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Author Topic: Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin  (Read 37964 times)

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Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #285 on: May 01, 2010, 03:39:58 AM »
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The Presidential Orchestra’s “home” is in the Moscow Kremlin’s Troitskaya (Trinity) Tower. It may not look that large from a distance, but this, the tallest of the Kremlin towers, houses rehearsal rooms, modern digital recording studios and the Orchestra’s offices.


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Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #286 on: May 01, 2010, 03:47:55 AM »
You thought that we were finished with music, now didn't you?   :)

I don't know about you, but something just isn't right about Russian guys wearing skirts! Please, I know they're "kilts" but seriously, let the Scottish guys wear skirts. I don't mind that, but dude, this is Russia! Sunglasses aside, they don't even look Russian! :chuckle:


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Guess where these guys practice, have offices and record? Like the other musicians, the Kremlin Palace Regiment's Pipe band makes their home in the Trinity tower, too.   :chuckle:

Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #287 on: May 01, 2010, 03:57:21 AM »
Approximately two-thirds of the Kremlin is off-limits to visitors, including the Arsenal, the Presidium, the Terem, Faceted and Great Kremlin Palaces and most of the buildings in the northern half of the fortress. All of that territory is occupied by various President's offices, his residence and the Kremlin Guards.

Tourists have access to most of the cathedrals, the Armory, the Patriarch's Palace and the State Kremlin Palace, which hosts regular concerts and gala performances. The Kremlin section of the RUA Moscow tour has taken you to those places where tourists and even many ordinary Russians may never enjoy.

With that in mind, we'd like to acknowledge the courtesy of the Presidential Protocol Office and the Presidential Press Service for making this part of Russia more open and enjoyable for everyone.

First off, kudos to a very good photographer, President Dmitry Medvedev, for lifting the decades old ban on professional photography on Red Square! Thank you, sir. You understand modern media and social networking better than perhaps any other modern leader and your understanding and cooperation with those in the professional/media photography services is noted and appreciated.

Next, how about opening up the Kremlin as well? We understand the need for tighter security inside the Kremlin territory, and thank you for access to the Presidential Press Services, but today's technology is well capable to ascertain camera integrity and detect planted threats. If a professional can be cleared to work with photos inside, and tourists are allowed consumer grade cameras outside with a ticket, why not open up the opportunity for professional equipment everywhere on the grounds, too? Just a thought.  :biggrin:

Press Attache for the President: Natalya Aleksandrovna Timakova
Chief of the Presidential Press and Information Office: Andrei Mikhailovich Tsybulin
Chief of Presidential Protocol-Kremlin: Marina Valentinovna Entaltseva (Miss Manners!...and fluent in English)
Chief of Presidential Protocol-Abroad: Sergei Alexandrovich Sobolev


Tour the Kremlin tips:
- You'll need rubles for tickets to the Kremlin so make a currency exchange before you arrive.
- Purchase an additional ticket if you intend to use a camera to take pictures. Video cameras are strictly forbidden and the cutoff for what security considers a consumer or professional still camera is 70 mm lens.
- If you need to check items for retrieval later, go down the stairs from the kiosk in Alexander Gardens. There is a cloak room at the entrance.
- While at the Alexander Gardens, pick up a map of the Kremlin. It's a bigger place than you may have realized.
- Buy tickets for everything you plan to visit while at the kiosk. Don't make yourself walk all the way back because you forgot tickets for the Cathedrals.
- Plan ahead: Some days the Kremlin is closed because of visiting foreign dignitaries or special presidential events.
- Don't even think about buying tickets from someone just standing around offering them.


Offline mendeleyev

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Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #288 on: May 01, 2010, 05:12:36 AM »
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The next segment of the RUA Tour of Moscow will continue soon, but on a new thread as 25 pages is way too much for most to navigate in one setting. We most certainly do want this tour to be a resource that members will use for reference in future trips to Moscow and beyond.

