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Author Topic: Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info  (Read 30601 times)

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Offline Vinnvinny

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #60 on: December 06, 2011, 05:56:02 PM »
Oh, and one final thing that is a real blessing. When the little lady is on her period I kick her back to her mothers apartment. Actually, she has learned to judge her own temperament these days so it is usually only every two months now and I don't need to kick.

I was researching the archives for a current topic, and I found this little gem.  :o

As he makes 'two pairs of long johns last a few years' she's probably happy to go! ;)

They won't steal his long johns in Latvian hostels at least.........

Oh, the glamour of the expat life.  :duh:

Do you think its possible that his wife stopped menstrating years ago and now fakes it so she can go to her mums for some rest bite?

(Just kidding Scott  tiphat)

Offline nicknick

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #61 on: March 09, 2012, 02:35:18 AM »
More coming soon and please suggest additions.

Just to add something to this list of blogs.

I came across this blog a little while ago when I was searching for something and found it quite amusing and true to life from the Russians that I know in this country.

It's written by the American spouse of a Russian and they live in New Jersey.

So, it's not about Russia as such but more about dealing with a cross-cultural marriage in the USA:-

http://likethevodka.com/


From the blog:-

Quote
I write about the ups and downs of being married to and parenting with someone from another country. My observations are based on firsthand experience with the Russians in my life but are not intended as a generalization about all Russians. So no disrespect, Russians, seriously. Though you have to admit you guys are into some wacky stuff

Offline Manny

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #62 on: March 09, 2012, 08:58:51 AM »
I think I found new reading matter Nick. I just nearly fell off my chair laughing at this: http://likethevodka.wpengine.com/the-russian-has-a-toothache/

Anyone married to a Russian will relate to that!
I apologise.
And so he should.........


Offline Millaa

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #63 on: March 09, 2012, 09:08:23 AM »
I'm reading about EdVallance kamchatka's trips... hmm, its 3 am here  :hidechair:
Скептический ум - страшное оружие с собственным счастьем

Offline AnfieldRiot

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #64 on: March 19, 2012, 11:53:52 PM »
  An overview of life past and present in Russia & Ukraine. Covers most aspects of life, art, sport, politics, travel, etc...

  Russian - Ukrainian Examiner

   http://russiaukraine.tumblr.com/

Offline mursal_mahmud

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Re: Resources and about Expatriate Life
« Reply #65 on: January 16, 2014, 11:45:51 AM »
 tiphat

May I know how about tolerance and appreciation from Russian community in general upon Asian immigrants in particularly those coming from South East Asia countries. As a real fact in Indonesia, we are so much appreciative for foreign visitors.
Let us be nice to fill our live in peaceful ways but in balancing response. Love me from Indonesia.

Offline Pyotr Alexeyevich

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Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info
« Reply #66 on: January 17, 2014, 01:51:47 AM »
mahud, Russia no every time nice for foreign people but big country. In Soviet structure so many race but not melted pot. Only everybody inside pot, but no melted.

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info
« Reply #67 on: April 23, 2014, 02:44:44 PM »
So what are we to make of the new migration law signed this week by President Putin on migration?

First, there are several essential reasons for this revision of Russia's statutes on foreign citizens living inside Russia's borders:

1- Crimea has a significant non-Russian population and not just of ethnic Ukrainians and Tatars although you can expect them to be targeted as we've already seen with the 5-year banishment last week of the Tatar leadership.

2- Were you to attend Security Council meetings it wouldn't take long to understand that the present leadership is consumed with the threat of a "colour revolution" making its way to Moscow. It is easier to control native citizens than outsiders and so the screws will tighten on anyone suspected of being inside Russia for reasons connected to political activity. As the Soviet Union considered all foreign journalists to be spies, and the current leadership is from the Soviet structure, expect to see the clampdown of journalistic activities to continue.

3- Moscow has a sizable illegal immigration problem, primarily from Central Asia. This is the primary reason the press and government will list when the new law is questioned and to be sure it is a factor, but not really the main factor as existing laws already gave the authorities freedom to deal with this issue. This issue will be the "talking points" when the subject is questioned.

Beginning immediately, foreign nationals applying to live inside Russia will be required to prove their knowledge of Russian language, Russian history, and the system of government of the Russian Federation. The law is specifically aimed at for foreign nationals who receive a temporary residence permit, permanent residence permit, or apply for a work permit with the exception for highly sought out specialists in government approved industries.

Those already inside Russia have until 1 January 2015 to comply.

Signed into law yesterday, the document amends the Federal Law "On the Legal Status of Foreign Citizens in the Russian Federation"
and repeals certain provisions of the existing statutes to consolidate the new requirements. In layman's terms the new law requires existing "expats" to comply with the statute by 1 January 2015. New applicants will be required to meet the standards immediately.

- So, what is required for language skills?

The new law refers to a "baseline" which seems to be defined as the annual skill level tests for young schoolchildren to have the ability to converse, read, write and count at a basic level. Children must meet a baseline in order to advance in grade level. Not exceptionally difficult for most expats/residents with a modest investment of time and practice.

- What are the history knowledge guidelines?

