you're the sort of person that enjoys the odd trip to an art gallery then I would suggest it's well worthwhile also going along to viewings held by auction houses.  Whether your interest is in Russian art, or French Impressionists or Scottish Colourists or Chinese porcelain you can actually see close up some of the very best works of art simply by going along to a viewing at an auction house - at the very least, it makes a change from visiting  the Guggenheim, the Met, Tate Britain or the National Gallery.

Just picking up on a thread from earlier this year.

For people interested in seeing some Russian art and live near enough to New York there is an auction coming up on 1st November with viewing before that.

Two of the highlights of the auction are, I would suggest, a painting by Vereshchagin from his travels in India:-

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]

He sold the painting to an American collector in 1891 who then donated it to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts the following year.  So, unless another gallery buys it this is probably your last chance to see it.

The painting was purchased for $2,100 and the estimate now is $3 to 5 million - not a bad return on the investment I guess.

The other painting is one by Shishkin that he painted in Crimea in 1879:-

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]

The last time this painting was seen in public was at a short exhibition in Australia in 2008.  So, if you do want to see it in real life any time soon, this will probably be the last chance for a long time.

A link to details about the exhibition is here:-

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2011/important-russian-art/overview.html

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot


Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #63 on: August 06, 2016, 09:25:49 AM »
Art 101 for Russian speakers:

[ Guests cannot view attachments ]
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online yankee

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1221
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Russia
  • Status: Married
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #64 on: August 06, 2016, 06:09:59 PM »
Art 101 for Russian speakers:

(Attachment Link)

This is a good example to learn about styles in contemporary art.
What is worse than not being able to get what you don't even want?

Offline Larissa 2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
  • Country: ru
  • Gender: Female
  • Status: Just Looking
  • Trips: None Yet
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #65 on: August 23, 2016, 08:22:55 AM »
Pictures of Paul Rizhenko.Battle of the Neva.
People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed; never throw out anyone.
Audrey Hepburn

Offline Larissa 2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
  • Country: ru
  • Gender: Female
  • Status: Just Looking
  • Trips: None Yet
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #66 on: August 23, 2016, 08:33:23 AM »
Pictures of Paul Rizhenko. Battle of Kulikovo.
People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed; never throw out anyone.
Audrey Hepburn

Offline Gipsy

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: 00
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #67 on: August 23, 2016, 08:40:46 AM »
Larissa  :thumbsup:
Bridge is a lot like sex, either you need a good partner, or a decent hand... Woody Allen

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #68 on: September 27, 2016, 02:04:08 AM »
In contemporary art there is the Englishman Damien Hirst who runs a very large studio with numerous assistants working where examples of his art are ‘painted or manufactured’ depending on your perspective. But in the 17th century there was the prototype artist of this style of production, Peter Paul Rubens (1577 ~ 1640). It should be noted that while the northern half of Europe was moving towards a Protestant belief. Rubens himself was remained quite Catholic. A large studio where his paintings were created was located in Antwerp and he had a number of talented artists working for him to create many religous and historical paintings. He also undertook at the time a number of diplomatic missions in Spain, Italy and France.

There is an expression referring to Rubensesque figure. Today some would say fat, but in the 17th century this was considered both healthy and beautiful. Paintings by Rubens can be found in every major museum around the world. For those who need to understand things in numbers, a work of art painted more or less entirely by Rubens can make tens of millions of €, $ or £ with relative ease at auction or in a gallery.

Painted in 1610 or so Catherine the Great of Russia gave a painting to Alexander Nevsky Lavra (Monastery) in St. Petersburg, titled the Resurrection of Christ. As the Soviets came to power this overtly Christian painting was removed from view. With centuries of varnish hiding the original paint and detail it was resigned to storage as a copy from the studio of Rubens. For the good order we are speaking of a painting larger than 15 feet in height and some 9 feet in width. About five years ago some in the Hermitage again studied the painting and decided to look closer at it. A cleaning and restoration revealed this was in fact the real McCoy ok Rubens and now fully cleaned and restored hangs in the Hermitage.

I should note that this is not a discovery but rather a realization. It was always a Rubens the art experts just did not see it. 
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #69 on: May 31, 2017, 02:53:53 AM »
http://theartnewspaper.com/news/museums/russia-s-regional-collections-get-left-out-in-the-cold/

There are stories from other sources that point to the same neglect in Russia.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #71 on: February 14, 2018, 05:35:20 PM »
While a moderator may wish to move this post to another thread this seems to be as good as any place to post it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/14/magazine/a-literary-road-trip-into-the-heart-of-russia.html

On a number of levels this is an amazing article. It is a long read and an understanding of Slavic literature is helpful. But the article not only in the breadth and background but also the change in perspective and realization of the writer Kierkegaard, as he sees Russian and realises the reality. Some where else there is a thread of Travels in Siberia that I think I started again in this case it was an American in Russia who came to a parallel understanding. In both cases a writer that realises that many of the assumptions of prejudices that are shown on an unfortunate regular basis and I will note ON A BROAD SPECTRUM OF RUA POSTERS are shown to be faulty.

Myself included rarely understand the Slavic psyche. Through our travels or our partners we see a glimpse.

“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #72 on: February 15, 2018, 05:55:55 AM »
of the writer Kierkegaard

A correction the author is not S. Kierkegaard, not withstanding the opinion of my laptop, it is in fact K. O. Knausgaard.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot

Offline Manny

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 15882
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Russia
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #73 on: August 06, 2018, 11:45:54 AM »
One thing is very good though - such pre-turbulence times produce a lot of interesting art forms here, I enjoy the paintings by the artist Kopeikin a lot, for instance.

The quote above prompted me to wake this thread up.

On the subject of Russian art, or in this case Soviet art, I encountered this recently that spoke to me (as art must). I wouldn't mind a nice print of that if anyone knows where to get one.



I have several Andrei Protsouk pictures at home that are in a not dissimilar style.

please tell me where I'm being / have been 'dishonest'? 
Yes, he said that.........

Online AvHdB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11164
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouses Country: Ukraine, Kiev
  • Status: Married
  • Trips: 20+
Re: Culture and Arts in Russia & Ukraine
« Reply #74 on: August 06, 2018, 07:08:46 PM »
Andrei P. has an exhibition currently in San Diego and his own web site.

His work does not appear on AskArt or ArtNet. His work has not been offered by any of the major auction firms. If one enjoys it no harm.
“If you aren't in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” T.S. Eliot


 

 

Registration