The new thread will begin geographically as we leave the Kremlin/Red Square and begin to visit the many fascinating places within walking distance of where we are now.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #289 on: July 31, 2010, 11:40:47 PM »
As of May, the "Touring Moscow" series had grown to 25 pages with thousands of readers. So to make things more managable as a travel and touring resource to RUA readers we've split the topic into more "bite size" segments:

Touring Moscow, part 1: Metro & Transportation
http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php?topic=9049.0


Touring Moscow, part 2: Arbat to Red Square
http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php?topic=12015.0


Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php?topic=12016.0



Touring Moscow, part 4 is in development stages and coming soon. It will focus on leaving Red Square and touring more of some of the central parts of this magnificant city.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #290 on: August 28, 2010, 10:51:48 PM »
Update to the segments on the Kremlin towers:

In April of this year (2010) archaeological studies were conducted in the niches of the Spasskaya and Nikolskaya towers. Two important Russian Orthodox icons, previously feared lost to the Soviets, were found under layers of plaster.

The icon found in the Spasskaya Tower depicts Jesus Christ and two saints, St Sergius of Radonezh and St Varlaam of Khutyn, below him. The exact date the fresco was painted is not known, but it was not before the middle or second half of the 17th century. Historians have affirmed that it was this sacred icon that gave the tower its previous name, which at one time was known as Frolovskaya Tower.

The last mention of the icon is from the 1930s, when a decision to cover the icon with plaster was made by the Soviets. The icon had been damaged during fighting in October 1917 when the revolution spread to Moscow.


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Today's unveiling (28 August 2010) of the restored icon above the Spasskaya Tower's gate was timed to coincide with the celebration of the Assumption of the Virgin. Despite a damp rain shower, Patriarch Kyrill of Moscow and All Russia, accompanied by President Dmitry Medvedev, conducted a prayer service for the consecration of the icon, sprinkling the tower with holy water.


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A second icon, of St Nicholas (on Nikolskaya Tower), was also uncovered at the same time.
The icon of St Nicholas dates from the late 15th or early 16th century.

Restoration work on Nikolskaya Tower will last a few months longer and a seperate consecration service will be held upon completion. The Fund of St Andrew the Apostle took on funding to restore the Kremlin gate icons. This initiative was supported by the President with the blessing of the Patriarch.


RUA feature on the Spasskaya Tower is here.


RUA feature on the Nikolskaya Tower is here.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Touring Moscow, part 3: Red Square & Kremlin
« Reply #291 on: September 28, 2011, 01:41:45 AM »
This August I was allowed to begin photography for a book project on the Kremlin towers, the story inside this thread. Hopefully in 18 to 24 months you can obtain the book!  :)

Some of you know that in the past few years I've longed to write and broadcast more on the culture and people of Russia and less of politics. Reality however has somehow intruded and politics seems to take centre stage as that is what news outlets demand.

If you've read this thread you already know that there are 20 towers; 18 have names and 2 are called the "first unnamed tower" and the "second unnamed tower." The youngest two are the Tsarskaya Tower (built in 1680) and the Petrovskaya Tower (built in 1612). Most of the others were built in the 1400s.

You know that the most recognizable tower is the Spasskaya (Saviour Tower), named for an icon inside the tower and the Spasskaya is the tower you see in photos and on TV on New Year's Eve with the famous clocks. It is close to Saint Basil's Cathedral (which isn't the correct name of the Cathedral--but you already know that too from this thread.

This summer as I began the new series of photographs it was to my dismay to observe the decay and falling brick. I plan to take a second/winter set of photographs this January of each tower. This August I was accompanied by a young lady from the Kremlin Regiment (palace guards) while taking photos and she was amazed at not only what I could explain to her about each tower, but like myself was dismayed to see the decay.

The original Kremlin wall was white stone and part of it is still there--the red brick wall was built on top of the original foundation.

We should always remember fallen heros, including those journalists in Russia who have paid a price for speaking the truth. I plan to dedicate this book to the memories of these fallen heros and list their names on the inside covers much like the names of the fallen war heros from 1812 are memorialized on the walls of Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Saviour.

They represent that white foundation on which the future bricks of Russian democracy will be laid.

They are truly the "21st" tower.


 

 

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