Keeping in mind that the law is new and that the regulatory bureaucrats have yet to put their fingerprints on it, the legislative intent of the law is that someone living inside Russia should know the basics of Russian history. They're not trying to force one to be a history expert but they do seem to want a resident to understand the basics found in any elementary Russian history textbook.

- How about the requirements for understanding Russia's political system or as the law defines it, the "legal basis for the Russian Federation"?

If you've read the Constitution and understand the requirements for holding office, for voting, and how elections are held regionally and federally then one should be fine.

That being said, there are two underlying intents of this bill and one of them is the expulsion of those who come to Russia in order to change the existing political order. Of course that intent is defined from the lens of those who are in power so one must understand that he/she could be a constitutional scholar of the highest order and still find themselves expelled from the Federation.  For the average expat/resident this shouldn't be an issue.

- Will this impact foreign students?

Not substantially. Lawmakers want foreign students a lot more than they want foreign aid and political folk, Ukrainians earning a living in Russia and sending the money back to Ukraine, or migrant labourers from Central Asia. They also understand that foreign students pick up the language basics fairly quickly and most don't come to Russia to start a colour revolution.

Just to be sure however I phoned up the lovely daughter Kseniya who works with foreign students at Moscow State University and asked. She doesn't know yet as the University's legal department has not had the opportunity to go over the new law and then disseminate their directives to individual departments.

I can't imagine the new law having an adverse impact on student visas, however there is enough ambiguity in some of the requirements to allow the government to use it as a pretext for booting out certain types of students (the Fulbright programme being one potential category) should the new Cold War escalate and Russia decide it convenient to boot a group just to make a point.

- So, how does one "prove" a knowledge of language, history and the system of government?

The bureaucrats will eventually set out those requirements but President Putin has commented that a course from a Russian University or language school that includes some history and government information in the coursework would be a good foundation to meet those requirements. It is an easy way for the government to verify the information and hold Russian institutions accountable should it be discovered that a foreign person obtained such documentation illegally (bribes, etc).

- Will the government really check on how I obtained the documentation?

I would imagine spots checks depending on who is doing the checking but I also think that this is more of an issue for folk who are part of the target group. Someone living in Russia who never rocks the boat and keeps their nose clean would not likely have an issue unless they were not yet in the process. All new applicants will be vetted according to the new law.


Online andrewfi

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Re: Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info
« Reply #68 on: April 26, 2014, 05:49:50 AM »
Mendy, I would like to correct factual errors in your post above.
You told us that 'the Tatar leadership' have been banished from Crimea for five years.

While it is just about conceivable that your understanding of the matter was as per your words above, when you wrote them, you now know that this is not the case.

For your confirmation, one man, Mustafa Dzhemilev, who is seen by some as being a community leader among the Crimean Tatars, was handed, it is claimed, a piece of paper. The piece of paper was handed to one person and addresses nobody by name, much less the entire Tatar community leadership.
The recipient does not know who gave him the paper but he claims it was passed to his hand as he crossed the Russian/Ukraine border. The recipient knows that it is not an official document and has stated as much. The paper that has been shown to the world is devoid of heading, document number, official seals or stamps and bears no signature.

In addition, it has been made clear by the Russian government that no such order banishing Mustafa Dzhemilev has been made.

While there is much that is useful in your posts, when sharing information that is purported by yourself to be factual it is important that the information is correct.

Thanks for the useful information you post, I am sure that you will correct the errors of fact in your article above, yes?
"For what else is the life of man but a kind of play in which men in various costumes perform until the director motions them offstage?" -Erasmus

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info
« Reply #69 on: April 26, 2014, 10:50:42 PM »
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who is seen by some as being a community leader among the Crimean Tatars, was handed, it is claimed, a piece of paper.

Seen by some? You're too far removed to know much about this issue apparently.

Give that photos of the piece of paper have been published, I'd say your choice of wording in "claimed" might not be factual.

A piece of paper? Yes it was. It was handed to him at a border checkpoint. Are you aware of who mans border checkpoints, Andy?

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The recipient does not know who gave him the paper

Wrong again. He knows that it was the border guard who checked his papers/passport.

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The paper that has been shown to the world is devoid of heading, document number, official seals or stamps and bears no signature.

Lets play a guessing game. You get 3 choices:
- Are you suggesting that it was an invitation to a BBQ party, then?   

- Perhaps the neighborhood watch society was holding an ice cream social and wanted him to feel welcome, it that what you're thinking?

- Or, was it a form of intimidation designed to send a message while being vague enough to the outside world that someone in Moscow could speculate that the army surplus stores are now selling documents?

Quote
I am sure that you will correct the errors of fact in your article above, yes?

If at some point I feel there was an error, then sure. I'm still waiting for someone to explain how all those masked me fell out of airplanes from Russ and ended up driving around in professional military equipment from Russia, but none of the men were from Russia?! Golly, gee, miracles of miracles. There are lots of "facts" that need to be cleared up in this mess, Andy.

Offline AkMike

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Re: Expatriate Life: Resources & Visa info
« Reply #70 on: April 27, 2014, 07:18:12 AM »
Mendy, you're talking to a brick wall  :'( that has no sense of reality.

The ignore button works out quite well.  :party0031:
Thomas Jefferson Quotation, "My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government."